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37 records – page 1 of 4.

[So called diabetes in pregnancy--a new public disease?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48169
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 30;117(14):2074-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1997
Author
J. Bollerslev
J. Jervell
K. Hanssen
P E Børdahl
T. Henriksen
N. Moe
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 30;117(14):2074-5
Date
May-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9235694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Outcome of pregnancy in diabetic women. More investigation is needed into whether control of diabetes is really poorer in England than Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47739
Source
BMJ. 2001 Mar 10;322(7286):614-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2001
Author
J. Golding
Source
BMJ. 2001 Mar 10;322(7286):614-5
Date
Mar-10-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Prevalence
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 2000 Sep 23;321(7263):730-110999902
PubMed ID
11269258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Results of 312 pregnancies among white class B-F mothers in northern Jutland from 1976 to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48486
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Feb;41(1):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
G L Nielsen
P H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Aalbborg Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Feb;41(1):115-8
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of all pregnancies among White class B-F mothers in the county of Northern Jutland from 1976 to 1992. DESIGN: Retrospective, hospital record based study. SETTING: Eleven hospitals, of which the Department of Obstetrics in Aalborg has been appointed regional centre for care of all diabetic pregnancies in the county, covering approximately 550,000 inhabitants. PATIENTS: 312 consecutive, unselected planned pregnancies among 223 women with White class B-F diabetes mellitus delivering in the county of Northern Jutland from 1976 to 1992. MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-two (10.2%) pregnancies terminated with spontaneous abortions and ten (3.2%) abortions were induced for medical reasons. There were eleven (4.0%) perinatal deaths of which one had lethal malformations. Ten (3.6%) babies had major malformations. HbA1c values varied from 7.4% (n = 171) in the first to 6.6% (n = 216) in the third trimester. CONCLUSION: The perinatal mortality is in the upper range of contemporary published series with late intrauterine stillbirths as the main problem. To improve detection of fetal distress in late pregnancy, our observational program has been intensified.
PubMed ID
8187562 View in PubMed
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St Vincent's Declaration 10 years on: outcome of diabetic pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63578
Source
Diabet Med. 2003 Jan;20(1):82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
J M Steel
Source
Diabet Med. 2003 Jan;20(1):82
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Notes
Comment On: Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):216-2011918624
PubMed ID
12519328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diabetes in Montana's Indians: the epidemiology of diabetes in the Indians of the Northern Plains and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180200
Source
Curr Diab Rep. 2004 Jun;4(3):224-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Dorothy Gohdes
Carrie S Oser
Todd S Harwell
Kelly R Moore
Janet M McDowall
Steven D Helgerson
Author Affiliation
Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Cogswell Building, C-317, PO Box 202951, Helena, MT 59620-2951, USA.
Source
Curr Diab Rep. 2004 Jun;4(3):224-9
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Montana - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
The prevalence of diabetes is two- to threefold higher in American Indians in Montana compared with the non-Indian population. High rates of diabetes have also been described in Canadian aboriginal populations closely related to the tribes in Montana. Diabetes in pregnancy has increased among Indian mothers and high-birth-weight babies are increasingly likely to be born to Indian mothers with diabetes in pregnancy. Over 70% of the incident cases of diabetes in youth less than 20 years of age on the reservations have the clinical characteristics of type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular disease mortality rates are high among Indians in Montana, and the prevalence of smoking in the Indian populations of Montana and the neighboring tribes in Canada is remarkably high. Indians in Montana are more likely than non-Indians of similar age to believe that diabetes is preventable and to recall advice about diabetes risk.
PubMed ID
15132890 View in PubMed
Less detail

Twinning rates according to maternal birthweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147114
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2009 Dec;12(6):591-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ellen A Nohr
Steen Rasmussen
C H Ramlau-Hansen
Jorn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Denmark. ean@soci.au.dk
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2009 Dec;12(6):591-7
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth rate
Body Weight
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Twins
Abstract
Dizygotic twinning rates have changed over time, which has been seen as a sign of a decline in fecundity. Since a woman's birthweight has been shown to be a marker of her fecundity, maternal birthweight may correlate with subsequent twinning rates. In the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002), we examined if maternal birthweight, and whether she was born at term or preterm, correlated with her probability of multiple birth. For 20,719 live born infants, we had self-reported information about maternal birthweight, collected during the first wave of the 7-year follow-up, and information on multiple births from record linkage. The association between maternal birthweight and multiple births was investigated by use of logistic regression and presented as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared to women born at term with a birthweight of 3001-4000 g, women with a birthweight > 4500 g appeared to have higher chance of multiple birth while women with a birthweight of 4001-4500 had a lower chance, especially if the analysis was restricted to women with a BMI or= 25, no obvious pattern was present. Our findings do not indicate that twinning is a fecundity indicator. Women with a birthweight that may indicate a pregnancy complicated with gestational diabetes had the highest rate of multiple birth. These findings are new and should be put to a critical test in other data sources.
PubMed ID
19943722 View in PubMed
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A survey to trace previously unknown diabetes mellitus. Results from part of the health survey in the county of Värmland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49102
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1967 Feb;181(2):129-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1967

Pregnancy outcomes in diabetes subtypes: how do they compare? A province-based study of Ontario, 2005-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149372
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Jun;31(6):487-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Patricia Peticca
Erin J Keely
Mark C Walker
Qiuying Yang
Jim Bottomley
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Jun;31(6):487-96
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To ascertain differences in pregnancy outcomes between women with diabetes subtypes (type 1 [DM1], type 2 [DM2], women with gestational [GDM])] and non-diabetic women within a large Canadian population.
We performed a retrospective multi-cohort analysis of all obstetrical deliveries that occurred in the province of Ontario between April 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006. Data were extracted from the Ontario Niday Perinatal Database.
Increased rates of major negative maternal and perinatal outcomes (i.e. preterm delivery, Caesarean section, pregnancy-induced hypertension/preeclampsia) occurred in women with DM1. Both DM1 and GDM subtypes were associated with the greatest risk of macrosomia, shoulder dystocia, and congenital anomalies. DM2 did not demonstrate an association with an increased risk of congenital malformations and stillbirth.
Diabetes in pregnancy, irrespective of subtype, predisposes women to poorer outcomes than those of the general obstetric population. However, this large population analysis is consistent with previous studies in showing that the adversity remains greatest for women with type 1 diabetes.
PubMed ID
19646313 View in PubMed
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The associations of maternal body mass index with birthweight and placental weight. Does maternal diabetes matter? A population study of 106 191 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280622
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Oct;95(10):1162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Ellen M Strøm-Roum
Tom G Tanbo
Anne Eskild
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Oct;95(10):1162-70
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Body mass index
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Organ Size
Placenta - anatomy & histology
Placentation
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to study whether the associations of maternal body mass index with offspring birthweight and placental weight differ by maternal diabetes status.
We performed a population study of 106 191 singleton pregnancies by using data from the years 2009-2012 in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We estimated changes in birthweight and in placental weight (in grams) by maternal body mass index by linear regression analysis.
In pregnancies of women without diabetes, birthweight increased by 14.7 g (95% confidence interval 14.1-15.2) per unit increase in maternal body mass index, and the increase in placental weight was 4.2 g (95% confidence interval 4.0-4.4). In pregnancies of women with gestational diabetes, the corresponding figures were 11.8 g (95% confidence interval 8.3-15.4) and 2.9 g (95% confidence interval 1.7-4.0). In pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes we found no significant changes in birthweight or in placental weight by maternal body mass index. Overall, mean birthweight was 513.9 g (95% confidence interval 475.6-552.1) higher in pregnancies involving type 1 diabetes than in pregnancies of women without diabetes. Mean placental weight was 102.1 g (95% confidence interval 89.3-114.9) higher. Also, in pregnancies of women with gestational diabetes, both birthweight and placental weight were higher than in women without diabetes (168.2 g and 46.5 g, respectively). Adjustments were made for maternal body mass index and gestational age at birth.
Birthweight and placental weight increased with increasing maternal body mass index in pregnancies of women without diabetes and in pregnancies of women with gestational diabetes, but not in pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes. Independent of body mass index, mean birthweight and mean placental weight were highest in pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes.
PubMed ID
27454190 View in PubMed
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Outcome of pregnancy in diabetic women in northeast England and in Norway, 1994-7.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58716
Source
BMJ. 2000 Sep 23;321(7263):730-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2000
Author
G. Hawthorne
L M Irgens
R T Lie
Author Affiliation
Northern Diabetic Pregnancy Survey, Regional Maternity Survey Office, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4AA. gillian.hawthorne@nth.northynhs.uk
Source
BMJ. 2000 Sep 23;321(7263):730-1
Date
Sep-23-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Comparative Study
England - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2001 Mar 10;322(7286):614-511269258
Comment In: BMJ. 2001 Mar 10;322(7286):614; author reply 61511269257
Comment In: BMJ. 2003 Oct 18;327(7420):883-414563721
Comment In: BMJ. 2003 Oct 18;327(7420):92914563763
Retraction In: BMJ. 2003 Oct 18;327(7420):90514596229
PubMed ID
10999902 View in PubMed
Less detail

37 records – page 1 of 4.