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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Perceived discrimination, group identification, and life satisfaction among multiracial people: a test of the rejection-identification model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119851
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2012 Oct;18(4):319-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Lisa S Giamo
Michael T Schmitt
H Robert Outten
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. lgiamo@sfu.ca
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2012 Oct;18(4):319-28
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Prejudice - ethnology
Questionnaires
Rejection (Psychology)
Self Concept
Social Discrimination - ethnology
Social Identification
Social Perception
Stereotyping
Stress, Psychological - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Like other racial minority groups, multiracial people face discrimination as a function of their racial identity, and this discrimination represents a threat to psychological well-being. Following the Rejection-Identification Model (RIM; Branscombe, Schmitt, & Harvey, 1999), we argue that perceived discrimination will encourage multiracial people to identify more strongly with other multiracials, and that multiracial identification, in turn, fosters psychological well-being. Thus, multiracial identification is conceptualized as a coping response that reduces the overall costs of discrimination on well-being. This study is the first to test the RIM in a sample of multiracial people. Multiracial participants' perceptions of discrimination were negatively related to life satisfaction. Consistent with the RIM, perceived discrimination was positively related to three aspects of multiracial group identification: stereotyping the self as similar to other multiracial people, perceiving people within the multiracial category as more homogenous, and expressing solidarity with the multiracial category. Self-stereotyping was the only aspect of group identification that mediated a positive relationship between perceived discrimination and life satisfaction, suggesting that multiracial identification's protective properties rest in the fact that it provides an collective identity where one "fits."
PubMed ID
23066642 View in PubMed
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Ramifications of positive and negative contact experiences among remigrants from Russia to Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279671
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016 Apr;22(2):247-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Tuuli Anna Mähönen
Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2016 Apr;22(2):247-55
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Humans
Longitudinal Ligaments
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology - psychology
Russia - ethnology
Social Identification
Abstract
This article focuses on the effects of positive and negative contact with majority Finns on the outgroup attitudes of remigrants from Russia to Finland. We tested (a) whether negative contact leads to negative outgroup attitudes via perceived threats, and (b) whether positive contact leads to positive outgroup attitudes via perceived gains seen to result from contact with majority Finns. We also tested whether the effects of contact with majority members generalized to attitudes toward other immigrant groups living in Finland.
The study used 2-wave longitudinal panel data on Ingrian-Finnish remigrants (NT1 = 133, mean age 46.4 years, 73% females; NT2 = 85, mean age 49.3 years, 73% females).
The results attested the effects of positive contact experiences on attitudes toward both majority and other minority group members, via perceived gains. As regards negative contact, it was associated with more negative attitudes toward the majority via perceived threats, but no evidence of secondary transfer effect on attitudes toward other immigrants was found.
The results highlight the importance of simultaneous examination of positive and negative contact. Especially positive contact and gains perceived to result from it can be powerful tools in promoting positive outgroup attitudes also among minority group members. The results also show the role of majority group members in defining interminority attitudes.
PubMed ID
26168164 View in PubMed
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