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23 records – page 1 of 3.

[An epidemiologic and traumatologic analysis of injuries at a basketball club in Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233595
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Jan 18;150(3):142-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1988

[Are preventive home visits to the elderly by district nurses sensible? The debate in The Netherlands and research abroad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233544
Source
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr. 1988 Feb;19(1):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
H J van Rossum
C M Frederiks
Author Affiliation
Rijksuniversiteit Limburg, Vakgroep Epidemiologie en Gezondheidszorgonderzoek.
Source
Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr. 1988 Feb;19(1):3-6
Date
Feb-1988
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Hospitalization
House Calls
Humans
Mortality
Netherlands
Preventive Health Services
Public health nursing
Random Allocation
Wales
Abstract
There has been a tradition of preventive home visiting to the elderly by Public Health Nurses for quite a time. There is no agreement as to the effect of these visits; until now no study has been performed on this topic in the Netherlands. Studies from other countries suggest a positive effect: viz. a reduction in mortality and hospital admissions. Recommendations for a replication study in the Netherlands are made.
PubMed ID
3282346 View in PubMed
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[Cancer control in foreign countries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28475
Source
Tijdschr Ziekenverpl. 1970 Mar 31;23(7):347-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-1970
Source
Tijdschr Ziekenverpl. 1970 Mar 31;23(7):347-50
Date
Mar-31-1970
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Egypt
India
Iran
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Norway
PubMed ID
5201281 View in PubMed
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[Crash injuries of children in cars. Children sitting on an adult's knees]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38570
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Jan 18;150(3):166-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1988

[Duration of follow-up after contact with HIV: 3 or 6 months]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7247
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2004 Jan 31;148(5):238-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2004
Author
J M Galama
A C Kroes
Author Affiliation
Universitair Medisch Centrum St Radboud, afd. Medische Microbiologie/HP440, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen. j.galama@mmb.umcn.nl
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2004 Jan 31;148(5):238-9
Date
Jan-31-2004
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
English Abstract
HIV Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines - standards
Risk factors
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - drug therapy - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
The revised Netherlands guideline 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes' recommends shortening of the follow-up period from 6 to 3 months for HIV-testing after a risky contact and a period of 6 months in case of post-exposure prophylaxis. The newly adopted follow-up period has a precedent in Sweden, where, based on the same scientific arguments, the follow-up period has been reduced to 3 months. There is little scientific information on which to base the optimal duration of the follow-up period. Therefore, two different periods are used in the Netherlands: 3 months for medical practice in the field of sexually transmitted diseases and 6 months for occupational exposure of health care workers and for blood products.
PubMed ID
14983582 View in PubMed
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[Fortification of food with folic acid diminishes the number of neural tube defects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158460
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2008 Jan 26;152(4):185-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-2008
Author
I A Brouwer
Author Affiliation
Vrije Universiteit, Instituut voor Gezondheidswetenschappen, afd. Voeding en Gezondheid, De Boelelaan 0085, 1081 HV Amsterdam. ingeborg.brouwer@falw.vu.nl
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2008 Jan 26;152(4):185-6
Date
Jan-26-2008
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Food, Fortified
Health promotion
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
A recent study from a research group from Quebec showed a strong decrease in the number of births affected by a neural tube defect since folic acid fortification was introduced in Canada. The prevalence decreased from 1.58 neural tube defects per 1000 births before the introduction of folic acid fortification to 0.86 per 1000 births in the period of complete fortification. Although folic acid fortification of staple food is probably the most effective way to decrease the incidence of neural tube defects, more knowledge about possible health risks should be obtained before fortification is introduced. More research is needed to determine which population groups are at risk of possible negative effects of folic acid fortification and at which level of fortification. Until then, it is important to generate more attention and publicity in order to increase awareness and knowledge concerning folic acid and to promote its use before and after conception.
PubMed ID
18320941 View in PubMed
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[Fortification of food with vitamin D is a reasonable approach to fracture prophylaxis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81882
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 May 27;150(21):1180
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-2006
Author
Lips P.
Author Affiliation
VU Medisch Centrum, afd Inwendige Geneeskunde, Amsterdam.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 May 27;150(21):1180
Date
May-27-2006
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - pathology
Dairy Products
Food, Fortified
Fractures, Bone - prevention & control
Humans
Immobilization - adverse effects
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Vitamin-D deficiency is common in immobile elderly and non-Western immigrants and has been related to muscle weakness in these populations. When serum calcidiol concentrations are below 50 nmol/l, parathyroid hormone concentrations increase, causing bone resorption. Bone mineral density and proximal muscle strength increase as the serum concentration ofcalcidiol increases. Vitamin-D supplementation is reported to reduce the incidence of fractures in nursing home residents. Dutch guidelines recommend vitamin-D supplementation for nursing home residents and for those who are house-bound. Fortification of milk and other foods with vitamin D in the United States and Sweden has led to a better nutritional state with respect to vitamin D than in the Netherlands. Therefore the dairy industry should be allowed to add vitamin D to dairy products to prevent fractures.
Notes
Comment On: Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 May 27;150(21):118116768282
PubMed ID
16768281 View in PubMed
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[Liability for professional mistakes--the breaking through a taboo?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228568
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1990 Aug 18;134(33):1583-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-18-1990
Author
L. Offerhaus
Author Affiliation
Wereldgezondheidsorganisatie, Regionaal kantoor voor Europa, Kopenhagen.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1990 Aug 18;134(33):1583-5
Date
Aug-18-1990
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Great Britain
Humans
Iatrogenic Disease - prevention & control
Insurance, Liability - economics
Malpractice - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Netherlands
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
2395482 View in PubMed
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[Locoregional radiotherapy after mastectomy not useful for all Dutch breast cancer patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21158
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1999 Jan 9;143(2):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1999
Author
J W Leer
C J van de Velde
Author Affiliation
Academisch Ziekenhuis, afd. Radiotherapie, Nijmegen.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1999 Jan 9;143(2):73-5
Date
Jan-9-1999
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Axilla
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Disease-Free Survival
English Abstract
Female
Guidelines - standards
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy - methods
Middle Aged
Neck Dissection - methods
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - prevention & control
Neoplasm Staging
Netherlands
Patient Selection
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - methods - standards
Risk assessment
Abstract
Two recent randomized clinical trials from Denmark and Canada show that postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients in whom the findings revealed a high risk of dying from the disease not only causes improvement of the locoregional tumour control but also prolongs survival. However, this does not establish definitely which patients belong to this 'high risk category'. Results of retrospective studies from Leiden suggest that selective withholding of postoperative radiotherapy in the Netherlands is justified for large groups of breast cancer patients. Both clinically manifest parasternal recurrences and axillary recurrences are rare among these patients. The condition is, however, that the axillary dissection is radical and performed properly.
Notes
Comment On: Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1999 Jan 9;143(2):71-310086106
PubMed ID
10086107 View in PubMed
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[Long-term anticoagulant treatment following an acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55325
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1990 Oct 13;134(41):1984-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-1990
Author
P F van Bergen
Author Affiliation
ASPECT Coördinatiecentrum, Rotterdam.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1990 Oct 13;134(41):1984-5
Date
Oct-13-1990
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Netherlands
Norway
Recurrence
Time Factors
Warfarin - therapeutic use
PubMed ID
2234160 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.