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Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries-the potential impact of increased physical activity on postmenopausal breast, colon and endometrial cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302455
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2019 Mar;110:42-48. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2019.01.008. Epub 2019 Feb 7.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2019
Author
Andersson TM1
Engholm G
Lund AQ
Lourenço S
Matthiessen J
Pukkala E
Stenbeck M
Tryggvadottir L
Weiderpass E
Storm H
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2019 Mar;110:42-48. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2019.01.008. Epub 2019 Feb 7.
Date
2019
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast cancer
Cancer
Colon cancer
Endometrial cancer
Moderate and vigorous physical activity
Nordic countries
Population attributable fraction
Potential impact fraction
Prevent macrosimulation model
Prevention
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of colon, endometrial and postmenopausal breast cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of the cancer burden in the Nordic countries linked to insufficient levels of leisure time physical activity and estimate the potential for cancer prevention for these three sites by increasing physical activity levels.
METHODS: Using the Prevent macrosimulation model, the number of cancer cases in the Nordic countries over a 30-year period (2016-2045) was modelled, under different scenarios of increasing physical activity levels in the population, and compared with the projected number of cases if constant physical activity prevailed. Physical activity (moderate and vigorous) was categorised according to metabolic equivalents (MET) hours in groups with sufficient physical activity (15+ MET-hours/week), low deficit (9 to
PubMed ID
30739839 View in PubMed
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Education reduces the effects of genetic susceptibilities to poor physical health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98807
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):406-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Wendy Johnson
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Erik L Mortensen
Axel Skytthe
G David Batty
Ian J Deary
Author Affiliation
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. wendy.johnson@ed.ac.uk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):406-14
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Social Class
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Greater education is associated with better physical health. This has been of great concern to public health officials. Most demonstrations show that education influences mean levels of health. Little is known about the influence of education on variance in health status, or about how this influence may impact the underlying genetic and environmental sources of health problems. This study explored these influences. METHODS: In a 2002 postal questionnaire, 21 522 members of same-sex pairs in the Danish Twin Registry born between 1931 and 1982 reported physical health in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental variance in physical health differed with level of education, adjusting for birth-year effects. RESULTS: and Conclusions As expected, greater education was associated with better physical health. Greater education was also associated with smaller variance in health status. In both sexes, 2 standard deviations (SDs) above mean educational level, variance in physical health was only about half that among those 2 SDs below. This was because fewer highly educated people reported poor health. There was less total variance in health primarily because there was less genetic variance. Education apparently reduced expression of genetic susceptibilities to poor health. The patterns of genetic and environmental correlations suggested that this might take place because more educated people manage their environments to protect their health. If so, fostering the personal charactieristics associated with educational attainment could be important in reducing the education-health gradient.
Notes
RefSource: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):415-6
PubMed ID
19861402 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication. 6. Tuberculin sensitivity after human and bovine infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70196
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1967;36(5):719-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967

Evaluation of the Long-Term Anti-Human Papillomavirus 6 (HPV6), 11, 16, and 18 Immune Responses Generated by the Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302798
Source
Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2015 Aug;22(8):943-8. doi: 10.1128/CVI.00133-15. Epub 2015 Jun 17.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Nygård M
Saah A
Munk C
Tryggvadottir L
Enerly E
Hortlund M
Sigurdardottir LG
Vuocolo S
Kjaer SK
Dillner J
Source
Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2015 Aug;22(8):943-8. doi: 10.1128/CVI.00133-15. Epub 2015 Jun 17.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Iceland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration & dosage
Adolescent
Antibodies, viral
Blood
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Human Papillomavirus Recombinant Vaccine Quadrivalent, Types 6, 11, 16, 18
Humans
Immunology
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulin G
Papillomavirus Infections
Prevention & control
Serum
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) (HPV6, -11, -16, and -18) vaccine long-term follow-up (LTFU) study is an ongoing extension of a pivotal clinical study (FUTURE II) taking place in the Nordic region. The LTFU study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness, immunogenicity, and safety of the qHPV vaccine (Gardasil) for at least 10 years following completion of the base study. The current report presents immunogenicity data from testing samples of the year 5 LTFU visit (approximately 9 years after vaccination). FUTURE II vaccination arm subjects, who consented to being followed in the LTFU, donated serum at regular intervals and in 2012. Anti-HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies were detected by the competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and in addition, serum samples from 2012 were analyzed by the total IgG Luminex immunoassay (LIA) (n = 1,598). cLIA geometric mean titers (GMTs) remained between 70% and 93% of their month 48 value depending on HPV type. For all HPV types, the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the year 9 GMTs remained above the serostatus cutoff value. The proportion of subjects who remained seropositive based on the IgG LIA was higher than the proportion based on cLIA, especially for anti-HPV18. As expected, the anti-HPV serum IgG and cLIA responses were strongly correlated for all HPV types. Anti-HPV GMTs and the proportion of vaccinated individuals who are seropositive remain high for up to 9 years of follow-up after vaccination.
PubMed ID
26084514 View in PubMed
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Hepatitis B immunization coverage and risk behaviour among Danish travellers: are immunization strategies based on single journey itineraries rational?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98254
Source
J Infect. 2010 Apr;60(4):309-10; author reply 310-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Gerard Sonder
Anneke van den Hoek
Source
J Infect. 2010 Apr;60(4):309-10; author reply 310-11
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Services Research
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Risk-Taking
Travel
Vaccination
Notes
RefSource: J Infect. 2009 Nov;59(5):353-9
PubMed ID
20100513 View in PubMed
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Invasive pneumococcal disease in Danish children, 1996-2007, prior to the introduction of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91383
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Feb;98(2):328-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Winther, TN
Kristensen, TD
Kaltoft, MS
Konradsen, HB
Knudsen, JD
Høgh, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. thildewinther@gmail.com
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 Feb;98(2):328-31
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to document the epidemiology, microbiology and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children /=2 years. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that an estimated 75% of all IPD cases among children
PubMed ID
18983440 View in PubMed
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Participation in mass screening for colorectal cancer with fecal occult blood test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26262
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1986 Dec;21(10):1180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
K. Klaaborg
M S Madsen
O. Søndergaard
O. Kronborg
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1986 Dec;21(10):1180-4
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colonic Neoplasms - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Rectal Neoplasms - prevention & control
Abstract
A Danish, randomized study with Hemoccult-II, including 60,000 persons between 45 and 74 years old, began in 1985. Methods of increasing acceptability are described for the first 8000. The first 1000 refusals are also analyzed. Written invitations including prestamped envelopes for return of the slides resulted in an acceptability of 58.8%. Two reminders increased the figure to 65.6%. Personal attempts to change the mind of those refusing increased the last figure to 68.9%. Incomplete slides were returned by 49 persons, but on request 43 sent a complete set. All 78 persons with positive tests had colonoscopy, which detected carcinomas in 10 and adenomas in 39. The study confirmed that results of trials from different countries are difficult to compare because of major differences among populations and methods. However, the present results were similar to those obtained in a Swedish study including only persons between 60 and 64 years old.
PubMed ID
3809993 View in PubMed
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Persistent HPV infection and cervical cancer risk: is the scientific rationale for changing the screening paradigm enough?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100410
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010 Oct 6;102(19):1451-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2010

Researchers in sports medicine are key players in the field of preventive health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100439
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Sep;20(5):338-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Magnus Hagmar
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Sep;20(5):338-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Biomedical research
Denmark
Humans
Primary prevention - methods
Sports Medicine
Notes
RefSource: Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Sep;20(5):355-61
PubMed ID
20818189 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.