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808 records – page 1 of 81.

[1986 SHSTF Congress. Unequal sex distribution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52927
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Author
D. Snäckerström
M. Lindberg
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):20
Date
Nov-27-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Male
Prejudice
Societies
Sweden
PubMed ID
3649140 View in PubMed
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[Abolish the humiliating age limit of 65!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195893
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 6;97(49):5828
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-6-2000
Author
B. Blomquist
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 6;97(49):5828
Date
Dec-6-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Employment
Health Policy
Humans
Physicians
Prejudice
Private Sector
Public Sector
Sweden
PubMed ID
11188049 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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Absence of bias against smokers in access to coronary revascularization after cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176495
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Jacques Cornuz
Peter D Faris
P Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Catheterization - utilization
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Prejudice
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Many consider smoking to be a personal choice for which individuals should be held accountable. We assessed whether there is any evidence of bias against smokers in cardiac care decision-making by determining whether smokers were as likely as non-smokers to undergo revascularization procedures after cardiac catheterization.
Prospective cohort study. Subjects and setting. All patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada.
Patients were categorized as current smokers, former smokers, or never smokers, and then compared for their risk-adjusted likelihood of undergoing revascularization procedures (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting) after cardiac catheterization.
Among 20406 patients undergoing catheterization, 25.4% were current smokers at the time of catheterization, 36.6% were former smokers, and 38.0% had never smoked. When compared with never smokers (reference group), the hazard ratio for undergoing any revascularization procedure after catheterization was 0.98 (95% CI 0.93-1.03) for current smokers and 0.98 (0.94-1.03) for former smokers. The hazard ratio for undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting was 1.09 (1.00-1.19) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.93-1.08) for former smokers. For percutaneous coronary intervention, the hazard ratios were 0.93 (0.87-0.99) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.94-1.06) for former smokers.
Despite potential for discrimination on the basis of smoking status, current and former smokers undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada were as likely to undergo revascularization procedures as catheterization patients who had never smoked.
PubMed ID
15668309 View in PubMed
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Abuse of residents: it's time to take action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211834
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1996
Author
M F Myers
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1705-8
Date
Jun-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Women - psychology
Prejudice
Sex Factors
Sexual Harassment
Abstract
The scientific study of the sexual dynamics that come into play during residency training seems to both fascinate and repel trainees and their supervisors. One of the more provocative and shameful dimensions of this area of inquiry, the abuse of residents, causes a good deal of distress. How do we respond to findings of significant psychological abuse, discrimination on the basis of sex or sexual orientation and sexual harassment in medical settings? How can we ignore over a decade of research? How can we not heed the experience of so many young physicians? Given the uncertain times in Canadian medicine and the insecurity in our professional and personal lives, we must work together to improve the culture of our teaching institutions and implement measures nationally and locally to close this dark chapter.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Feb 10;251(6):739-426694276
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1056-77897792
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 17;273(19):15537739086
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Feb 7;275(5):414-68569024
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Apr 5;273(13):1022-57897785
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1987 Sep;28(9):462-83432549
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Jan 26;263(4):527-322294324
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Jan;151(1):10-78267106
Comment On: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 1;154(11):1657-658646653
PubMed ID
8646658 View in PubMed
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Accepting the gay person: rental accommodation in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204598
Source
J Homosex. 1998;36(2):31-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Page
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Ontario.
Source
J Homosex. 1998;36(2):31-9
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Homosexuality
Housing
Humans
Male
Prejudice
United States
Abstract
Effects of the "homosexual" label in obtaining community accommodation were examined, in a sample of 180 individuals advertising rooms or flats for rent in two Canadian cities, Windsor and London, Ontario, and in Detroit, Michigan. Telephone calls, for half the sample, made simple enquiries as to availability; for the other half, similar enquiries were made by an individual who was ostensibly homosexual. In the latter condition, rooms were significantly more likely to be described as unavailable. Comparisons are made to similar, previous research, and to current perspectives about community reactions to stigmatizing conditions.
PubMed ID
9736330 View in PubMed
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Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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808 records – page 1 of 81.