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Alcohol consumption and mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)-a register-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285995
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 Nov 11;16(1):219
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-11-2016
Author
Mads Phillip Kofoed Grabas
Steen Møller Hansen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Henrik Bøggild
Line Rosenkilde Ullits
Ulrik Deding
Berit Jamie Nielsen
Per Føge Jensen
Charlotte Overgaard
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 Nov 11;16(1):219
Date
Nov-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Alcoholism - mortality - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that compared with abstinence and heavy drinking, moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of mortality among the general population and patients with heart failure and myocardial infarction. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and mortality in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients.
We studied 1,919 first-time CABG patients using data on alcohol consumption and mortality obtained from Danish national registers from March 2006 to October 2011. Alcohol consumption was divided into the following groups: abstainers (0 units/week), moderate consumers (1-14 units/week), moderate-heavy drinkers (15-21 units/week) and heavy drinkers (>21 units/week). Hazard ratios (HR) of all-cause mortality were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis.
The median follow-up was 2.2 years [IQR 2.0]. There were 112 deaths, of which 96 (86 %) were classified as cardiovascular. Adjustments for age and sex showed no increased risk of all-cause mortality for the abstainers (HR 1.61, 95 % CI, 1.00-2.58) and moderate-heavy drinkers (HR 1.40, 95 % CI, 0.73-2.67) compared with moderate consumers. However, heavy drinkers had a high risk of all-cause mortality compared with moderate consumers (HR 2.44, 95 % CI, 1.47-4.04). A full adjustment showed no increase in mortality for the abstainers (HR 1.59, 95 % CI, 0.98-2.57) and moderate-heavy drinkers (HR 1.68, 95 % CI, 0.86-3.29), while heavy drinkers were associated with an increased mortality rate (HR 1.88, 95 % CI, 1.10-3.21). There was no increased risk of 30-day mortality for the abstainers (HR 0.74, 95 % CI, 0.23-2.32), moderate-heavy drinkers (HR 0.36, 95 % CI, 0.07-1.93) and heavy drinkers (HR 2.20, 95 % CI, 0.65-7.36).
There was no increased risk of mortality for abstainers (0 units/week) or moderate-heavy drinkers (15-21 units/week) following a CABG. Only heavy drinking (>21 units/week) were significantly associated with an increased mortality rate. These results suggest that only heavy drinking present a risk factor among CABG patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27835965 View in PubMed
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Associations between follow-up screening after gestational diabetes and early detection of diabetes--a register based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265231
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:841
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christinna Rebecca Olesen
Jane Hyldgaard Nielsen
Rikke Nørmark Mortensen
Henrik Bøggild
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Charlotte Overgaard
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:841
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
General practice
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Income
Laboratories
Mass Screening
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Women whose pregnancy was complicated by gestational diabetes have a 7-fold higher risk of developing diabetes, primarily type 2. Early detection can prevent or delay the onset of late complications, for which follow-up screening is important. This study investigated the extent of participation in follow-up screening and the possible consequences of nonattendance in the Region of North Jutland, Denmark.
In Danish national registers covering the years 1994-2011 we identified 2171 birthing women whose pregnancy was complicated by first-time gestational diabetes. Control visits to general practitioners and biochemical departments after giving birth were charted. Following national guidelines we defined four intervals for assessment of participation in follow-up screening. Diagnosis of diabetes or treatment with glucose-lowering agents after giving birth were also identified. Participation in follow-up screening and risk of diabetes was calculated. Time to obtaining diagnosis of diabetes or initiating treatment was analysed by Cox regression models. All models were adjusted for age, ethnicity and income.
High attendance was found during the first control interval, after which attendance decreased with time after giving birth for both controls at general practitioners and biochemical departments. All differences in proportions were statistically significant. Women attending controls at general practitioners had a significantly higher risk of diabetes diagnosis and treatment after gestational diabetes than women not attending. The results for women attending testing at biochemical departments also showed an increased risk of initiation of treatment. Women attending at least one general practitioners control had a significantly higher risk of early diabetes diagnosis or treatment. Time to initiation of treatment was significantly higher for testing at biochemical departments. Women with high incomes had a significantly lower risk of diabetes diagnosis or initiation of treatment compared to low-income women.
Participation in follow-up screening after gestational diabetes is low in the North Denmark Region. Follow-up screening ensures early detection of diabetes and initiation of treatment. Our results emphasize the importance of development of interventions to improve early detection and prevention of diabetes after gestational diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25115200 View in PubMed
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Benefit of clopidogrel therapy in patients with myocardial infarction and chronic kidney disease-a Danish nation-wide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267083
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Aug;3(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Thalia Marie Blicher
Kristine Hommel
Søren Lund Kristensen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Mette Madsen
Anne-Lise Kamper
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2014 Aug;3(4)
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Denmark
Female
Hemorrhage
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy - surgery
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Renal Dialysis
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - complications
Ticlopidine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate clopidogrel treatment after incident myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD).
By linking nation-wide registries, information about patients admitted with incident MI was found. Primary endpoints were all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, a composite of all-cause mortality and recurrent MI, and a composite of fatal and nonfatal bleedings. Effect of clopidogrel use versus clopidogrel nonuse was estimated using an adjusted Cox's regression model stratified according to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment.A total of 69 082 incident MI patients in the period 2002-2011 were included. Clopidogrel treatment was associated with hazard ratios (HRs) for the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and recurrent MI in PCI-treated patients of 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 1.72) in renal replacement therapy (RRT) patients, 0.59 (95% CI: 0.40 to 0.88) in non-end-stage CKD patients and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.61 to 0.77) in patients without kidney disease (P for interaction=0.60). In patients not treated with PCI, HRs were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.68 to 1.21) in RRT patients, 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.99) in non-end-stage CKD patients, and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87 to 0.95) in patients without kidney disease (P for interaction=0.74). An increase in bleeding events (not significant) was noted for clopidogrel-treated patients not undergoing PCI and for non-end-stage CKD patients undergoing PCI, whereas clopidogrel was associated with less bleedings in PCI-treated RRT patients and patients without kidney disease.
During a 1-year follow-up, after MI, clopidogrel was associated with improved outcomes in patients with non-end-stage CKD. Even though no effect difference, compared to patients without CKD, was observed, the benefit associated with the use of clopidogrel after MI in patients requiring RRT is less clear.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25146707 View in PubMed
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Bleeding after initiation of multiple antithrombotic drugs, including triple therapy, in atrial fibrillation patients following myocardial infarction and coronary intervention: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121881
Source
Circulation. 2012 Sep 4;126(10):1185-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2012
Author
Morten Lamberts
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Martin Huth Ruwald
Carolina Malta Hansen
Deniz Karasoy
Søren Lund Kristensen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Morten Lock Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Post 635, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Niels Andersens Vej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. mortenlamberts@gmail.com
Source
Circulation. 2012 Sep 4;126(10):1185-93
Date
Sep-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - drug therapy - mortality
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - mortality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination - adverse effects
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Hemorrhage - chemically induced - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Stroke - mortality
Ticlopidine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
Vitamin K - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
Uncertainty remains over optimal antithrombotic treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation presenting with myocardial infarction and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. We investigated the risk and time frame for bleeding following myocardial infarction/percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with atrial fibrillation according to antithrombotic treatment.
Patients with atrial fibrillation and admitted with myocardial infarction or for percutaneous coronary intervention between 2000 and 2009 (11 480 subjects, mean age 75.6 years [SD ±10.3], males 60.9%) were identified by individual level linkage of nationwide registries in Denmark. Fatal or nonfatal (requiring hospitalization) bleeding was determined according to antithrombotic treatment regimen: triple therapy (TT) with vitamin K antagonist (VKA)+aspirin+clopidogrel, VKA+antiplatelet, and dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin+clopidogrel. We calculated crude incidence rates and adjusted hazard ratios by Cox regression models. Within 1 year, 728 bleeding events were recorded (6.3%); 79 were fatal (0.7%). Within 30 days, rates were 22.6, 20.3, and 14.3 bleeding events per 100 person-years for TT, VKA+antiplatelet, and dual antiplatelet therapy, respectively. Both early (within 90 days) and delayed (90-360 days) bleeding risk with TT exposure in relation to VKA+antiplatelet was increased; hazard ratio 1.47 (1.04;2.08) and 1.36 (0.95;1.95), respectively. No significant difference in thromboembolic risk was observed for TT versus VKA+antiplatelet; hazard ratio, 1.15 (0.95;1.40).
High risk of bleeding is immediately evident with TT after myocardial infarction/percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with atrial fibrillation. A continually elevated risk associated with TT indicates no safe therapeutic window, and TT should only be prescribed after thorough bleeding risk assessment of patients.
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2013 Apr 30;127(17):e58523762910
Comment In: Circulation. 2012 Sep 4;126(10):1176-822869840
Comment In: Circulation. 2013 Apr 30;127(17):e58423630091
PubMed ID
22869839 View in PubMed
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Cardioversion and Risk of Adverse Events with Dabigatran versus Warfarin-A Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274069
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e0141377
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jannik Langtved Pallisgaard
Tommi Bo Lindhardt
Morten Lock Hansen
Anne-Marie Schjerning
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Laila Staerk
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(10):e0141377
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antithrombins - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dabigatran - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Administration
Humans
Incidence
Male
Registries
Risk
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Warfarin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Cardioversion can rapidly and effectively restore sinus rhythm in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Since 2011 dabigatran has been available as an alternative to warfarin to prevent thromboembolic events in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation undergoing cardioversion. We studied time to cardioversion, risk of adverse events, and risk of readmission with atrial fibrillation after cardioversion according to anticoagulation therapy.
Through the nationwide Danish registries we included 1,230 oral anticoagulation naïve patients with first time non-valvular atrial fibrillation and first time cardioversion from 2011 to 2012; 37% in the dabigatran group (n = 456), and 63% in the warfarin group (n = 774). Median time to cardioversion was 4.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.9 to 6.5) and 6.9 (IQR 3.9 to 12.1) weeks in the dabigatran and warfarin groups respectively, and the adjusted odds ratio of cardioversion within the first 4 weeks was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 3.1) in favor of dabigatran. The cumulative incidence of composite endpoint of stroke, bleeding or death were 2.0% and 1.0% at 30 weeks in the warfarin and dabigatran groups respectively, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.33 (95% CI 0.33 to 5.42). Cumulative incidence of readmission with atrial fibrillation after 30 weeks were 9% and 11% in the warfarin and dabigatran groups, respectively, and an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.41 to 1.08).
Anticoagulation treatment with dabigatran allows shorter time to cardioversion for atrial fibrillation than warfarin, and appears to be an effective and safe alternative treatment strategy to warfarin.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26513589 View in PubMed
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Comparison of antiplatelet regimens in secondary stroke prevention: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273512
Source
BMC Neurol. 2015;15:225
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Christine Benn Christiansen
Jannik Pallisgaard
Thomas Alexander Gerds
Jonas Bjerring Olesen
Mads Emil Jørgensen
Anna Karin Numé
Nicholas Carlson
Søren Lund Kristensen
Gunnar Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Source
BMC Neurol. 2015;15:225
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aspirin - adverse effects
Brain Ischemia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cerebral Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dipyridamole - adverse effects
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects
Recurrence
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ticlopidine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
Abstract
In patients with ischemic stroke of non-cardioembolic origin, acetylsalicylic acid, clopidogrel, or a combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole are recommended for the prevention of a recurrent stroke. The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of bleeding or recurrent stroke associated with these three treatments.
Patients who were discharged with first-time ischemic stroke from 2007-2010, with no history of atrial fibrillation were identified from Danish nationwide registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 1-year risks of recurrent ischemic stroke and bleeding were calculated for each antiplatelet regimen.
Among patients discharged after first-time ischemic stroke, 3043 patients were treated with acetylsalicylic acid, 12,295 with a combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole, and 3885 with clopidogrel. Adjusted HRs for clopidogrel versus the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole were 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89-1.17) for ischemic stroke and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.83-1.35) for bleeding. Adjusted HRs for acetylsalicylic acid versus the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole were 1.48 (95% CI: 1.31-1.67) for stroke and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.18-1.82) for bleeding. Clopidogrel versus acetylsalicylic acid yielded HRs of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.59-0.81) and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.55-0.96) for stroke and bleeding, respectively. The 1-year predicted risks associated with acetylsalicylic acid, the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole, and clopidogrel were 11.1 (95% CI: 10.2-12.2), 7.7 (95% CI: 7.3-8.3), and 8.0 (95% CI: 6.9-8.7) for ischemic stroke, respectively; while, the risks for bleeding were 3.4 (95% CI: 2.8-3.9), 2.4 (95% CI: 2.1-2.7), and 2.4 (95% CI: 1.9-2.9), respectively.
Clopidogrel and the combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole were associated with similar risks for recurrent ischemic stroke and bleeding; whereas acetylsalicylic acid was associated with higher risks for both ischemic stroke and bleeding. The latter finding may partially be explained by selection bias.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26525411 View in PubMed
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Discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction and short term risk of adverse cardiovascular events: nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125794
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e1802
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ditte-Marie Bretler
Peter Riis Hansen
Rikke Sørensen
Jesper Lindhardsen
Ole Ahlehoff
Charlotte Andersson
Steen Zabell Abildstrøm
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar Hilmar Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. dimabr01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e1802
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Postmenopause
Prognosis
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
To assess the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in women who discontinue hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction compared with those who continue.
Nationwide register based cohort study.
All hospitals in Denmark.
All 3322 women aged 40 years or over who survived 30 days after a myocardial infarction and were prescribed hormone replacement therapy at the time of myocardial infarction in the period 1997 to 2008.
Reinfarction, cardiovascular mortality, and all cause mortality 30 to 360 days after discharge.:
A total of 282 (8.5%) women had a reinfarction, 218 (6.6%) died of cardiovascular causes, and 357 (10.7%) died of any cause during follow-up. Women who discontinued overall hormone replacement therapy in the first year after myocardial infarction did not have a significantly different risk of reinfarction (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.19), cardiovascular mortality (1.21, 0.90 to 1.62), or all cause mortality (1.22, 0.97 to 1.53) than women who continued use. However, discontinuation of vaginal oestrogen was associated with a lower risk of reinfarction (hazard ratio 0.54, 0.34 to 0.86).
No certain conclusions can be drawn regarding increased or decreased risk of adverse cardiovascular events with continuing hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction. The results rule out neither a modest benefit nor a worrisome increase in risk. These figures may be valuable when a possible cardiovascular risk of hormone replacement therapy needs to be balanced with menopausal symptoms for the individual patient.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22453184 View in PubMed
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Duration of clopidogrel treatment and risk of mortality and recurrent myocardial infarction among 11 680 patients with myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145748
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2010;10:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Rikke Sørensen
Steen Z Abildstrom
Peter Weeke
Emil L Fosbøl
Fredrik Folke
Morten L Hansen
Peter R Hansen
Jan K Madsen
Ulrik Abildgaard
Lars Køber
Henrik E Poulsen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Niels Andersens Vej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. rs@heart.dk
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2010;10:6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - mortality - trends
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality - prevention & control
Recurrence - prevention & control
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Ticlopidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The optimal duration of clopidogrel treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is unclear. We studied the risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) in relation to 6- and 12-months clopidogrel treatment among MI patients treated with PCI.
Using nationwide registers of hospitalizations and drug dispensing from pharmacies we identified 11 680 patients admitted with MI, treated with PCI and clopidogrel. Clopidogrel treatment was categorized in a 6-months and a 12-months regimen. Rates of death, recurrent MI or a combination of both were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Bleedings were compared between treatment regimens.
The Kaplan Meier analysis indicated no benefit of the 12-months regimen compared with the 6-months in all endpoints. The Cox proportional hazards analysis confirmed these findings with hazard ratios for the 12-months regimen (the 6-months regimen used as reference) for the composite endpoint of 1.01 (confidence intervals 0.81-1.26) and 1.24 (confidence intervals 0.95-1.62) for Day 0-179 and Day 180-540 after discharge. Bleedings occurred in 3.5% and 4.1% of the patients in the 6-months and 12-months regimen (p = 0.06).
We found comparable rates of death and recurrent MI in patients treated with 6- and 12-months' clopidogrel. The potential benefit of prolonged clopidogrel treatment in a real-life setting remains uncertain.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20113477 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of post-operative clopidogrel treatment in patients revascularized with coronary artery bypass grafting after myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136521
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Mar 8;57(10):1202-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-2011
Author
Rikke Sørensen
Steen Z Abildstrøm
Peter R Hansen
Anders Hvelplund
Charlotte Andersson
Mette Charlot
Emil L Fosbøl
Lars Køber
Jan K Madsen
Gunnar H Gislason
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. rs@heart.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Mar 8;57(10):1202-9
Date
Mar-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hemorrhage - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality - surgery
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Postoperative Period
Propensity Score
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence - prevention & control
Registries
Ticlopidine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the clinical efficacy of clopidogrel treatment on death and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) among MI patients revascularized by coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG).
The benefit from post-operative clopidogrel in CABG-treated MI patients is largely unknown.
All patients admitted with first-time MI between 2002 and 2006, treated with CABG within 180 days after admission, were identified by nationwide administrative registers. Clopidogrel treatment was determined by claimed prescriptions after discharge from surgery. Risk of death or recurrent MI, and of a combined end point of the 2, were assessed by cumulative incidence and Cox proportional hazards model. A propensity score-matched subgroup analysis was done.
We included 3,545 patients, and of these, 957 (27.0%) were treated with clopidogrel after CABG. Mean follow-up was 466 ± 144 days. Among patients treated with clopidogrel, 39 (4.1%) died or experienced a recurrent MI, whereas that occurred in 203 (7.8%) patients without clopidogrel (log-rank p = 0.0003). Hazard ratio was 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42 to 0.85) for patients treated with clopidogrel, with no-clopidogrel as reference. By propensity score, of 945 patients with or without clopidogrel treatment who were matched, death or recurrent MI occurred in 38 (4.0%) patients with clopidogrel and 57 (6.0%) without clopidogrel (log-rank p = 0.05). Corresponding hazard ratio was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.44 to 1.00) for clopidogrel users, with no-clopidogrel as reference.
Among MI patients revascularized by CABG, only 27% received clopidogrel after discharge. Clopidogrel-treated patients had a lower risk of the combined end point of death or recurrent MI. Focus on discharge clopidogrel treatment of these patients should be made.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Aug 30;58(10):1085; author reply 1085-621867852
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Aug 30;58(10):1084-5; author reply 1085-621867851
PubMed ID
21371637 View in PubMed
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Fish, n-3 fatty acids, and cardiovascular diseases in women of reproductive age: a prospective study in a large national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129052
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Jan;59(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Marin Strøm
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Erik L Mortensen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Sjurdur F Olsen
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. mrm@ssi.dk
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Jan;59(1):36-43
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cerebrovascular Disorders - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutrition Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Seafood
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated a protective effect of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn3FAs) against cardiovascular disease; however, women are underrepresented in cardiovascular research. The aim of this study was to explore the association between intake of LCn3FAs and the risk of cardiovascular disease in a large prospective cohort of young women (mean age at baseline: 29.9 years [range: 15.7-46.9]). Exposure information on 48 627 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort was linked to the Danish National Patients Registry for information on events of hypertensive, cerebrovascular, and ischemic heart disease used to define a combined measure of cardiovascular diseases. Intake of fish and LCn3FAs was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and telephone interviews. During follow-up (1996-2008; median: 8 years), 577 events of cardiovascular disease were identified. Low LCn3FA intake was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (adjusted hazard ratio for women in lowest versus highest LCn3FA intake group: 1.91 [95% CI: 1.26-2.90]). Restricting the sample to women who had consistently reported similar frequencies of fish intake across 3 different dietary assessment occasions tended to strengthen the relationship (hazard ratio for lowest versus highest intake: 2.91 [95% CI: 1.45-5.85]). Furthermore, the observed associations were consistent in supplementary analyses where LCn3FA intake was averaged across the 3 dietary assessment occasions, and the associations were persistent for all 3 of the individual outcomes. Our findings based on a large prospective cohort of relatively young and initially healthy women indicated that little or no intake of fish and LCn3FAs was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
22146511 View in PubMed
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