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A 3-year follow-up study of Swedish youths committed to juvenile institutions: Frequent occurrence of criminality and health care use regardless of drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288173
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ola Ståhlberg
Sofia Boman
Christina Robertsson
Nóra Kerekes
Henrik Anckarsäter
Thomas Nilsson
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2017 Jan - Feb;50:52-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Residential Treatment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This 3-year follow-up study compares background variables, extent of criminality and criminal recidivism in the form of all court convictions, the use of inpatient care, and number of early deaths in Swedish institutionalized adolescents (N=100) with comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=25) versus those with SUD but no ADHD (n=30), and those without SUD (n=45). In addition it aims to identify whether potential risk factors related to these groups are associated with persistence in violent criminality. Results showed almost no significant differences between the three diagnostic groups, but the SUD plus ADHD group displayed a somewhat more negative outcome with regard to criminality, and the non-SUD group stood out with very few drug related treatment episodes. However, the rate of criminal recidivism was strikingly high in all three groups, and the use of inpatient care as well as the number of untimely deaths recorded in the study population was dramatically increased compared to a age matched general population group. Finally, age at first conviction emerged as the only significant predictor of persistence in violent criminality with an AUC of .69 (CI (95%) .54-.84, p=.02). Regardless of whether SUD, with or without ADHD, is at hand or not, institutionalized adolescents describe a negative course with extensive criminality and frequent episodes of inpatient treatment, and thus requires a more effective treatment than present youth institutions seem to offer today. However, the few differences found between the three groups, do give some support that those with comorbid SUD and ADHD have the worst prognosis with regard to criminality, health, and untimely death, and as such are in need of even more extensive treatment interventions.
PubMed ID
27745884 View in PubMed
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A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99387
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Josefin Westerberg-Jacobson
Birgitta Edlund
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, BMC, Husargatan, Uppsala, Sweden. josefin.westerberg-jacobson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Child
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Eating Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20-year-old) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices and to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood.
PubMed ID
20443204 View in PubMed
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12-month follow-up of an exploratory 'brief intervention' for high-frequency cannabis users among Canadian university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124885
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Wayne Jones
Paul Shuper
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addictions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 2400, 515 West Hastings St,, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, Canada. bfischer@sfu.ca
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Young Adult
Abstract
One in three young people use cannabis in Canada. Cannabis use can be associated with a variety of health problems which occur primarily among intensive/frequent users. Availability and effectiveness of conventional treatment for cannabis use is limited. While Brief Interventions (BIs) have been shown to result in short-term reductions of cannabis use risks or problems, few studies have assessed their longer-term effects. The present study examined 12-month follow-up outcomes for BIs in a cohort of young Canadian high-frequency cannabis users where select short-term effects (3 months) had previously been assessed and demonstrated.
N=134 frequent cannabis users were recruited from among university students in Toronto, randomized to either an oral or a written cannabis BI, or corresponding health controls, and assessed in-person at baseline, 3-months, and 12-months. N=72 (54%) of the original sample were retained for follow-up analyses at 12-months where reductions in 'deep inhalation/breathholding' (Q=13.1; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22538183 View in PubMed
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A 12-year National Study of Suicide by Jumping From Bridges in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293093
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Aleksandra Sæheim
Ingebjørg Hestetun
Erlend Mork
Latha Nrugham
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2017 Oct-Dec; 21(4):568-576
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from several countries suggest that erecting fences on bridges more commonly used for suicide by jumping may be an effective way of reducing the risk of suicide by jumping from these bridges. Distribution of suicides by jumping off bridges has not yet been studied on a national level in any country. This study included all suicides by jumping from high places registered in the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry (COD) in the period 1999-2010 (n = 319). Combining data from the COD registry and information from police records, 71 cases of suicide by jumping off a bridge were identified involving 36 bridges. This form of suicide constituted approximately 1% of all suicides in Norway in the period 1999-2010. Almost half of these suicides were registered at only 6 bridges. Three Norwegian bridges were secured during the observation period of this study. Two bridges had barriers installed on the full length of the bridge with 11 suicides registered before barriers were installed, and none after. On the 1 bridge that was only partially secured, no change in numbers of suicides was observed after barriers were installed. One-third of jumps from bridges occurred over land. We found that although suicide by jumping off bridges was a relatively rare event, there is a potential for saving lives by installing physical barriers on bridges that are more commonly used for suicide by jumping.
PubMed ID
27309998 View in PubMed
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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth suicide in Quebec: the contribution of public policy for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108699
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michel Tousignant
Livia Vitenti
Nathalie Morin
Author Affiliation
CRISE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: tousignant.michel@uqam.ca.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2013 Sep-Dec;36(5-6):399-405
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime
Databases, Factual
Female
Housing
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Public Policy
Qualitative Research
Quebec - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The high rate of youth suicide in some First Nations villages of Northern Quebec is an important public health problem. Based on a six-year field study in three villages belonging to the Atikamekw and Anishinabe groups, this paper proposes changes in three areas of social policy that could contribute to prevention of youth suicide. These three areas are: youth protection, administration of justice, and housing. An argument is made first to adapt the youth protection law of Quebec and to give greater responsibility to communities in individual cases in order to prevent child placement outside the villages. Regarding the administration of justice, we suggest initiatives to encourage rapid prosecution of crimes on reserves and the adoption of an approach based on reconciliation between perpetrator and victim. Finally, we indicate how housing measures could help safeguard children's wellbeing given that overcrowding can contribute to suicide. The discussion also proposes that these three key changes in social policy could be relevant in other Aboriginal communities both within and outside of Quebec.
PubMed ID
23856179 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of HPV vaccination among young adults aged 18-30 years--a population based survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140702
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Nov 3;28(47):7492-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2010
Author
Karin Sundström
Trung Nam Tran
Cecilia Lundholm
Cecilia Young
Pär Sparén
Lisen Arnheim Dahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. karin.sundstrom@ki.se
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Nov 3;28(47):7492-500
Date
Nov-3-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral - prevention & control
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control - virology
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination seems to be high in the Western world but fewer data are available for men than for women. There are also concerns that HPV vaccination might lead young people to change their healthcare-related behaviours. We investigated these issues in a population-based survey performed in Sweden during January-May, 2007, just after HPV vaccination had been licensed. A total of 10567 men and women aged 18 to 30 years participated. The intention to accept HPV vaccination among these young adults was relatively high but could likely be improved with higher awareness of HPV-related diseases as well as of the safety and efficacy of vaccines in general. Also, the cost of the vaccine needs to be affordable. Even though few young adults stated their healthcare-related behaviours would change after HPV vaccination, a significant number were uncertain, suggesting a need for continued educational efforts when HPV-vaccinating this group.
PubMed ID
20851088 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
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Access to primary and preventive care among foreign-born adults in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141023
Source
Health Serv Res. 2010 Dec;45(6 Pt 1):1693-719
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Lydie A Lebrun
Lisa C Dubay
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, Room 447, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. llebrun@jhsph.edu
Source
Health Serv Res. 2010 Dec;45(6 Pt 1):1693-719
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services
Primary Health Care
Transients and Migrants
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
To conduct cross-country comparisons and assess the effect of foreign birth on access to primary and preventive care in Canada and the United States.
Secondary data from the 2002 to 2003 Joint Canada-United States Survey of Health.
Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted, and logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of immigrant status and country of residence on access to care. Outcomes included measures of health care systems and processes, utilization, and patient perceptions.
In adjusted analyses, immigrants in Canada fared worse than nonimmigrants regarding having timely Pap tests; in the United States, immigrants fared worse for having a regular doctor and an annual consultation with a health professional. Immigrants in Canada had better access to care than immigrants in the United States; most of these differences were explained by differences in socioeconomic status and insurance coverage across the two countries. However, U.S. immigrants were more likely to have timely Pap tests than Canadian immigrants, even after adjusting for potential confounders.
In both countries, foreign-born populations had worse access to care than their native-born counterparts for some indicators but not others. However, few differences in access to care were found when direct cross-country comparisons were made between immigrants in Canada versus the United States, after accounting for sociodemographic differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819107 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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1506 records – page 1 of 151.