Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31906 records – page 1 of 3191.

1H-NMR metabolomic biomarkers of poor outcome after hemorrhagic shock are absent in hibernators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267428
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lori K Bogren
Carl J Murphy
Erin L Johnston
Neeraj Sinha
Natalie J Serkova
Kelly L Drew
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Hibernation
Lipids - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolome
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reperfusion Injury - blood - prevention & control
Sciuridae
Shock, Hemorrhagic - blood - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hemorrhagic shock (HS) following trauma is a leading cause of death among persons under the age of 40. During HS the body undergoes systemic warm ischemia followed by reperfusion during medical intervention. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) results in a disruption of cellular metabolic processes that ultimately lead to tissue and organ dysfunction or failure. Resistance to I/R injury is a characteristic of hibernating mammals. The present study sought to identify circulating metabolites in the rat as biomarkers for metabolic alterations associated with poor outcome after HS. Arctic ground squirrels (AGS), a hibernating species that resists I/R injury independent of decreased body temperature (warm I/R), was used as a negative control.
Male Sprague-Dawley rats and AGS were subject to HS by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg and maintaining the low MAP for 20 min before reperfusing with Ringers. The animals' temperature was maintained at 37 ? 0.5 ?C for the duration of the experiment. Plasma samples were taken immediately before hemorrhage and three hours after reperfusion. Hydrophilic and lipid metabolites from plasma were then analyzed via 1H-NMR from unprocessed plasma and lipid extracts, respectively. Rats, susceptible to I/R injury, had a qualitative shift in their hydrophilic metabolic fingerprint including differential activation of glucose and anaerobic metabolism and had alterations in several metabolites during I/R indicative of metabolic adjustments and organ damage. In contrast, I/R injury resistant AGS, regardless of season or body temperature, maintained a stable metabolic homeostasis revealed by a qualitative 1H-NMR metabolic profile with few changes in quantified metabolites during HS-induced global I/R.
An increase in circulating metabolites indicative of anaerobic metabolism and activation of glycolytic pathways is associated with poor prognosis after HS in rats. These same biomarkers are absent in AGS after HS with warm I/R.
Notes
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Feb;298(2):R329-4019923364
Cites: Gerontology. 2010;56(2):220-3019602865
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2011 Nov;301(5):R1440-5221865542
Cites: Transplantation. 2011 Dec 15;92(11):1215-2122082817
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Sep 15;184(6):647-5521680948
Cites: Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Feb;133(2):230-5522138603
Cites: Bioanalysis. 2012 Feb;4(3):321-4122303835
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Feb;83(2):253-821864484
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2012 May;162(1-3):1-922326449
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2012 Jul;40(Web Server issue):W127-3322553367
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2012 Jul 15;44(14):717-2722643061
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Sep;83(9):1166-7222353638
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2013 May;238(5):539-4823856905
Cites: J Surg Res. 2014 Jan;186(1):338-4524124975
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e9422524728042
Cites: Jpn J Pharmacol. 2001 Oct;87(2):143-5011700013
Cites: Am J Surg. 2001 Nov;182(5):481-511754855
Cites: J Comp Physiol B. 2010 Apr;180(4):599-61719967378
Cites: J Trauma. 2010 Jul;69(1):31-4020622576
Cites: J Surg Res. 2010 Nov;164(1):e131-920855081
Cites: Shock. 2010 Dec;34(6):565-7220386494
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol Part D Genomics Proteomics. 2010 Dec;5(4):265-7320728417
Cites: Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2011 Jan;300(1):L4-L1120889676
Cites: J Exp Biol. 2011 Apr 15;214(Pt 8):1300-621430207
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2011 Jul 14;43(13):799-80721540299
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2702122046435
Cites: Jpn J Pharmacol. 2002 May;89(1):36-4312083741
Cites: Horm Behav. 2003 Feb;43(2):318-2612694642
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2003 May;24(4):413-2212745044
Cites: Surgery. 2003 Aug;134(2):267-7412947328
Cites: Biol Reprod. 1988 Apr;38(3):616-223378074
Cites: J Comp Physiol B. 1988;158(1):25-373385059
Cites: Science. 1989 Jun 30;244(4912):1593-52740905
Cites: J Lipid Res. 1993 Jun;34(6):1009-198354948
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1994 Mar;14(2):193-2058113316
Cites: Anal Chem. 1995 Mar 1;67(5):793-8117762816
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1998 Feb;18(2):168-759469159
Cites: Kidney Int. 2005 Mar;67(3):1142-5115698456
Cites: Physiol Rev. 2003 Oct;83(4):1153-8114506303
Cites: Annu Rev Physiol. 2004;66:239-7414977403
Cites: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2005 Mar;288(3):G473-8015701622
Cites: Chem Res Toxicol. 2005 Apr;18(4):639-5415833024
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2005;25:469-9716011475
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2005 Dec;101(6):1577-8316301222
Cites: J Hepatol. 2006 May;44(5):956-6216223541
Cites: Stroke. 2006 May;37(5):1261-516574920
Cites: Surgery. 2006 Sep;140(3):404-1216934602
Cites: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2006 Nov;291(5):G895-90116751173
Cites: J Surg Res. 2007 Jan;137(1):96-10217064732
Cites: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007 Mar-Apr;31(2):94-10017308249
Cites: Bioessays. 2007 May;29(5):431-4017450592
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 2007 Aug;62(4):381-917824299
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2007 Sep 19;31(1):15-2417536023
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2008 Jul;28(7):1307-1918398417
Cites: J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2008 Jul;115(7):1011-718478178
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2008 Jul;295(1):R316-2818434441
Cites: Allergol Int. 2008 Sep;57(3):211-718566550
Cites: Crit Care. 2008;12(4):21818638356
Cites: Shock. 2009 Jan;31(1):40-918497709
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2009 Feb;296(2):R383-9319052316
Cites: Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2008;2008:4891-419163813
Cites: Brain Res Rev. 2009 Mar;59(2):293-31518845187
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2009 Jul;37(Web Server issue):W652-6019429898
Cites: J Neurochem. 2009 Aug;110(4):1170-919493168
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2009 Sep;234(9):1011-919546346
Cites: Mol Biosyst. 2010 Jan;6(1):215-2420024083
PubMed ID
25211248 View in PubMed
Less detail

1-year retention and social function after buprenorphine-assisted relapse prevention treatment for heroin dependence in Sweden: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186500
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2003
Author
Johan Kakko
Kerstin Dybrandt Svanborg
Mary Jeanne Kreek
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Date
Feb-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Counseling
Female
Heroin Dependence - classification - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Group
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The partial opiate-receptor agonist buprenorphine has been suggested for treatment of heroin dependence, but there are few long-term and placebo-controlled studies of its effectiveness. We aimed to assess the 1-year efficacy of buprenorphine in combination with intensive psychosocial therapy for treatment of heroin dependence.
40 individuals aged older than 20 years, who met DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence for at least 1 year, but did not fulfil Swedish legal criteria for methadone maintenance treatment were randomly allocated either to daily buprenorphine (fixed dose 16 mg sublingually for 12 months; supervised daily administration for a least 6 months, possible take-home doses thereafter) or a tapered 6 day regimen of buprenorphine, thereafter followed by placebo. All patients participated in cognitive-behavioural group therapy to prevent relapse, received weekly individual counselling sessions, and submitted thrice weekly supervised urine samples for analysis to detect illicit drug use. Our primary endpoint was 1-year retention in treatment and analysis was by intention to treat.
1-year retention in treatment was 75% and 0% in the buprenorphine and placebo groups, respectively (p=0.0001; risk ratio 58.7 [95% CI 7.4-467.4]). Urine screens were about 75% negative for illicit opiates, central stimulants, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines in the patients remaining in treatment.
The combination of buprenorphine and intensive psychosocial treatment is safe and highly efficacious, and should be added to the treatment options available for individuals who are dependent on heroin.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1907; author reply 1907-812788596
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):634-512606172
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1906-7; author reply 1907-812788595
PubMed ID
12606177 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-dose regimen of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine with the immune stimulant AS04 compared with the standard 3-dose regimen of Engerix-B in healthy young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56626
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
K. Levie
I. Gjorup
P. Skinhøj
M. Stoffel
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Belgium
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization - methods
Immunization Schedule
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
An open-label randomized study was undertaken to compare a 2-dose regimen (Months 0 and 6) of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine formulated with a novel adjuvant (HBsAg/AS04) with a standard 3-dose regimen (Months 0, 1 and 6) of licensed recombinant HBsAg vaccine in terms of immunogenicity and reactogenicity when administered to healthy subjects aged between 15 and 40 y. At 1 and 6 months after the full vaccination course there was a 100% seroprotection rate (anti-HBs > or = 10 mIU/ml) with the HBsAg/AS04 vaccine, compared with a 99% response rate with the licensed vaccine. The corresponding geometric mean titres were significantly higher for the novel vaccine compared to the standard vaccine: 15,468 and 2,745 mIU/ml at Months 7 and 12 vs. 6,274 and 1,883 mIU/ml, respectively. There was a higher prevalence of local symptoms with the adjuvant vaccine (90% of doses) than with the standard vaccine (48% of doses). However, these symptoms (pain, swelling and redness) were predominantly of mild-to-moderate intensity and resolved rapidly without treatment. A 2-dose regimen of the new HBsAg/AS04 adjuvant vaccine therefore compared favourably to the standard regimen in healthy young adults. It is anticipated that the simplified vaccination schedule may improve compliance and reduce costs.
PubMed ID
12238579 View in PubMed
Less detail

2nd-generation HIV surveillance and injecting drug use: uncovering the epidemiological ice-berg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84543
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Reintjes Ralf
Wiessing Lucas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty Life Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg, Germany. Ralf.Reintjes@rzbd.haw-hamburg.de
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Europe - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Turkey - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: HIV/AIDS surveillance methods are under revision as the diversity of HIV epidemics is becoming more apparent. The so called "2nd generation surveillance (SGS) systems" aim to enhance surveillance by broadening the range of indicators to prevalence, behaviors and correlates, for a better understanding and a more complete and timely awareness of evolving epidemics. METHODS: Concepts of HIV SGS are reviewed with a special focus on injecting drug users, a major at-risk and hard to reach group in Europe, a region with mainly low or concentrated epidemics. RESULTS: The scope of HIV/AIDS surveillance needs to be broadened following principles of SGS. Specifically for IDUs we propose including hepatitis C data as indicator for injecting risk in routine systems like those monitoring sexually transmitted infections and information on knowledge and attitudes as potential major determinants of risk behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested approach should lead to more complete and timely information for public health interventions, however there is a clear need for comparative validation studies to assess the validity, reliability and cost-effectiveness of traditional and enhanced HIV/AIDS surveillance systems.
PubMed ID
17958283 View in PubMed
Less detail

2-year clinical performance of a fluoride-containing fissure sealant in young schoolchildren at caries risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34233
Source
Am J Dent. 1997 Jun;10(3):115-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Carlsson
M. Petersson
S. Twetman
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Clinic, Vallås, Sweden.
Source
Am J Dent. 1997 Jun;10(3):115-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - analysis - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Colony Count, Microbial
Composite Resins - chemistry - therapeutic use
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Fluorides - analysis - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Humans
Lactobacillus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Saliva - chemistry - microbiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcus mutans - drug effects - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical performance of Helioseal-F, a fluoride-containing fissure sealant, in school children at caries risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A caries risk assessment based on past caries experience, saliva microbial tests, buffer capacity and frequency of sugar intake was carried out in 204 healthy children, 6-7 years of age. Children exhibiting one or more risk factors were considered at caries risk (n = 121) and their permanent molars were sealed with a fluoride-containing fissure sealant, thus forming a fissure sealant group (FSG). The remaining 83 children with low caries risk received no fissure sealants and constituted a reference group (RG). Both groups were followed for 2 years. From 15 children of both groups, unstimulated whole saliva was collected 1 month after sealant placement in order to determine fluoride levels. In another 20 children, a split-mouth study design was utilized to compare the colonization of mutans streptococci adjacent to and on F-containing sealants and conventional controls. The sealants were placed by dental hygienists according to the manufacturers' instructions. RESULTS: A total of 431 fissure sealants were placed at baseline. Complete retention was found in 76.6% during the study period while 22.0% were partially lost. Six sealants (1.4%) were completely lost. The enamel caries incidence was 45% lower (P
PubMed ID
9545884 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-year community-randomized controlled trial of fluoride varnish to prevent early childhood caries in Aboriginal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157658
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Herenia P Lawrence
Darlene Binguis
Jan Douglas
Lynda McKeown
Bonita Switzer
Rafael Figueiredo
Audrey Laporte
Author Affiliation
Community Dentistry Discipline, Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. herenia.lawrence@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Health Education, Dental
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of fluoride varnish (FV) (Duraflor), 5% sodium fluoride, Pharmascience Inc., Montréal, QC, Canada) and caregiver counseling in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in Aboriginal children in a 2-year community-randomized controlled trial.
Twenty First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout Zone (SLZ), Northwest Ontario, Canada were randomized to two study groups. All caregivers received oral health counseling, while children in one group received FV twice per year and the controls received no varnish. A total of 1275, 6 months to 5-year-old children from the SLZ communities were enrolled. In addition, a convenience sample of 150 primarily non-Aboriginal children of the same age were recruited from the neighboring community of Thunder Bay and used as comparisons. Longitudinal examinations for the dmft/s indices were conducted by calibrated hygienists in 2003, 2004 and 2005.
Aboriginal children living in the SLZ or in Thunder Bay had significantly higher caries prevalence and severity than non-Aboriginal children in Thunder Bay. FV treatment conferred an 18% reduction in the 2-year mean 'net' dmfs increment for Aboriginal children and a 25% reduction for all children, using cluster analysis to adjust for the intra-cluster correlation among children in the same community. Adjusted odds ratio for caries incidence was 1.96 times higher in the controls than in the FV group (95% CI = 1.08-3.56; P = 0.027). For those caries-free at baseline, the number (of children) needed to treat (NNT) equaled 7.4.
Findings support the use of FV at least twice per year, in conjunction with caregiver counseling, to prevent ECC, reduce caries increment and oral health inequalities between young Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.
PubMed ID
18422711 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2-year follow-up study of anxiety and depression in women referred for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85180
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hellsten C.
Sjöström, K.
Lindqvist P G
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. charlotte.hellsten@med.lu.se
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Colposcopy - psychology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Vaginal Smears - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine if there were any long-lasting elevated anxiety levels in women attending colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malm�?�¶ University Hospital, Sweden. POPULATION: One hundred consecutive women were invited to participate when referred for colposcopy. METHODS: Women in the study group completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale-self-rate (MADRS-S) and had a psychosocial interview prior to colposcopy at their two follow-up visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: State anxiety levels and depression scores at first visit, 6 months and 2 years. RESULTS: At follow up, levels of state anxiety and the depression scores of the women studied had decreased and were comparable to those of Swedish normative data. Two variables from the MADRS-S, 'ability to focus on different activities' and 'emotional involvement with others and in activities' were the most prominent for women with moderate to severe depression. At the 2-year visit, 30% of the women still had a fear of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Referral for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear does not seem to result in long-lasting anxiety and depression. However, a subgroup of women, with the initially highest depression scores, still had at 2-year state anxiety levels and depression scores significantly higher than normal. Almost one-third of the women still had a fear of cancer in spite of lower 2-year state anxiety levels.
PubMed ID
18081601 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3 cases of viral carriage detected during screening for HIV antibodies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226768
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
E M Shelukhina
E V Chekunova
G R Matsevich
I A Okunev
S S Marennikova
M R Zak
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Date
Mar-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Blood Donors
Carrier State - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - immunology
HIV-1 - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Lithuania - epidemiology
Mass Screening - methods
Moscow - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The results of screening more than 23,000 serum samples from persons belonging to risk groups, as well as those not belonging to such groups, in Moscow, Vilnius and Klaipeda are presented. Screening was carried out with the use of an assay system manufactured by the Scientific and Industrial Amalgamation "Antigen" (USSR). In this screening 3 HIV carriers were detected; of these, 2 were foreign students from two African countries.
PubMed ID
1872091 View in PubMed
Less detail

3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
Less detail

31906 records – page 1 of 3191.