Skip header and navigation

Refine By

268 records – page 1 of 27.

Advanced maternal age and the outcomes of preterm neonates: a social paradox?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131136
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Jaideep Kanungo
Andrew James
Douglas McMillan
Abhay Lodha
Daniel Faucher
Shoo K Lee
Prakesh S Shah
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Chorioamnionitis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Steroids - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the effect of maternal age on survival free of major morbidity among preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation at birth.
Data from a retrospective cohort of preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival without major morbidity (defined as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3 or 4, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity stage 3, 4 or 5, or necrotizing enterocolitis stage 2 or 3). Trends in outcomes in relation to maternal age groups were examined using a multivariable analysis that controlled for confounders.
Baseline comparison for the 12,326 eligible newborns revealed no differences in sex, small-for-gestational-age status, and chorioamnionitis among different maternal age groups. Higher rates of cesarean delivery, use of prenatal steroids, maternal hypertension, and diabetes were noted as maternal age increased (P
PubMed ID
21934451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced Maternal Age and the Risk of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery: a Within-Family Analysis Using Finnish Population Registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287605
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Alice Goisis
Hanna Remes
Kieron Barclay
Pekka Martikainen
Mikko Myrskylä
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Certificates
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Siblings
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a major risk factor for birth outcomes. It is unclear to what extent this association is confounded by maternal characteristics. To test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birth weight (
PubMed ID
29206985 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced maternal age increases the risk of very preterm birth, irrespective of parity: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296725
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
U Waldenström
S Cnattingius
L Vixner
M Norman
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether advanced maternal age is associated with preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Population-based registry study.
Swedish Medical Birth Register.
First, second, and third live singleton births to women aged 20 years or older in Sweden, from 1990 to 2011 (n = 2 009 068).
Logistic regression analysis was used in each parity group to estimate risks of very and moderately preterm births to women at 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, and 40 years or older, using 25-29 years as the reference group. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for year of birth, education, country of birth, smoking, body mass index, and history of preterm birth. Age-related risks of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births were also investigated.
Very preterm (22-31 weeks of gestation) and moderately preterm (32-36 weeks) births.
Risks of very preterm birth increased with maternal age, irrespective of parity: adjusted ORs in first, second, and third births ranged from 1.18 to 1.28 at 30-34 years, from 1.59 to 1.70 at 35-39 years, and from 1.97 to 2.40 at =40 years. In moderately preterm births, age-related associations were weaker, but were statistically significant from 35-39 years in all parity groups. Advanced maternal age increased the risks of both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births.
Advanced maternal age is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, irrespective of parity, especially very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older, expecting their first, second, or third births, should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth.
Women aged 35 years and older should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jul;124(8):1245 PMID 28029213
PubMed ID
27770495 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse outcomes of pregnancy in women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277352
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Hannes Hagström
Jonas Höijer
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Matteo Bottai
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Hultcrantz
Olof Stephansson
Knut Stokkeland
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - complications - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common liver disease in the world, but little is known about its potential association with pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pregnancy outcomes in NAFLD.
The Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) was used to identify births between 1992 and 2011 (N = 1 960 416). By linkage with the National Patient Register, we identified women with a diagnosis of NAFLD. The MBR was then used to identify outcomes: gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, Caesarean section, Apgar score
PubMed ID
26114995 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296661
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-03-2018
Author
Anna A Usynina
Vitaly Postoev
Jon Øyvind Odland
Andrej M Grjibovski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø 9037, Norway. perinat@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Date
02-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Body Weight
Delivery, Obstetric
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive Tract Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012-2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (
PubMed ID
29401677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse pregnancy outcomes related to advanced maternal age compared with smoking and being overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105162
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ulla Waldenström
Vigdis Aasheim
Anne Britt Vika Nilsen
Svein Rasmussen
Hans Järnbert Pettersson
Erica Schytt
Erica Shytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health Care, and the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset (KI SÖS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, and the Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; and the Center for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bergen University College, and the Department of Clinical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):104-12
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between advanced maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes and to compare the risks related to advanced maternal age with those related to smoking and being overweight or obese.
A population-based register study including all nulliparous women aged 25 years and older with singleton pregnancies at 22 weeks of gestation or greater who gave birth in Sweden and Norway from 1990 to 2010; 955,804 women were analyzed. In each national sample, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of very preterm birth, moderately preterm birth, small for gestational age, low Apgar score, fetal death, and neonatal death in women aged 30-34 years (n=319,057), 35-39 years (n=94,789), and 40 years or older (n=15,413) were compared with those of women aged 25-29 years (n=526,545). In the Swedish sample, the number of additional cases of each outcome associated with maternal age 30 years or older, smoking, and overweight or obesity, respectively, was estimated in relation to a low-risk group of nonsmokers of normal weight and aged 25-29 years.
The adjusted OR of all outcomes increased by maternal age in a similar way in Sweden and Norway; and the risk of fetal death was increased even in the 30- to 34-year-old age group (Sweden n=826, adjusted OR 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.37; Norway n=472, adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.12-1.41). Maternal age 30 years or older was associated with the same number of additional cases of fetal deaths (n=251) as overweight or obesity (n=251).
For the individual woman, the absolute risk for each of the outcomes was small, but for society, it may be significant as a result of the large number of women who give birth after the age of 30 years.
II.
Notes
Erratum In: Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Mar;123(3):669Shytt, Erica [corrected to Schytt, Erica]
PubMed ID
24463670 View in PubMed
Less detail

Algorithms to estimate the beginning of pregnancy in administrative databases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124762
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jan;22(1):16-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Andrea V Margulis
Soko Setoguchi
Murray A Mittleman
Robert J Glynn
Colin R Dormuth
Sonia Hernández-Díaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. andreamargulis@post.harvard.edu
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Jan;22(1):16-24
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
British Columbia
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The role of administrative databases for research on drug safety during pregnancy can be limited by their inaccurate assessment of the timing of exposure, as the gestational age at birth is typically unavailable. Therefore, we sought to develop and validate algorithms to estimate the gestational age at birth using information available in these databases.
Using a population-based cohort of 286,432 mother-child pairs in British Columbia (1998-2007), we validated an ICD-9/10-based preterm-status indicator and developed algorithms to estimate the gestational age at birth on the basis of this indicator, maternal age, singleton/multiple status, and claims for routine prenatal care tests. We assessed the accuracy of the algorithm-based estimates relative to the gold standard of the clinical gestational age at birth recorded in the delivery discharge record.
The preterm-status indicator had specificity and sensitivity of 98% and 91%, respectively. Estimates from an algorithm that assigned 35?weeks of gestational age at birth to deliveries with the preterm-status indicator and 39?weeks to those without them were within 2?weeks of the clinical gestational age at birth in 75% of preterm and 99% of term deliveries.
Subtracting 35?weeks (245?days) from the date of birth in deliveries with codes for preterm birth and 39?weeks (273?days) in those without them provided the optimal estimate of the beginning of pregnancy among the algorithms studied.
Notes
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2005 Nov;27(11):1048-6216529673
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jun 8;354(23):2443-5116760444
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Aug;63(8):898-90616894066
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Aug;15(8):546-5416586470
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Aug;15(8):555-6416767799
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Feb;29(2):146-7917346485
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 May;16(5):474-8416897811
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Jun;196(6):544.e1-517547888
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Oct;16(10):1075-8517729379
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Nov;16(11):1181-317966108
Cites: Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2008 Feb;83(1):68-7618293409
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Mar 15;167(6):633-4018194999
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:7918402681
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2008 May;192(5):338-4318450656
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2008;8:2518627638
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2009 Mar;18(3):246-5219148882
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Jul;124(1):234-4019564305
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Jun;115(6):1201-820502291
Cites: Arch Neurol. 2005 Sep;62(9):1362-516157743
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2005 Dec;14(12):829-3615800957
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jul 15;154(2):180-711447053
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Sep;98(3):525-3811547793
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Aug-Sep;10(5):393-711802583
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Nov;24(11):894-91212417905
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2004 Mar;31(1):35-5015062446
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(3):197-2072220340
PubMed ID
22550030 View in PubMed
Less detail

All Our Babies Cohort Study: recruitment of a cohort to predict women at risk of preterm birth through the examination of gene expression profiles and the environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138214
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010;10:87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sara K Gracie
Andrew W Lyon
Heather L Kehler
Craig E Pennell
Siobhan M Dolan
Deborah A McNeil
Jodi E Siever
Sheila W McDonald
Alan D Bocking
Stephen J Lye
Kathy M Hegadoren
David M Olson
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2010;10:87
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Clinical Protocols
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Forecasting - methods
Gene Expression Profiling
Humans
Premature Birth - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Research Design
Risk factors
Abstract
Preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for preterm birth include a personal or familial history of preterm delivery, ethnicity and low socioeconomic status yet the ability to predict preterm delivery before the onset of preterm labour evades clinical practice. Evidence suggests that genetics may play a role in the multi-factorial pathophysiology of preterm birth. The All Our Babies Study is an on-going community based longitudinal cohort study that was designed to establish a cohort of women to investigate how a women's genetics and environment contribute to the pathophysiology of preterm birth. Specifically this study will examine the predictive potential of maternal leukocytes for predicting preterm birth in non-labouring women through the examination of gene expression profiles and gene-environment interactions.
Collaborations have been established between clinical lab services, the provincial health service provider and researchers to create an interdisciplinary study design for the All Our Babies Study. A birth cohort of 2000 women has been established to address this research question. Women provide informed consent for blood sample collection, linkage to medical records and complete questionnaires related to prenatal health, service utilization, social support, emotional and physical health, demographics, and breast and infant feeding. Maternal blood samples are collected in PAXgene™ RNA tubes between 18-22 and 28-32 weeks gestation for transcriptomic analyses.
The All Our Babies Study is an example of how investment in clinical-academic-community partnerships can improve research efficiency and accelerate the recruitment and data collection phases of a study. Establishing these partnerships during the study design phase and maintaining these relationships through the duration of the study provides the unique opportunity to investigate the multi-causal factors of preterm birth. The overall All Our Babies Study results can potentially lead to healthier pregnancies, mothers, infants and children.
Notes
Cites: Biostatistics. 2005 Jan;6(1):27-3815618525
Cites: Public Health Genomics. 2010;13(7-8):514-2320484876
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Apr;192(4):1023-715846175
Cites: Epidemiology. 2005 Jul;16(4):469-7715951664
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Sep;193(3 Pt 2):1170-416157132
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 2006 Feb;30(1):8-1516549207
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Jun;194(6):1616-2416731080
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Nov;195(5):1240-817074545
Cites: BJOG. 2006 Dec;113 Suppl 3:17-4217206962
Cites: BJOG. 2006 Dec;113 Suppl 3:60-717206967
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Feb;196(2):107-1817306646
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:14817617914
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug 15;154(4):307-1511495853
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;15 Suppl 2:104-2311520404
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Sep;185(3):643-5111568793
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Aug 10;325(7359):30112169504
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Nov;100(5 Pt 1):1020-3712423870
Cites: BJOG. 2003 Apr;110 Suppl 20:8-1612763105
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jun;190(6):1504-8; discussion 3A15284722
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1983 Dec;24(4):385-966668417
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jan 10;312(2):82-903880598
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1987 Jun;150:782-63651732
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1989 Jan;73(1):31-42642326
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1989 Feb;83(2):430-62913048
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1989 Apr;160(4):863-8; discussion 868-702712118
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1991;32(6):705-142035047
Cites: Clin Nurs Res. 1992 Nov;1(4):336-461483137
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Dec;48(12):1495-5018543963
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1995 Dec;48(12):1503-108543964
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Nov;175(5):1286-928942502
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;49(12):1373-98970487
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Oct;177(4):810-39369824
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jul 30;339(5):313-209682045
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Jan;180(1 Pt 3):S257-639914629
Cites: Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 1999 Jun;57(4):243-5710402218
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2004 Nov 8;5:8715533245
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jan 5;371(9606):75-8418177778
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jan 12;371(9607):164-7518191687
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Apr;198(4):468.e1-7; discussion 468.e7-918395044
Cites: Hum Genet. 2008 Oct;124(3):243-5318807256
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Oct;199(4):367.e1-818928976
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Feb 11;362(6):529-3520147718
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Sep;126(3):443-5620732945
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Mar;58(3):304-1015718120
PubMed ID
21192811 View in PubMed
Less detail

An association of chorionicity with preterm twin birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179694
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Debora Penava
Renato Natale
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Western Ontario, London ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Chorion - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To assess the risk factors for preterm birth in twin pregnancies, particularly monochorionicity.
A cohort study of 767 sets of twins, each twin weighing more than 500 g, born between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001, at St. Joseph's Health Care in London, Ontario. Statistical analysis was performed using forward stepwise logistic regression models, with gestational age at birth less than 28 or 32 weeks as the outcome.
Polyhydramnios and chorioamnionitis were significant risk factors for preterm birth prior to 28 or 32 weeks' gestation. Monochorionicity was a risk factor for preterm birth prior to 32 weeks' gestation. Past term birth and maternal age over 30 years were associated with reduced risk for preterm birth.
Monochorionic placentation is a significant risk factor for preterm twin birth.
PubMed ID
15193202 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antenatal steroid therapy for fetal lung maturation: is there an association with childhood asthma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152796
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Feb;46(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Jason D Pole
Cameron A Mustard
Teresa To
Joseph Beyene
Alexander C Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. j.pole@utoronto.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Feb;46(1):47-52
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Fetal Organ Maturity - drug effects
Gestational Age
Humans
Hyaline Membrane Disease - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that fetal exposure to corticosteroids in the antenatal period is an independent risk factor for the development of asthma in childhood.
A population-based cohort study was conducted of all pregnant women who resided in Nova Scotia, Canada, and gave birth to a singleton fetus between January 1989 and December 1998 and lived to discharge. After exclusions, 79,395 infants were available for analysis. Using linked health care utilization records, incident asthma cases between 36 to 72 months of age were identified. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to estimate the odds ratio of the association between exposure to corticosteroids and asthma while controlling for confounders.
Over the 10 years of the study corticosteroid therapy increased by threefold. Exposure to corticosteroids during pregnancy was associated with a risk of asthma in childhood: adjusted odds ratio of 1.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.44).
Antenatal steroid therapy appears to be an independent risk factor for the development of asthma between 36 and 72 months of age. Further research into the smallest possible steroid dose required to achieve the desired post-natal effect is needed to reduce the risk of developing childhood asthma.
PubMed ID
19191137 View in PubMed
Less detail

268 records – page 1 of 27.