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A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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A 13-year follow-up of a comprehensive program of fissure sealing and resealing in Varkaus, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189084
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
E. Lavonius
E. Kerosuo
S. Kervanto-Seppälä
N. Halttunen
T. Vilkuna
I. Pietilä
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Institute of Dentistry, Finland. e.lavonius@btinternet.com
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Jun;60(3):174-9
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicuspid
Child
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Bonding
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Molar
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Retreatment
Retrospective Studies
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine the coverage of the sealing program on first permanent molars (FPMs) and second permanent molars (SPMs) and first and second premolars (FSPMs), as well as to monitor the fate of the sealed teeth over time. All patients born in 1977 who had had regular check-ups in the Varkaus Health Center, Finland (n = 166) were included in the 1996 study. Data on the annual state of each tooth had been collected retrospectively since 1983. The coverage for the sealant program was 95%, 92%, and 6% of the FPMs, SPMs, and FSPMs, respectively. Out of the FPMs sealed at age 6 years, 28% were subjected to resealing, 13% developed occlusal, and 15% proximal caries during a 13-year follow-up period. From the SPMs sealed at age 11 years, 24% were subjected to resealing, 4% developed occlusal caries, and less than 2% proximal caries during the 9-year follow-up. None of the sealed FSPMs and only 1% of the non-sealed ones developed occlusal caries during the 9-year period. The mean DMF in the study population (n = 160) at age 12 years was 0.8 (n = 124), compared to a nation-wide mean value of 1.2. A large percentage of the FPMs and SPMs were sealed and then resealed during the study period. Although the study design lacked a control group for comparison, the lower caries rates of this study compared to the results of other studies with only a single application of sealants suggest a major role for resealing.
PubMed ID
12166912 View in PubMed
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A 13-year report on childhood sinusitis: clinical presentations, predisposing factors and possible means of prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15834
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
G. Henriksson
K M Westrin
J. Kumlien
P. Stierna
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Rhinology. 1996 Sep;34(3):171-5
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethmoid Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Nasal Polyps - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sinusitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Two hundred and nineteen children with sinusitis treated as in-patients at Huddinge University Hospital during the period 1980-1992 have been reviewed. Epidemiological data, the clinical picture, treatment and complications are described. The prevalence of significant predisposing conditions (such as upper airway allergy, asthma, and immunoglobulin deficiency) has been estimated. Serious sinusitis complications are few, surgery is only rarely required, and previously-recognized important predisposing paediatric conditions are not significantly more common than in the general juvenile population. Improved medication and prevention may have reduced the incidence of serious sinus infections in risk groups today. Children with cystic fibrosis have been reviewed with regard to the necessity of both sinus and nasal polyp surgery. Aggressive medical therapy appears to have reduced their need for sinus surgery as well as polypectomy.
PubMed ID
8938888 View in PubMed
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

[A 7-year experience with goiter surgery in an otorhinolaryngologic department. A retrospective study of the the period 1990-1996]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21042
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 26;161(17):2537-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1999
Author
T R Nielsen
F. Clement
H. Pihl
S. Vadstrup
Author Affiliation
Centralsygehuset Nykøbing F, øre-, naese- og halsafdelingen og medicinsk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 26;161(17):2537-41
Date
Apr-26-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Goiter - pathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - prevention & control
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Thyroid Diseases - pathology - surgery
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Thyroidectomy - adverse effects - methods - standards
Abstract
The aim of this study was quality assurance and to analyse the frequency of complications following thyroid surgery. The most dreaded surgical complications are permanent injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve or persistent hypocalcaemia. Our surgical procedure included the use of the surgical microscope in connection with thyroid grand surgery. Our materiel includes 122 patients who underwent surgery for benign thyroid diseases in our department from 1990-1996. In nearly 50% of all cases a lobectomy was performed, reserving resections and subtotal thyroidectomy to special cases. Resections were primarily done in the beginning of the period. The surgical microscope was used as a standard procedure to identify and expose the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands. Primary thyroid grand surgery in benign disease resulted in permanent unilateral laryngeal nerve palsy in one case or in 0.83% of the patients. When calculated as nerves at risk, the complication rate was reduced to 0.67%. In benign completion surgery the complication rate was 0%. No patient developed persistent hypocalcaemia.
PubMed ID
10327876 View in PubMed
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ABO-incompatible liver transplantation for critically ill adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163388
Source
Transpl Int. 2007 Aug;20(8):675-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Christian Toso
Mohammed Al-Qahtani
Faisal A Alsaif
David L Bigam
Glenda A Meeberg
A M James Shapiro
Vincent G Bain
Norman M Kneteman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Section of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Transpl Int. 2007 Aug;20(8):675-81
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - immunology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Critical Illness
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Rejection - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Graft Survival
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Liver Failure - blood - surgery
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
ABO incompatible (ABO-In) liver transplant remains a controversial solution to acute liver failure in adults. Adult liver recipients with acute liver failure or severely decompensated end-stage disease, intubated and/or in the intensive care unit, were grouped as ABO-In (n = 14), ABO-compatible (n = 29, ABO-C) and ABO-identical (n = 65, ABO-Id). ABO-In received quadruple immunosuppression with antibody-depleting induction agents (except two), calcineurin inhibitors, antimetabolites and steroids. No significant difference of patient and graft survivals was observed among ABO-In, ABO-C and ABO-Id: graft survivals were 64%, 62% and 67%, respectively, in 1 year and 56%, 54% and 60%, respectively, in 5 years; patient survivals 86%, 69% and 67%, respectively, in 1 year and 77%, 61% and 62%, respectively, in 5 years. Three ABO-In grafts were lost (one hyper-acute rejection and two hepatic artery thrombosis). Surgical and infectious complications were similarly distributed between groups, except the hepatic artery thrombosis, more frequent in ABO-In (2, 14%) than ABO-I (1, 1.5%, P
PubMed ID
17521384 View in PubMed
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[About the meeting of the leaders of tuberculosis-controlling services of the subjects of the Russian Federation on progress in 2003].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174866
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2005;(2):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Absenteeism among hospital staff during an influenza epidemic: implications for immunoprophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240175
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1984
Author
G W Hammond
M. Cheang
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Sep 1;131(5):449-52
Date
Sep-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Canada
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Personnel, Hospital
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The 1980-81 epidemic of influenza A/Bangkok 79 was responsible for increased absenteeism (1.7 times the rate for the corresponding period of the subsequent nonepidemic year) among selected hospital staff in Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre. Retrospective study of employment records for 25 of the centre's largest departments showed excess sick-leave costs of about $24 500 during the 2-week period of peak absenteeism that included the epidemic. Although the centre was sampling prospectively for the virus the first positive results became available too late for chemoprophylactic measures to have been effective. The greater increase in absenteeism among nursing staff caring for patients with chronic respiratory disease and nurses working on general medical or pediatric acute infection/isolation wards suggested that these groups be targeted for influenza vaccination in hospitals.
Notes
Cites: South Med J. 1977 Aug;70(8):1023-4887968
Cites: Chest. 1977 May;71(5):576-9852336
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1976 Sep;104(3):248-55961691
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1959 Jan;38(1 Part 2):199-21213620783
Cites: Pediatrics. 1975 May;55(5):673-71168894
Cites: JAMA. 1973 Mar 12;223(11):1233-54739326
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1971 Apr;123(4):446-545110741
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1982;4:25-446754408
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1982 Oct;116(4):589-987137146
Cites: JAMA. 1982 Mar 12;247(10):1451-37057536
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 Apr;113(4):487-911267254
Cites: JAMA. 1980 Dec 5;244(22):2547-97431593
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Mar 16;298(11):587-92628375
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Dec;91(6):974-6925833
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1981 Nov;144(5):433-416273473
PubMed ID
6467117 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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1505 records – page 1 of 151.