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The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
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Advocating for equality for preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106451
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Dec 10;185(18):1559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2013
Author
Daniel Batton
Beau Batton
Source
CMAJ. 2013 Dec 10;185(18):1559-60
Date
Dec-10-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Advocacy
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pediatrics - legislation & jurisprudence
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - standards
Societies, Medical
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2014 Mar 18;186(5):37224639325
PubMed ID
24167217 View in PubMed
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[Are better prenatal care and larger maternity wards the answer to the problem of stagnating perinatal mortality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59615
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 May 25;154(22):1578-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-1992
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2001 Jul;21(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
T. Delvaux
P. Buekens
I. Godin
M. Boutsen
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Free University of Brussels, Belgium. tdelvaux@itg.be
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2001 Jul;21(1):52-9
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Europe
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Mothers - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care - standards - utilization
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Europe, it is sometimes assumed that few barriers to prenatal care exist because extensive programs of health insurance and initiatives to promote participation in prenatal care have been established for many decades. METHODS: A case-control study was performed in ten European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden). Postpartum interviews were conducted between 1995 and 1996. A total of 1283 women with inadequate prenatal care (i.e., with 0, 1, or 2 prenatal care visits or a first prenatal care visit after 15 completed weeks of pregnancy) and 1280 controls with adequate prenatal care were included in the analysis combining data from the ten countries. RESULTS: Based on combined data of the ten countries, lack of health insurance was found to be an important risk factor for inadequate prenatal care (crude odds ratio [OR] at 95% confidence interval [CI]: 30.1 [20.1-47.1]). Women with inadequate prenatal care were more likely to be aged
PubMed ID
11418258 View in PubMed
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Becoming and being a teenage mother: how teenage girls in South Western Sweden view their situation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58137
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Aug;26(7):591-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Elisabeth Hertfelt Wahn
Eva Nissen
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development, Skövde, Sweden. wahn@telia.com
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Aug;26(7):591-603
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Change Events
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Mothers - psychology
Narration
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Prenatal Care - standards
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Our aim in this study was to describe the perspectives, experiences, and reasoning about becoming and being a teenage mother by Swedish teenage girls. Twenty pregnant and parenting teenage girls, aged 15 to 19 years, were interviewed. The teenagers described a pattern of early childbirth in their families, lack of opportunity in life, and ambivalence in contraceptive use as reasons for becoming a teenage mother. They experienced being pregnant and a teenage mother as both a positive transition into adulthood but also as a physiological and psychological hardship. Furthermore, the teenagers emphasized the importance of supportive relationships with families, friends, and society as a prerequisite for successful parenting. The results of our study may be viewed as generating a working hypothesis that can be transferred to other settings on the basis of the information gathered.
PubMed ID
16126602 View in PubMed
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Beliefs and reality: detection and prevention of high alcohol consumption in Swedish antenatal clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9412
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):796-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Mona Göransson
Elisabeth Faxelid
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mona.goransson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):796-800
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
Culture
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - standards - trends
Professional Practice - standards - trends
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Substance Abuse Detection - standards - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Public antenatal care (ANC) clinics in Sweden contribute to low prenatal mortality and morbidity, through early detection of somatic risk factors, and referral to appropriate specialized care. Available statistics indicate, however, that this system is ineffective in dealing with psychosocial health problems, such as hazardous drug and alcohol use. Factors underlying this failure have not been explored. METHODS: An anonymous survey was carried out among all 207 ANC midwives in Stockholm County to establish their level of training within this problem area, clinical experience, theoretical clinical strategies, and actual clinical actions. FINDINGS: Responses indicate that ANC midwives: 1. are well aware of the health hazards of drug and alcohol use during pregnancy; 2. confirm having met and cared for subjects with hazardous substance use; 3. are familiar with specialized care resources available for this patient category; 4. make adequate choices regarding clinical action, i.e. problem identification and referral to specialized care, in hypothetical situations of encountering this patient category; 5. report consistent failure to actually exercise these choices in real clinical situations. CONCLUSIONS: A structured, clinically acceptable methodology needs to be developed in order for ANC clinics to fulfill their mission in the area of hazardous substance use in pregnant women.
PubMed ID
15315589 View in PubMed
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Birthing experience of adolescents at the Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220865
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 15;148(12):2149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1993
Author
S M Lena
E. Marko
C. Nimrod
L. Merritt
G. Poirier
E. Shein
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 15;148(12):2149-54
Date
Jun-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Hospitals, General - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ontario
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Postnatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study the experiences of prenatal care, prenatal classes and birthing among adolescents.
Anonymous self-report questionnaire survey.
Ottawa General Hospital Perinatal Centre.
A total of 100 adolescents (aged less than 20 years) and 100 control subjects (aged over 19 years) who gave birth at the Perinatal Centre from June 1989 to August 1990.
Prenatal experiences, attendance at prenatal classes, experiences in labour and delivery, postpartum care.
Only 26% of the adolescent patients sought prenatal care in the first trimester, and only 27% attended prenatal classes, as compared with 87% and 91% of the control subjects (p
Notes
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Cites: Public Health Nurs. 1991 Dec;8(4):212-81766904
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1991;17(4):399-4131746502
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 1991 Mar;12(2):77-81; discussion 82-32015245
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 1991 Mar;12(2):124-92015236
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 1990 Aug;65(8):1152-42388490
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PubMed ID
8324689 View in PubMed
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Bringing safety and responsiveness into the forefront of care for pregnant and parenting aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82144
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2006 Apr-Jun;29(2):E27-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Smith Dawn
Edwards Nancy
Varcoe Colleen
Martens Patricia J
Davies Barbara
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Canada. dsmith@uottawa.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2006 Apr-Jun;29(2):E27-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Colonialism
Communication
Communication Barriers
Community-Institutional Relations
Culture
Emotions
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nurse-Patient Relations
Parenting - ethnology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
Safety
Abstract
Poor access to prenatal care for Aboriginal people is well documented, and is explicated as an unethical barrier to care resulting from colonial and neocolonial values, attitudes, and practices. A postcolonial standpoint, participatory research principles, and a case study design were used to investigate 2 Aboriginal organizations' experiences improving care for pregnant and parenting Aboriginal people. Data were collected through exploratory interviews and small-group discussions with purposefully selected community leaders, providers, and community members. The study found that safety in healthcare relationships and settings, and responsiveness to individuals' and families' unique experiences and capacities must be brought into the forefront of care. Results suggest that the intention of care must be situated within a broader view of colonizing relations to improve early access to, and relevance of, care during pregnancy and parenting for Aboriginal people.
PubMed ID
16717484 View in PubMed
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Canada achieves lowest perinatal mortality ever.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177747
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1030
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
Suzanne Morrison
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1030
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prenatal Care - standards - trends
Quality of Health Care
Registries
Vital statistics
Notes
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2005 Jan 4;172(1):19
PubMed ID
15505256 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.