Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1020 records – page 1 of 102.

[2 health visitors' experience with pregnancy visits: pregnancy visits are a good start for cooperation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66135
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1977 Feb 9;77(6):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1977
Author
J. Nielsen
H. Kohler
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1977 Feb 9;77(6):12-4
Date
Feb-9-1977
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing
Denmark
Female
Health education
Humans
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
PubMed ID
584538 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accessing maternity care in rural Canada: there's more to the story than distance to a doctor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155499
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Sep;29(8):863-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Rebecca Sutherns
Ivy Lynn Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Sep;29(8):863-83
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods - trends
Medically underserved area
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods - trends
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Rural Health Services - standards - trends
Rural Population
Abstract
Drawing upon a comparative, qualitative study of the experiences of rural women accessing maternity care in two Canadian provinces, we demonstrate that availability of services, having economic and informational resources to access the services offered, and the appropriateness of those services in terms of gender, continuity of care, confidentiality, quality of care, and cultural fit are key to an accurate understanding of health care access. We explore the implications of living rurally on each of these dimensions, thereby revealing both gaps in and solutions to rural maternity care access that narrower, proximity-based definitions miss.
PubMed ID
18726796 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to intensive neonatal care and neonatal survival in low birthweight infants: a population study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60131
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
J F Forbes
K E Larssen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Social Paediatric and Obstetric Research Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Norway
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study evaluates the impact of regional differences in access to intensive neonatal care on neonatal survival in geographically defined populations of 4,692 low birthweight births in Norway 1979-81. For infants weighting 1,250 to 2,499 g our results are consistent with the existence of a dose-response association between neonatal survival and the level of immediate access to intensive neonatal care. Although not statistically significant, there was a clear gradient in the risk of mortality within 24 hours. A similar pattern of survival could not be consistently demonstrated for infants weighing less than 1,250 g.
PubMed ID
3506188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to web-based personalized antenatal health records for pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159321
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Jan;30(1):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Elizabeth Shaw
Michelle Howard
David Chan
Heather Waters
Janusz Kaczorowski
David Price
Joyce Zazulak
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Jan;30(1):38-43
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Internet
Medical Records
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
During pregnancy, the information needs of patients are high and effective information sharing between patients and health care providers is of particular importance. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of providing pregnant women with secure access to their antenatal health records on their uptake of, and satisfaction with, relevant information.
Women presenting to a primary care maternity centre before 28 weeks' gestation were randomized to receive access either to a secure website with links to general pregnancy health information alone (GI group) or to the same website with access to their own antenatal health record (PI group). Primary outcomes included frequency of use, and satisfaction with and perceived usefulness of the web-based information.
We approached 199 women regarding participation in the study; 193 agreed to participate, and 97 were randomized to the PI group and 96 to the GI group. The mean number of log-ins to the website in the PI group subsequently was almost six times the number of log-ins in the GI group (10.4 +/- 17.8 vs. 1.8 +/- 1.4; P
PubMed ID
18198066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental out-of-hospital births in Finland: incidence and geographical distribution 1963-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202145
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
K. Viisainen
M. Gissler
A L Hartikainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES (National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health), University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Delivery Rooms - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Hospitals - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to describe the incidence and geographical distribution of accidental out-of-hospital births (accidental births) in Finland in relation to the changes in the hospital network, and to compare the perinatal outcomes of accidental births and all hospital births.
Data for the incidence and distribution analyses of accidental births were obtained from the official statistics between 1962 and 1973 and from the national Medical Birth Registry (MBR) in 1992-1993. The infant outcomes were analyzed for the MBR data in 1991-1995.
Between 1963 and 1975 the central hospital network expanded and by 1975 they covered 72% of births. The number of small maternity units has decreased since 1963. The incidence of accidental births decreased between 1963 and 1973, from 1.3 to 0.4 per 1000 births, and rose by the 1990s to 1/1000. In the 1990s the parity adjusted risk of an accidental birth was higher for residents of northern than of southern Finland, OR 2.51 (CI 1.75-3.60), and for residents of rural compared to urban municipalities, OR 3.26 (CI 2.48-4.27). The birthweight adjusted risk for a perinatal death was higher in accidental births than in hospital births, OR 3.11 (CI 1.42-6.84).
A temporal correlation between closing of small hospitals and an increase in accidental birth rates was detected. Due to the poor infant outcomes of accidental births, centralization policies should include measures to their prevention.
PubMed ID
10326879 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:553-5, 562-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
C. Levitt
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Mar;45:553-5, 562-4
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Curriculum
Family Practice - manpower - trends
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Obstetrics - manpower - trends
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Mar;44:568-729559197
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Oct;44:2117-249805166
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 Oct 15;139(8):737-403167734
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Feb;43:239-469040911
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Sep;43:1541-79303233
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Mar;44:558-679559196
PubMed ID
10099790 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1988 Aug;23(3):359-803403275
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1989 May-Jun;5(3):157-632663051
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1989 Summer;10(4):1-1510313273
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1990 Sep-Oct;105(5):533-52120734
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1990 Winter;9(4):91-1112289763
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1987 Summer;12(2):221-353302000
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1991 May-Jun;23(3):123-81860478
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
Less detail

1020 records – page 1 of 102.