Skip header and navigation

Refine By

108 records – page 1 of 11.

[6-hour workday--consequences for nursing services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238956
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Apr 3;72(7):18-21, 34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-1985

[About the conditions of training and retraining of physicians and nurse personnel for the primary medical sanitary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155048
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2008 May-Jun;(3):41-4
Publication Type
Article
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
D J Weinkauf
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice - manpower
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Primary Health Care - manpower
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
PubMed ID
9189287 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of psychosocial work environment in primary care--development of a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198928
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
S. Wilhelmsson
I. Akerlind
T. Faresjö
A C Ek
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Med Syst. 1999 Dec;23(6):447-56
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Psychology, Social
Public Health Nursing - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Sweden
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent studies have indicated deteriorated working conditions of health care personnel. To have an efficient health care organization requires good working conditions and the well-being of the personnel. Today there are no "gold-standard" assessment tools measuring psychosocial working conditions. The aim of this study was to develop two valid and reliable questionnaires, one generic and one specific, measuring psychosocial working conditions for general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses (DNs) in Sweden, with a special emphasis on organizational changes. The construction of the questionnaires were made after a stepwise developing phase including literature review, interviews, and a pilot study. The pilot study included GPs n = 42 and DNs n = 39. The questionnaires were later on used in a main study (GPs n = 465, DNs n = 465). A factor analysis was carried out and showed that there were fewer items in the main study that had factor loading > or = 0.40 in more than one factor, compared to the pilot study. The factors from the main study were easier to label and had good correspondence with other studies. After this stepwise development phase good construct validity and internal consistency were established for the questionnaire.
PubMed ID
10763164 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers and facilitators to implementing Decision Boxes in primary healthcare teams to facilitate shared decisionmaking: a study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121904
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2012;12:85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anik Giguere
Michel Labrecque
Roland Grad
Michel Cauchon
Matthew Greenway
France Légaré
Pierre Pluye
Stephane Turcotte
Lisa Dolovich
R Brian Haynes
Author Affiliation
Health Information Research Unit, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, CRL-139, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4?K1, Canada. anikgiguere@videotron.ca
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2012;12:85
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration - utilization
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, organizational
Organizational Culture
Patient care team
Primary Health Care - manpower
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Social Facilitation
Abstract
Decision Boxes are summaries of the most important benefits and harms of health interventions provided to clinicians before they meet the patient, to prepare them to help patients make informed and value-based decisions. Our objective is to explore the barriers and facilitators to using Decision Boxes in clinical practice, more precisely factors stemming from (1) the Decision Boxes themselves, (2) the primary healthcare team (PHT), and (3) the primary care practice environment.
A two-phase mixed methods study will be conducted. Eight Decision Boxes relevant to primary care, and written in both English and in French, will be hosted on a website together with a tutorial to introduce the Decision Box. The Decision Boxes will be delivered as weekly emails over a span of eight weeks to clinicians of PHTs (family physicians, residents and nurses) in five primary care clinics located across two Canadian provinces. Using a web-questionnaire, clinicians will rate each Decision Box with the Information Assessment Method (cognitive impacts, relevance, usefulness, expected benefits) and with a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behavior to study the determinants of clinicians' intention to use what they learned from that Decision Box in their patient encounter (attitude, social norm, perceived behavioral control). Web-log data will be used to monitor clinicians' access to the website. Following the 8-week intervention, we will conduct semi-structured group interviews with clinicians and individual interviews with clinic administrators to explore contextual factors influencing the use of the Decision Boxes. Data collected from questionnaires, focus groups and individual interviews will be combined to identify factors potentially influencing implementation of Decision Boxes in clinical practice by clinicians of PHTs.
This project will allow tailoring of Decision Boxes and their delivery to overcome the specific barriers identified by clinicians of PHTs to improve the implementation of shared decision making in this setting.
Notes
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Jun;36(2):89-10315369167
Cites: Implement Sci. 2012;7:7222862935
Cites: J Nurs Care Qual. 2004 Jan-Mar;19(1):18-24; quiz 25-614717144
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2005 Jan;55(510):6-1315667759
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Mar;60(3):301-1216051459
Cites: Health Expect. 2007 Dec;10(4):364-7917986073
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Dec;73(3):526-3518752915
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Apr;75(1):37-5219036550
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(5):CD00673220464744
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2011 Jan;25(1):18-2520795835
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2010 Dec;16(6):1236-4320722882
Cites: Implement Sci. 2011;6:521241514
Cites: Health Expect. 2011 Mar;14 Suppl 1:96-11020629764
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:2321281487
Cites: BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2011;11:1721385470
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;17(4):554-6420695950
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(10):CD00143121975733
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Sep;49(5):651-6110452420
PubMed ID
22867107 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can organizational justice help the retention of general practitioners?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115920
Source
Health Policy. 2013 Apr;110(1):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Kristiina Manderbacka
Jukka Vänskä
Marko Elovainio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
Health Policy. 2013 Apr;110(1):22-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Finland
General Practitioners - organization & administration - psychology - supply & distribution
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Turnover
Primary Health Care - manpower - organization & administration
Social Justice
Young Adult
Abstract
In many countries, public sector has major difficulties in recruiting and retaining physicians to work as general practitioners (GPs). We examined the effects of taking up a public sector GP position and leaving public sector GP work on the changes of job satisfaction, job involvement and turnover intentions. In addition, we examined whether organizational justice in the new position would moderate these associations. This was a four-year prospective questionnaire study including two measurements among 1581 (948 women, 60%) Finnish physicians. A change to work as a public GP was associated with a substantial decrease in job satisfaction and job involvement when new GPs experienced that their primary care organization was unfair. However, high organizational justice was able to buffer against these negative effects. Those who changed to work as public GPs had 2.8 times and those who stayed as public GPs had 1.6 times higher likelihood of having turnover intentions compared to those who worked in other positions. Organizational justice was not able to buffer against this effect. Primary care organizations should pay more attention to their GPs - especially to newcomers - and to the fairness how management behaves towards employees, how processes are determined, and how rewards are distributed.
PubMed ID
23453045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Challenges and opportunities in building a sustainable rural primary care workforce in alignment with the Affordable Care Act: the WWAMI program as a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106695
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Dec;88(12):1862-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Suzanne M Allen
Ruth A Ballweg
Ellen M Cosgrove
Kellie A Engle
Lawrence R Robinson
Roger A Rosenblatt
Susan M Skillman
Marjorie D Wenrich
Author Affiliation
Dr. Allen is clinical professor of family medicine and vice dean for regional affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Ballweg is professor of family medicine and director, MEDEX Northwest Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Cosgrove is professor of medicine and vice dean for academic affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Engle is director of operations, Office of Regional Affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Robinson is professor of rehabilitation medicine and vice dean for graduate medical education and clinical affairs, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Dr. Rosenblatt is professor and vice chair of family medicine and director, Rural/Underserved Opportunities Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Skillman is deputy director, WWAMI Rural Health Research Center and UW Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. Ms. Wenrich is affiliate assistant professor of biomedical informatics and medical education, University of Washington School of Medicine, and chief of staff, UW Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Dec;88(12):1862-9
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Education, Medical, Graduate - organization & administration
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Northwestern United States
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Physician Assistants - education - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution - trends
Physicians, Primary Care - education - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution - trends
Primary Health Care - manpower - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
The authors examine the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on a large medical education program in the Northwest United States that builds the primary care workforce for its largely rural region. The 42-year-old Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI) program, hosted by the University of Washington School of Medicine, is one of the nation's most successful models for rural health training. The program has expanded training and retention of primary care health professionals for the region through medical school education, graduate medical education, a physician assistant training program, and support for practicing health professionals.The ACA and resulting accountable care organizations (ACOs) present potential challenges for rural settings and health training programs like WWAMI that focus on building the health workforce for rural and underserved populations. As more Americans acquire health coverage, more health professionals will be needed, especially in primary care. Rural locations may face increased competition for these professionals. Medical schools are expanding their positions to meet the need, but limits on graduate medical education expansion may result in a bottleneck, with insufficient residency positions for graduating students. The development of ACOs may further challenge building a rural workforce by limiting training opportunities for health professionals because of competing demands and concerns about cost, efficiency, and safety associated with training. Medical education programs like WWAMI will need to increase efforts to train primary care physicians and increase their advocacy for student programs and additional graduate medical education for rural constituents.
PubMed ID
24128621 View in PubMed
Less detail

The changing paradigm of contemporary U.S. allopathic medical school graduates' career paths: analysis of the 1997-2004 national AAMC Graduation Questionnaire database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83566
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Sep;82(9):888-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Jeffe Donna B
Andriole Dorothy A
Hageman Heather L
Whelan Alison J
Author Affiliation
Washington University School of Medicine, and director, Health Behavior, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. djeffe@im.wustl.edu
Source
Acad Med. 2007 Sep;82(9):888-94
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Databases
Demography
Education, Medical - trends
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Primary Health Care - manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - trends
Specialties, Medical - education - manpower - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
PURPOSE: During the last 15 years, the proportion of U.S. allopathic medical graduates planning to pursue alternative careers (other than full-time clinical practice) has been increasing. The authors sought to identify factors associated with contemporary medical graduates' career-setting plans. METHOD: The authors obtained anonymous data from the 108,408 U.S. allopathic medical graduates who completed the 1997-2004 national Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire (GQ). Using multinomial logistic regression, responses to eight GQ items regarding graduates' demographics, medical school characteristics, and specialty choice were tested in association with three career-setting plans (full-time university faculty; other, including government agencies, non-university-based research, or medical or health care administration; or undecided) compared with full-time (nonacademic) clinical practice. RESULTS: The sample included 94,101 (86.8% of 108,408) GQ respondents with complete data. From 1997 to 2004, the proportions of graduates planning full-time clinical practice careers decreased from 51.3% to 46.5%; the proportions selecting primary care and obstetrics-gynecology specialties also decreased. Graduates reporting Hispanic race/ethnicity or no response to race/ethnicity, lower debt, dual advanced degrees at graduation, and psychiatric-specialty choice were consistently more likely to plan to pursue alternative careers. Graduates selecting an obstetrics-gynecology specialty/ subspecialty were consistently less likely to plan to pursue alternative careers. Being female, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black or Native American/Alaskan, and selecting non-primary-care specialties were variably associated with alternative career plans. CONCLUSIONS: As the medical student population becomes more demographically diverse, as graduates increasingly select non-primary-care specialties, and as dual-degree-program graduates and alternative career opportunities for physicians expand, the proportion of U.S. graduates planning full-time clinical practice careers likely will continue to decline.
PubMed ID
17726402 View in PubMed
Less detail

108 records – page 1 of 11.