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Digitally supported program for type 2 diabetes risk identification and risk reduction in real-world setting: protocol for the StopDia model and randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299265
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Mar 01; 19(1):255
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-01-2019
Author
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Reija Männikkö
Tanja Tilles-Tirkkonen
Leila Karhunen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Ursula Schwab
Niina Lintu
Jussi Paananen
Riia Järvenpää
Marja Harjumaa
Janne Martikainen
Johanna Kohl
Kaisa Poutanen
Miikka Ermes
Pilvikki Absetz
Jaana Lindström
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, 70210, Kuopio, Finland. jussi.pihlajamaki@uef.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Mar 01; 19(1):255
Date
Mar-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - economics - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - economics - methods
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - economics - methods
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - economics - methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Assessment - economics - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The StopDia study is based on the convincing scientific evidence that type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its comorbidities can be prevented by a healthy lifestyle. The need for additional research is based on the fact that the attempts to translate scientific evidence into actions in the real-world health care have not led to permanent and cost-effective models to prevent T2D. The specific aims of the StopDia study following the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework are to 1) improve the Reach of individuals at increased risk, 2) evaluate the Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the digital lifestyle intervention and the digital and face-to-face group lifestyle intervention in comparison to routine care in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and 3) evaluate the Adoption and Implementation of the StopDia model by the participants and the health care organizations at society level. Finally, we will address the Maintenance of the lifestyle changes at participant level and that of the program at organisatory level after the RCT.
The StopDia study is carried out in the primary health care system as part of the routine actions of three provinces in Finland, including Northern Savo, Southern Carelia, and Päijät-Häme. We estimate that one fifth of adults aged 18-70?years living in these areas are at increased risk of T2D. We recruit the participants using the StopDia Digital Screening Tool, including questions from the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC). About 3000 individuals at increased risk of T2D (FINDRISC =12 or a history of gestational diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, or impaired glucose tolerance) participate in the one-year randomized controlled trial. We monitor lifestyle factors using the StopDia Digital Questionnaire and metabolism using laboratory tests performed as part of routine actions in the health care system.
Sustainable and scalable models are needed to reach and identify individuals at increased risk of T2D and to deliver personalized and effective lifestyle interventions. With the StopDia study we aim to answer these challenges in a scientific project that is fully digitally integrated into the routine health care.
ClinicalTials.gov . Identifier: NCT03156478 . Date of registration 17.5.2017.
PubMed ID
30823909 View in PubMed
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The Food4toddlers study - study protocol for a web-based intervention to promote healthy diets for toddlers: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302116
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 May 14; 19(1):563
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
May-14-2019
Author
Margrethe Røed
Elisabet R Hillesund
Frøydis N Vik
Wendy Van Lippevelde
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. margrethe.roed@uia.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 May 14; 19(1):563
Date
May-14-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods - psychology
Humans
Infant
Internet
Male
Mobile Applications
Norway
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Eating habits are established during childhood and track into adolescence and later in life. Given that these habits have a large public health impact and influence the increasing rates of childhood obesity worldwide, there is a need for effective, evidence-based prevention trials promoting healthy eating habits in the first 2?years of life. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the effect of an eHealth intervention called Food4toddlers, aiming to promote healthy dietary habits in toddlers by targeting parents' awareness of their child's food environment (i.e., how food is provided or presented) and eating environment (e.g., feeding practices and social interaction). This paper describes the rationale, development, and evaluation design of this project.
We developed a 6-month eHealth intervention, with the extensive user involvement of health care nurses and parents of toddlers. This intervention is in line with the social cognitive theory, targeting the interwoven relationship between the person, behavior, and environment, with an emphasis on environmental factors. The intervention website includes recipes, information, activities, and collaboration opportunities. The Food4toddlers website can be used as a mobile application. To evaluate the intervention, a two-armed pre-post-follow-up randomized controlled trial is presently being conducted in Norway. Parents of toddlers (n =?404) were recruited via social media (Facebook) and 298 provided baseline data of their toddlers at age 12?months. After baseline measurements, participants were randomly allocated to an intervention group or control group. Primary outcomes are the child's diet quality and food variety. All participants will be followed up at age 18?months, 2?years, and 4?years.
The results of this trial will provide evidence to increase knowledge about the effectiveness of an eHealth intervention targeting parents and their toddler's dietary habits.
ISRCTN92980420 . Registered 13 September 2017. Retrospectively registered.
PubMed ID
31088438 View in PubMed
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Treatment of sleep apnea in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: design and rationale of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299282
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2018 Dec; 52(6):372-377
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Gunn Marit Traaen
Lars Aakerøy
Tove-Elizabeth Hunt
Britt Øverland
Erik Lyseggen
Pål Aukrust
Thor Ueland
Thomas Helle-Valle
Sigurd Steinshamn
Thor Edvardsen
Hasse Khiabani Zaré
Svend Aakhus
Harriet Akre
Ole-Gunnar Anfinsen
Jan Pål Loennechen
Lars Gullestad
Author Affiliation
a Department of Cardiology , Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2018 Dec; 52(6):372-377
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Catheter Ablation
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation is associated with increased mortality as well as morbidity. There is strong evidence for an association between atrial fibrillation and sleep apnea. It is not known whether treatment of sleep apnea with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) will reduce the burden of atrial fibrillation.
The Treatment of Sleep Apnea in Patients with Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation study will investigate the effects of CPAP in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sleep apnea.
The trial has a dual center, randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel design.
Two centers will enroll a total of 100 patients with both paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]?=?15 events/h) who are scheduled for catheter ablation. Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to CPAP or control group (50 patients in each arm). The effects of CPAP treatment on atrial fibrillation will be determined using an implanted loop recorder (Reveal LINQ™, Medtronic) that detects all arrhythmia episodes. The primary endpoint is a reduction of the total burden of atrial fibrillation in the intervention group, after 5 months' follow-up (preablation). Reduction in the arrhythmia recurrence rate after ablation is the main secondary endpoint. All patients will be followed up for 12 months after ablation.
This study is the first randomized controlled trial that will provide data on the effects of CPAP therapy in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sleep apnea. The results are expected to improve our understanding of the interaction between paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and sleep apnea. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT02727192.
PubMed ID
30638392 View in PubMed
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Using mobile phone technology to treat alcohol use disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299594
Source
Trials. 2018 Dec 29; 19(1):709
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Dec-29-2018
Author
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Andreas Lundin
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. anna-karin.danielsson@ki.se.
Source
Trials. 2018 Dec 29; 19(1):709
Date
Dec-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Alcohol Content
Breath Tests - instrumentation
Cell Phone
Humans
Mobile Applications
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Telemedicine - instrumentation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A primary concern within the healthcare system is to make treatment more accessible as well as attractive for the great majority of alcohol-dependent people who feel reluctant to participate in the treatment programs available. This paper presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to test the efficacy of two different technical devices (mobile phone application and breathalyzer) on alcohol consumption.
The study is a three-armed RCT with follow-ups 3 and 6 months after randomization. In total, 375 adults (age 18+ years) diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (AUD) will be invited to participate in a 3-month intervention. The primary outcome is the number of days with heavy drinking, defined as four or more standard drinks (12 g alcohol/drink) and measured by the timeline follow back (TLFB) and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) instruments at 3-month and 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures include weekly alcohol consumption, measured by the TLFB, AUDIT, and phosphatidylethanol in blood values at 3-month and 6-month follow-up (number of days with blood alcohol concentration levels exceeding 60 mg/100 ml).
Improving ways of collecting data on alcohol consumption, as well as the treatment system with regards to AUD, is of vital importance. Mobile phone technology, with associated applications, is widely recognized as a potentially powerful tool in the prevention and management of disease. This study will provide unique knowledge regarding the use of new technology as instruments for measuring alcohol consumption and, also, as a possible way to decrease it.
ISRCTN, ISRCTN14515753 . Registered on 31 May 2018.
PubMed ID
30594232 View in PubMed
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