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240 records – page 1 of 24.

[Abortion among young women--the importance of family environment factors and social class]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81738
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2006
Author
Pedersen Willy
Samuelsen Sven Ove
Eskild Anne
Author Affiliation
Institutt for sosiologi og samfunnsgeografi, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1096 Blindern, 0317 Oslo. villy.pedersen@sosiologi.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):1734-7
Date
Jun-22-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Questionnaires
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate possible associations between social background, other aspects of childhood environment and induced abortion among young women. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Norwegian girls (N = 2,198), comprising a representative sample, were followed up through three data collections from they were in their teens in 1992 till they were young adult women (20 - 27 years) seven years later. A questionnaire was used to collect the data and the analyses were conducted by Cox regression. The response rate for the first data collection was 97%. The cumulative response rate over all three data collections was 69 %. RESULTS: In young adulthood we uncovered a steady reduction of induced abortion rates with increasing educational level. Women who had grown up in Northern Norway had higher rates than other women. There was a lower risk for induced abortion when parents were well educated and had fairly good jobs. Further, there were associations to parental divorce, weak parental monitoring and parental alcohol abuse. INTERPRETATION: A host of socioeconomic factors are associated with abortion risk. We need more thorough knowledge about these factors. We can, however, conclude that preventive efforts in this area should be targeted towards groups with risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jun 22;126(13):172716794660
PubMed ID
16794665 View in PubMed
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[Abortion rate among students are increasing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170849
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Elise Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Tampereen yliopiston lääketieteen laitos. elise.kosunen@uta.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Contraception - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Notes
Comment In: Duodecim. 2006;122(1):104; author reply 10416509197
PubMed ID
16457103 View in PubMed
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[Adolescent health centers--network with a holistic view of adolescence problems]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63100
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 1-7;103(5):289-92
Publication Type
Article

Adolescent marriage and childbearing: the long-term economic outcome, Canada in the 1980s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233693
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C F Grindstaff
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Economics
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Humans
Income
Marriage
Maternal Age
Occupations
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-term economic outcomes (education, labor force participation, occupation, and income) associated with female adolescent marriage and childbearing. The 1981 Canadian census is the data source for all women in Canada at age 30, controlling for age at marriage and at first birth. The data suggest that women at age 30 in Canada are in the best economic circumstances when they remain single or when they marry at age 20 or older and either remain childless or begin their childbearing at age 25 or older. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
3381686 View in PubMed
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Adolescent mothers: A challenge for First Nations

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4446
Source
Pages 274-279 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
adolescents and din1inishing the risk of pregnancy in adolescent girls ( 11) YVithin the framework of this article, it is not possible to address the issue of delay of first preg- nancy, but I will attempt to touch upon a model for delay of second pregnancy through heighten- ing of self-esteem. I believe
  1 document  
Author
Montgomery-Andersen, R
Author Affiliation
Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 274-279 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
First Nations
Greenland
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mentors
Middle Aged
Mothers
Parenting
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Adolescent pregnancy is a growing Public Health problem in Greenland, resulting in higher risk of mortality of mothers and their children. Since social and cultural aspects are associated with adolescent pregnancy, a closer look was taken at the situation of adolescent mothers in Greenland and in Native American communities. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adolescent pregnancies and birth rates were followed in Greenland and in the First Nation communities in Alaska. Adolescent pregnancies decreased during the 1990s in both communities, but increased in 2000, bringing up the birth rate to 79 and 92 babies per 1,000 girls aged 15-19 yrs in Greenland in the U.S., respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A mentoring program to delay adolescent pregnancy and parenting, shown to be effective in African American and Latino communities, could be also used in the Greenlandic setting.
PubMed ID
15736667 View in PubMed
Documents
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Sep 1;129(5):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1983

Adolescent nutrition: 5. Pregnancy and diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241546
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):691-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1983
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 1;129(7):691-2
Date
Oct-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Diet
Female
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Prenatal Care
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1972 Sep;25(9):916-255054218
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1972 Dec;40(6):773-854564722
Cites: J Nutr. 1973 May;103(5):772-854710089
Cites: Pediatrics. 1983 Apr;71(4):489-936835732
Cites: Clin Perinatol. 1975 Sep;2(2):243-541102222
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Aug 17;299(7):317-23683264
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Sep 15;125(6):567-767284936
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1975 Jun;66(6):588-921097488
PubMed ID
6616377 View in PubMed
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The adolescent parenting program: improving outcomes through mentorship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201680
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Jun;16(3):182-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
L. Flynn
Author Affiliation
Essex Valley Visiting Nurse Association, East Orange, New Jersey 07018, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1999 Jun;16(3):182-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Community Health Nursing
Female
Humans
Mentors
New Jersey
Parenting - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Adolescent parents and their infants are a population at risk. Infant mortality, low-birthweight, and child maltreatment are inordinately higher within this population than within slightly older cohorts. The purpose of this one group pretest-posttest intervention study was to analyze the efficacy of a program designed to improve infant outcomes through the enhancement of health practices and parenting skills in a sample of 137 low-income, pregnant and parenting adolescents who reside in an urban area and who screened positive for risk of child maltreatment. Based on theories of mentorship and social support, the program provided intensive home visitation by nursing paraprofessionals, indigenous to the community, for the 2 year study period. Program outcomes were compared to local and national data. Findings revealed only 4.6% of program infants were low-birthweight compared to local and national percentages of 13.5% and 9.42%. The mean length of gestation was 39.27 weeks (SD = 1.55). The incidence of infant mortality was zero, comparing favorably with national data as well as the local infant mortality rate (almost twice the state average). There were only four cases of child neglect, representing only 2.91% of the sample. This finding also compares favorably with national data.
PubMed ID
10388335 View in PubMed
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240 records – page 1 of 24.