Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Preventive health care for young children: Findings from a 10-country study and directions for United States policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36720
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
B C Williams
C A Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400.
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Immunization - standards
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Population Surveillance
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Social Welfare
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Infant health and survival in the US compare unfavorably with other Western industrial democracies. Circumstances that contribute to favorable pregnancy outcomes in other countries include nearly complete participation of pregnant women in early prenatal care and linkage of care to extensive support benefits. The study reported here extends these earlier observations to preventive health services for children from infancy through adolescence and to the social benefit programs that support their families. This report looks at the condition of children in 10 European countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All of these countries have better infant survival rates than the US, and they all share elements of pluralism in their systems of health care.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatrics. 1992 Dec;90(6):1005-61437418
PubMed ID
1574377 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitude of general practitioners to the importance of gender and diet in disease prevention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10741
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1999
Author
U. Hølund
G. Boysen
P. Charles
E F Eriksen
O K Overvad
B H Petersson
B. Sandström
A R Thomassen
M A Vittrup
Author Affiliation
Mejeriernes Ernaeringscenter, Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 4;161(1):40-3
Date
Jan-4-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three hundred and seventy-four general practitioners (GPs) in Denmark filled in a questionnaire on attitudes to include information on gender and diet in the strategy for prevention of coronary heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and overweight/underweight. Risk factors for disease in general were ranked as follows: smoking, alcohol, stress, diet, physical exercise, heredity and hygiene. The patients' lack of motivation, insufficient time for each patient, and inadequate knowledge about nutrition were stated as barriers to dietary counselling. The GPs stated that the gender of the patient was important only to the counselling on osteoporosis. Lack of time and insufficient knowledge were perceived as barriers for including gender specific issues in prevention. It is concluded that GPs consider dietary counselling important but lack time and knowledge. The results point at a need for better pre- and postgraduate training in nutrition, and for a better reimbursement system for time spent on prevention.
PubMed ID
9922687 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improved allocation of HIV prevention resources: using information about prevention program production functions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175627
Source
Health Care Manag Sci. 2005 Feb;8(1):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Margaret L Brandeau
Gregory S Zaric
Vanda de Angelis
Author Affiliation
Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
Source
Health Care Manag Sci. 2005 Feb;8(1):19-28
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Resource Allocation
Abstract
To allocate HIV prevention resources effectively, it is important to have information about the effectiveness of alternative prevention programs as a function of expenditure. We refer to this relationship as the "production function" for a prevention program. Few studies of HIV prevention programs have reported this relationship. This paper demonstrates the value of such information. We present a simple model for allocating HIV prevention resources, and apply the model to an illustrative HIV prevention resource allocation problem. We show that, without sufficient information about prevention program production functions, suboptimal decisions may be made. We show that epidemiologic data, such as estimates of HIV prevalence or incidence, may not provide enough information to support optimal allocation of HIV prevention resources. Our results suggest that good allocations can be obtained based on fairly basic information about prevention program production functions: an estimate of fixed cost plus a single estimate of cost and resulting risk reduction. We find that knowledge of production functions is most important when fixed cost is high and/or when the budget is a significantly constraining factor. We suggest that, at the minimum, future data collection on prevention program effectiveness should include fixed and variable cost estimates for the intervention when implemented at a "typical" level, along with a detailed description of the intervention and detailed description of costs by category.
PubMed ID
15782509 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ways of enhancing the efficiency of tuberculosis-controlling measures and reducing their cost].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185173
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(4):7-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A L Kurcherov
E Iu Il'icheva
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(4):7-11
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Efficiency, Organizational
Fluoroscopy - economics - instrumentation - standards
Humans
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Russia
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Abstract
As of now, there are prerequisites for enhancing the efficiency of tuberculosis-controlling measures and for reducing their cost by utilizing material and personnel resources in priority areas. These include: to detect patients with tuberculosis by using current computer technologies, to apply digital X-ray plants, to recruit general practitioners for preventive measures against tuberculosis, to reduce the cost of treatment in patients with tuberculosis by decreasing hospital stay. Introduction of currently available procedures substantially lowers the cost of antituberculous aid and enhances its efficiency.
PubMed ID
12774409 View in PubMed
Less detail