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A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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[5 years of prevention of perinatal mortality (1968-1972)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254474
Source
Vie Med Can Fr. 1973 Aug;2(8):775-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1973
Author
R. Jutras
J M Bolduc
Source
Vie Med Can Fr. 1973 Aug;2(8):775-82
Date
Aug-1973
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Preventive Medicine
Quebec
PubMed ID
4760385 View in PubMed
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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102957
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Publication Type
Article
Date
29 Jan 1966
  1 website  
Author
Schmitt N
Hole LW
Barclay WS
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Date
29 Jan 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Online Resources
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1662 records – page 1 of 167.