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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Additive preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57405
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
B. Christenson
J. Hedlund
P. Lundbergh
A. Ortqvist
Author Affiliation
Dept of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm County, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):363-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
In 1999, all individuals > or = 65 yrs of age (n=258,754) in Stockholm County, Sweden, were offered influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in a prospective study on the effectiveness of these vaccines in reducing the need for hospital treatment and death due to influenza, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during 1 yr were obtained from the administrative database in Stockholm County Council. Vaccination was performed in 124,702 (48%) subjects; 72,107 had both vaccines, 29,346 only had the influenza vaccine and 23,249 only had the pneumococcal vaccine. Compared with the unvaccinated cohort, a lower incidence of hospitalisation for all endpoint diagnoses was seen in vaccinated persons. An additive effectiveness of vaccination was seen when both vaccines were given, with a reduction of hospital admissions for influenza (37%), pneumonia (29%) and IPD (44%). In-hospital mortality for pneumonia was significantly lower in those who received both vaccines, than in unvaccinated persons. To conclude, vaccination with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines together was effective in reducing the need for hospital admission for influenza and pneumonia. There was a strong indication that pneumococcal vaccination alone, was effective not only in the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease, but also of pneumonia overall, although to a low degree.
PubMed ID
15065822 View in PubMed
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[A new strategy in the fight against HIV/AIDS is needed. Inaccurate information is a waste of both money and energy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7631
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Nov 18;95(47):5300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-1998

[An outbreak of giardiasis among children in family day nurseries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36778
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 4;89(10):764-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1992

[An outbreak of measles in a vaccinated community--a new situation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288218
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 12;87(50):4298, 4303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1990

[An outbreak of measles in a vaccinated community--a new situation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37450
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 12;87(50):4298, 4303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1990

[Children with multiresistant pneumococci. "Keep the carriers out of day care centers"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35591
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Nov 30;91(48):4545-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1994

Compulsory measures to combat spread of HIV in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7965
Source
Lancet. 1994 Jul 2;344(8914):62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-1994

Effects of a large-scale intervention with influenza and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines in adults aged 65 years or older: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57488
Source
Lancet. 2001 Mar 31;357(9261):1008-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2001
Author
B. Christenson
P. Lundbergh
J. Hedlund
A. Ortqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. brith.christenson@sme.sll.se
Source
Lancet. 2001 Mar 31;357(9261):1008-11
Date
Mar-31-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Influenza Vaccines
Influenza, Human - mortality - prevention & control
Male
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - mortality - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Streptococcal Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in the prevention of hospital admissions and death has not been assessed prospectively. We have therefore examined the effects of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in individuals aged 65 years and older in a 3-year prospective study, between Dec 1, 1998 and May 31, 1999. METHODS: All individuals in Stockholm County aged 65 years or older (259,627) were invited to take part in a vaccination campaign against influenza and pneumococcal infection. We recorded for all vaccine recipients (100,242) name, and date of birth, and whether they had been given both or one of the vaccines. All individuals (> or = 65 years) admitted to hospital in Stockholm County with influenza and pneumonia related diagnoses were identified between Dec 1, 1998, and May 31, 1999. FINDINGS: The incidence (per 100,000 inhabitants per year) of hospital treatment was lower in the vaccinated than in the unvaccinated cohort for all diagnoses: 263 versus 484 (-46% [95% CI 34-56]) for influenza; 2199 versus 3097 (-29% [24-34)) for pneumonia; 64 versus 100 (-36% [3-58]) for pneumococcal pneumonia; and 20 versus 40 (-52% [1-77]) for invasive pneumococcal disease. The total mortality was 57% (55-60) lower in vaccinated than in unvaccinated individuals (15.1 vs 34.7 deaths per 1000 inhabitants). INTERPRETATION: These findings show that general vaccination leads to substantial health benefits and to a reduction of mortality from all causes in this age group.
PubMed ID
11293594 View in PubMed
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Effects of a large-scale intervention with influenza and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines in elderly people: a 1-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57424
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Sep 8;21(25-26):3906-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-8-2003
Author
J. Hedlund
B. Christenson
P. Lundbergh
A. Ortqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden. jonas.hedlund@ks.se
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Sep 8;21(25-26):3906-11
Date
Sep-8-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Cohort Studies
Endpoint Determination
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunization Programs
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Male
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
To assess the effectiveness of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and deaths in elderly people, the population aged > or =65 years in Stockholm County, Sweden (n = 259627) were invited to take part in a vaccination campaign with influenza and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PV). A no. of persons (100,242) (vaccinated cohort) were vaccinated with one or both vaccines during the campaign. The incidence of hospital admissions during 1 year after the vaccination campaign, adjusted for sex and age, was significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the unvaccinated cohort for influenza (relative risk [RR] 0.68), pneumonia (RR 0.78), and invasive pneumococcal disease (RR 0.46). In the vaccinated cohort, the in-hospital mortality was lower for pneumonia (RR 0.55), COPD (RR 0.53) and cardiac failure (RR 0.72).
PubMed ID
12922125 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological aspects of acute viral hepatitis A in Swedish travellers to endemic areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39648
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
B. Christenson
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(1):5-10
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa
Asia
Child
Europe
Female
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - prevention & control
Homosexuality
Humans
Immunization, Passive
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden - ethnology
Travel
Abstract
A decreased incidence of hepatitis A (HA) in Swedish travellers to the northern part of the Mediterranean area was observed after 1972, from 1/3 000 travellers who did not receive gammaglobulin in the period 1970-72 to 1/14 200 travellers between 1979 and 1981 and 1/20 000 travellers in 1982. No such decrease in incidence was observed in travellers going to the southern part of the Mediterranean area. Differences in the incidences of HA in travellers to individual countries in southern Europe were also noticed. The risk of Swedish travellers to remote destinations, such as tropical Africa and Asia, contracting HA is still very high, being 1/150-100 travellers not receiving gammaglobulin. It was observed that years with high incidences of HA in travellers to certain destinations also saw increased incidences of HA in Sweden.
PubMed ID
3992205 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.