Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2614 records – page 1 of 262.

A 6-month follow-up study of 1048 patients diagnosed with an occupational skin disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147641
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tarja Mälkönen
Riitta Jolanki
Kristiina Alanko
Ritva Luukkonen
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Antti Lauerma
Päivikki Susitaival
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Control of Hypersensitivity Diseases and Services for Statistics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Industry
Hand Dermatoses - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Patch Tests
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urticaria - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) often have considerable medical and occupational consequences. Previous data on prognostic factors have been derived from studies with fairly small sample sizes.
To determine the medical and occupational outcome in 1048 patients diagnosed with OSD at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and to identify the prognostic risk factors for the continuation of OSD.
Patients examined in 1994-2001 filled out a follow-up questionnaire 6 months after the diagnosis. Data on atopy, contact allergies, and occupation were analysed.
Six months after the diagnosis the skin disease had healed in 27% of the patients. The OSD had cleared up in 17% of those with no changes at work, and in 34% of those who had changed their job/occupation. The best clearing had occurred in the patients with contact urticaria (35%), whereas the healing of allergic (27%) and irritant (23%) contact dermatitis was similar. The risk factors for continuing occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were no changes in work, age > 45 years, food-related occupations, respiratory atopy, and male sex.
The healing of OSD was associated with discontinuation of the causative exposure. A change in work and the presence of easily avoidable work-related allergies were associated with a good prognosis.
PubMed ID
19878240 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 9-year follow-up study of participants and nonparticipants in sigmoidoscopy screening: importance of self-selection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93168
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Blom Johannes
Yin Li
Lidén Annika
Dolk Anders
Jeppsson Bengt
Påhlman Lars
Holmberg Lars
Nyrén Olof
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, K53, Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. johannes.blom@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Sigmoidoscopy - utilization
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-selection may compromise cost-effectiveness of screening programs. We hypothesized that nonparticipants have generally higher morbidity and mortality than participants. METHODS: A Swedish population-based random sample of 1,986 subjects ages 59 to 61 years was invited to sigmoidoscopy screening and followed up for 9 years by means of multiple record linkages to health and population registers. Gender-adjusted cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) and overall and disease group-specific and mortality rate ratio (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for nonparticipants relative to participants. Cancer and mortality rates were also estimated relative to the age-matched, gender-matched, and calendar period-matched Swedish population using standardized incidence ratios and standardized mortality ratios. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent participated. The incidence of colorectal cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), other gastrointestinal cancer (IRR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.6-12.8), lung cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), and smoking-related cancer overall (IRR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5) tended to be increased among nonparticipants relative to participants. Standardized incidence ratios for most of the studied cancers tended to be >1.0 among nonparticipants and
PubMed ID
18483338 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 years of follow-up from the Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20979
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1999
Author
F E Alexander
T J Anderson
H K Brown
A P Forrest
W. Hepburn
A E Kirkpatrick
B B Muir
R J Prescott
A. Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK. freda.alexander@ed.ac.uk
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Date
Jun-5-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control - radiography
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Humans
Logistic Models
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scotland - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening recruited women aged 45-64 years from 1978 to 1981 (cohort 1), and those aged 45-49 years during 1982-85 (cohorts 2 and 3). Results based on 14 years of follow-up and 270,000 woman-years of observation are reported. METHODS: Breast-cancer mortality rates in the intervention group (28,628 women offered screening) were compared with those in the control group (26,026) with adjustment for socioeconomic status (SES) of general medical practices. Rate ratios were derived by means of logistic regression for the total trial population and for women first offered screening while younger than 50 years. Analyses were by intention to treat. FINDINGS: Initial unadjusted results showed a difference of just 13% in breast-cancer mortality rates between the intervention and control groups (156 deaths [5.18 per 10,000] vs 167 [6.04 per 10,000]; rate ratio 0.87 [95% CI 0.70-1.06]), but the results were influenced by differences in SES by trial group. After adjustment for SES, the rate ratio was 0.79 (95% CI 0.60-1.02). When deaths after diagnosis more than 3 years after the end of the study were censored the rate ratio became 0.71 (0.53-0.95). There was no evidence of heterogeneity by age at entry and no evidence that younger entrants had smaller or delayed benefit (rate ratio 0.70 [0.41-1.20]). No breast-cancer mortality benefit was observed for women whose breast cancers were diagnosed when they were younger than 50 years. Other-cause mortality rates did not differ by trial group when adjusted for SES. INTERPRETATION: Our findings confirm results from randomised trials in Sweden and the USA that screening for breast cancer lowers breast-cancer mortality. Similar results are reported by the UK geographical comparison, UK Trial of Early Detection of Breast Cancer. The results for younger women suggest benefit from introduction of screening before 50 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1896-710371561
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946-710489974
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946; author reply 94710489973
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):947-810489975
Comment In: Lancet. 2001 Dec 22-29;358(9299):2165; author reply 2167-811784654
PubMed ID
10371567 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1971-72 epidemic of acute viral hepatitis in Godthaab, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42467
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1976;11(3):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
O. Grove
F. Börsting Larsen
V. Reinicke
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1976;11(3):257-62
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Epistaxis - etiology
Female
Greenland
Hepatic Encephalopathy - etiology
Hepatitis A - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B antigens
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
gamma-Globulins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Viral hepatitis has been known to occur among the Greenland population endemically as well as in smaller and larger epidemics. A large epidemic of acute hepatitis comprising around 9% of the entire population, viz. more than 4000 notified cases, swept through Greenland between October 1970 and December 1972. 996 verified cases were seen in the Godthaab district and subjected to more detailed studies. Most of the Godthaab cases were seen among children and adolescents, and no disease was observed in children less than one year of age. Out of 996 diagnosed cases 9 showed acute hepatic failure with coma. Two further cases of hepatic coma were referred for treatment from outside the district. Three of these 11 patients recovered spontaneously. Of the residual 8 cases 6 were treated with exchange transfusions and steroids. Four of these survived and recovered completely. No lasting sequelae had been registered in any of the surviving cases of the epidemic up to June 1975 (2 1/2 years after cessation of the epidemic). Prophylaxis with gamma-globulin was undertaken in a medium-sized settlement in which practically the entire population received gamma-globulin when the first case of hepatitis was diagnosed. In this settlement only 7 out of 297 inhabitants contracted hepatitis. By contrast, in a similar settlement where no gamma-globulin was given, more than 30% of the population developed icteric hepatitis. The clinical features and the prophylactic effect of gamma-globulin seem to indicate that the epidemic was caused by the hepatitis A virus. In accordance with this, transitory Australia-antigenaemia was demonstrated in the acute phase in only 2.6% of the cases, possibly inidicating a small admixture of acute hepatitis type B to the epidemic predominantly caused by hepatitis A virus.
PubMed ID
58437 View in PubMed
Less detail

1998 clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes in Canada. Canadian Diabetes Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203782
Source
CMAJ. 1998;159 Suppl 8:S1-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Meltzer
L. Leiter
D. Daneman
H C Gerstein
D. Lau
S. Ludwig
J F Yale
B. Zinman
D. Lillie
Author Affiliation
Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1998;159 Suppl 8:S1-29
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Abstract
To revise and expand the 1992 edition of the clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes in Canada incorporating recent advances in diagnosis and outpatient management of diabetes mellitus and to identify and assess the evidence supporting these recommendations.
All aspects of ambulatory diabetes care, including organization, responsibilities, classification, diagnosis, management of metabolic disorders, and methods for screening, prevention and treatment of complications in all forms of diabetes were reviewed, revised as required and expressed as a set of recommendations.
Reclassification of types of diabetes based on pathogenesis; increased sensitivity of diagnostic criteria; recommendations for screening for diabetes; improved delivery of care; recommendations for tighter metabolic control; and optimal methods for screening, prevention and treatment of complications of diabetes.
All recommendations were developed using a justifiable and reproducible process involving an explicit method for the citation and evaluation of the supporting evidence.
All recommendations were reviewed by an expert committee that included people with diabetes, family physicians, dietitians, nurses, diabetologists, as well as other subspecialists and methodologists from across Canada.
More aggressive screening strategies and more sensitive testing and diagnostic procedures will allow earlier detection and management of diabetes. Cost-effectiveness analyses suggest that this will lead to savings in health care costs relating to diabetes care by reducing the incidence of complications of diabetes. Similarly, tighter metabolic control in most people with diabetes, through intensive diabetes management, seeks to reduce the incidence of complications and, hence, their associated social and economic burdens.
This document contains numerous detailed recommendations pertaining to all aspects of ambulatory diabetes care, ranging from service delivery to prevention and treatment of diabetes-related complications. The terms "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" and "non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" should be replaced by the terms "type 1" and "type 2" diabetes. Testing for diabetes using fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level should be performed every 3 years in those over 45 years of age. More frequent or earlier testing should be considered for people with additional specific risk factors for diabetes. The FPG level at which diabetes is diagnosed should be reduced from 7.8 to 7.0 mmol/L to improve the sensitivity of the main diagnostic criterion and reduce the number of missed diagnoses. Depending on the type of diabetes and the therapy required to achieve euglycemia, people with diabetes should generally strive for close metabolic control to achieve optimal glucose levels. This entails receiving appropriate diabetes education through a diabetes health care team, diligent self-monitoring of blood glucose, attention to lifestyle and adjustments in diet and physical activity, and the appropriate and stepwise use of oral agents and insulin therapies needed to maintain glycemic control. Also highlighted is the need for appropriate surveillance programs for complications and management options.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and consensus of all relevant stakeholders. Collateral efforts of the American Diabetes Association and the World Health Organization and the input of international experts were also considered throughout the revision process.
Notes
Cites: Stroke. 1997 Oct;28(10):1861-69341685
Cites: Stroke. 1994 Sep;25(9):1901-148073477
Cites: Stroke. 1991 Aug;22(8):1026-311866749
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 Jul 1;121(1):41-537880225
Cites: Stroke. 1998 Jan;29(1):58-629445329
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Oct 5;161(7):797-810530291
PubMed ID
9834731 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
Less detail

2010 clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in Canada: summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140116
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2010
Author
Alexandra Papaioannou
Suzanne Morin
Angela M Cheung
Stephanie Atkinson
Jacques P Brown
Sidney Feldman
David A Hanley
Anthony Hodsman
Sophie A Jamal
Stephanie M Kaiser
Brent Kvern
Kerry Siminoski
William D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. papaioannou@hhsc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1864-73
Date
Nov-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Bone Density
Bone Density Conservation Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Canada
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - therapy
Osteoporotic Fractures - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Aug 25;370(9588):657-6617720017
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Nov;18(11):1463-7217726622
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2007 Oct;22(10):1479-9117663640
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Oct 22;167(19):2110-517954806
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Nov 1;357(18):1799-80917878149
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):79-8617641811
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2008 Jan;139(1):32-4018167382
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Feb;24(2):353-6019514851
Cites: Clin Biochem. 2009 Jul;42(10-11):929-4219362543
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 20;361(8):756-6519671655
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 20;361(8):745-5519671656
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Sep 1;181(5):265-7119654194
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2009 Oct;23(10):888-9619717503
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2009 Nov;24(11):1800-719419321
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Nov 24;181(11):815-2019841053
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Mar;19(3):365-7217938986
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Feb 5;148(3):197-21318087050
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):581-717924051
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):437-4718292976
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1468-7018364489
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Aug;19(8):1119-2318286218
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Oct;19(10):1363-818546030
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00198310796457
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jan 17;285(3):320-311176842
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2001;12(4):271-811420776
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Mar;87(3):985-9211889149
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Oct;19(10):1395-40818751937
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Sep 16;149(6):404-1518794560
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2008 Oct 20;26(30):4875-8218725648
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):901-818936455
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Nov;18(11):827-3518809340
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Dec;23(12):2095-10518836782
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jan 1;360(1):89-9019118315
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 May;20(5):703-1418802659
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Apr 11;373(9671):1253-6319362675
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD00714619370674
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 23;360(17):1789; author reply 1791-219387022
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2009 Dec;85(6):484-9319823760
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Mar;95(3):1174-8120080842
Cites: Breast. 2010 Apr;19(2):92-620079640
Cites: BMJ. 2010;341:c369120671013
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Aug 11;304(6):657-6320699457
Cites: BMJ. 2010;341:c444420813820
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Sep 7;182(12):1315-920624865
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov;25(11):2350-820499367
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Nov;25(11):2267-9420842676
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):839-4720959961
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):829-3721161508
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Mar;22(3):817-2721161509
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1873-8320967422
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Dec;20(12):2111-2519421702
Cites: Endocr Rev. 2002 Aug;23(4):570-812202472
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Nov 12;167(10 Suppl):S1-3412427685
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Feb;12(1):18-2312571340
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2525-3312759324
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Nov;48(11):3224-914613287
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2004 Jun;19(6):893-915125788
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Apr 6;5:1115068488
Cites: Bone. 2004 Aug;35(2):375-8215268886
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Feb 19;277(7):543-79032160
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2005;6:3916008835
Cites: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Jun;56(3):178-8816144280
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Oct;16(10):1281-9015614441
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2005 Winter;8(4):371-816311420
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jan;88(1):25-3416391246
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Dec 27;296(24):2927-3817190893
Cites: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2007 Feb;58(1):27-3617408160
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2007 Aug;18(8):1033-4617323110
Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):69521464177
Comment In: CMAJ. 2011 Apr 5;183(6):695-621464176
Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 Nov 23;182(17):1829-3020940235
PubMed ID
20940232 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abdominal aortic aneurysms. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and mass screening].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218329
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 30;114(11):1344
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1994
Author
C D Krohn
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 30;114(11):1344
Date
Apr-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - prevention & control - surgery
Humans
Mass Screening
Norway
Prognosis
PubMed ID
8079215 View in PubMed
Less detail

2614 records – page 1 of 262.