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Abnormal bleeding associated with preeclampsia: a population study of 315,085 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90728
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eskild Anne
Vatten Lars J
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Uterine Hemorrhage - complications
Abstract
ObjeCTIVE: To study the association of preeclampsia with abnormal bleeding in the first trimester and after delivery. DESIGN: Register-based population study. Setting. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Population. A total of 315,085 women in Norway with singleton deliveries after 21 weeks of gestation (1999-2004). METHODS: We compared frequencies of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester between women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and women without preeclampsia development, and made similar comparisons for postpartum bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women with bleeding. RESULTS: In the first trimester, vaginal bleeding occurred in 1.6% (215/13,166) of subsequent preeclampsia cases, compared to 2.0% (6,112/301,919) of normotensives (p1,500 mL) occurred in 3.0% (399/13,166) of preeclampsia cases and in 1.4% (4,223/301,919) of normotensives (p500 mL) was also more common in preeclampsia cases (22.9% versus 13.9%, p
PubMed ID
19093234 View in PubMed
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Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol: a comparison of various protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209155
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
E R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Colubmia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced - methods - statistics & numerical data
Administration, Intravaginal
Administration, Oral
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Seven hundred fifty-six women had abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol. Various protocols were compared. In Group 1, phase 1, after receiving 50 mg/m2 methotrexate IM, 289 women were randomized to receive either 750 or 500 micrograms of vaginal misoprostol. In Group 1, phase 2, 84 women who had failed to abort after one dose of misoprostol were randomized to receive either vaginal or oral routes for the second dose of misoprostol given on Day 8. In Group 2, a cohort of 226 women who received 60 mg/m2 methotrexate were compared to the 289 women who received 50 mg/m2 in Group 1. There were no differences in rates of effectiveness in the various trial groups. Side effects were greater with 60 mg/m2 of methotrexate. In Group 3, a cohort of 241 women received the misoprostol in three vaginal doses 8 hr apart starting on Day 5, and were compared to the 289 women in Group 1 receiving one vaginal dose. In women whose medical abortion failed, fetuses were found to have limb abnormalities In the total group of 756 women, 88.8% aborted successfully without surgical aspiration, with only minor side effects, and the acceptance rate was high. This study indicates that medical abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol are safe and effective, but more research is needed to find a more effective protocol.
PubMed ID
9115004 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper in maternal blood and developmental placental tissue: differences between Finland, Estonia, and St. Petersburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198281
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Kantola
R. Purkunen
P. Kröger
A. Tooming
J. Juravskaja
M. Pasanen
S. Saarikoski
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Finland. marjatta.kantola@uku.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
7-Alkoxycoumarin O-Dealkylase - metabolism
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cadmium - analysis - blood
Copper - analysis - blood
Drug Interactions
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Placenta - chemistry - enzymology
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Regression Analysis
Russia
Smoking - blood - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - blood
Abstract
Cadmium, zinc, and copper from placental tissue and blood samples at the first trimester (n = 64) and at term (n = 152) were analyzed; the welfare of newborns and placental 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities in vitro were determined. The study material was collected from Finland, Estonia, and Russia. The results demonstrate that Cd starts to accumulate in the placenta during the first trimester and that Zn and Cu contents were significantly higher at the first trimester than at term. Among nonsmokers a negative correlation was found between placental Cu content and birth weight of neonates. Among smokers a positive correlation between placental Zn content and birth weight and ECOD activity was found. The birth weights correlated inversely with the length of time the mothers smoked. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in the samples collected from St. Petersburg. The data demonstrate an inverse accumulation of Zn and Cd throughout the pregnancy in the placenta and maternal blood samples. Zn may act as a positive marker or even an enzymatic enhancement for the human placental vital functions. Smoking, parity, age, and especially the place of residence affect the Cd, Zn, and Cu contents and ratios in placenta and mother's blood.
PubMed ID
10845782 View in PubMed
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Acetaminophen use during pregnancy: effects on risk for congenital abnormalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87582
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Feb;198(2):178.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Rebordosa Cristina
Kogevinas Manolis
Horváth-Puhó Erzsébet
Nørgård Bente
Morales Maria
Czeizel Andrew E
Vilstrup Hendrik
Sørensen Henrik T
Olsen Jørn
Author Affiliation
Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. crebordosa@imim.es
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Feb;198(2):178.e1-7
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Acetaminophen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated if acetaminophen, one of the most frequently used drugs among pregnant women is associated with an increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We selected 88,142 pregnant women and their liveborn singletons from the Danish National Birth Cohort who had information on acetaminophen use during the first trimester of pregnancy. We used the National Hospital Registry to identify 3784 (4.3%) children from the cohort diagnosed with 5847 congenital abnormalities. RESULTS: Children exposed to acetaminophen during the first trimester of pregnancy (n = 26,424) did not have an increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities (hazard ratio = 1.01, 0.93-1.08) compared with nonexposed children (n = 61,718). No association was found between congenital abnormalities and duration of use during the first trimester. Increased prevalence was not observed for specific abnormalities, except for "medial cysts, fistula, sinus" (congenital abnormalities of the ear, face, and neck, ICD-10 code Q18.8, n = 43) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.15 (1.17-3.95). CONCLUSION: Acetaminophen is not associated with an increased prevalence of congenital abnormalities overall or with any specific group of major abnormalities.
PubMed ID
18226618 View in PubMed
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Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical activity before and during pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63107
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Marie Lof
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoping, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running - physiology
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Human pregnancy is associated with increased requirements for dietary energy and this increase may be partly offset by reductions in physical activity during gestation. Studies in well-nourished women have shown that the physical activity level (PAL), obtained as the total energy expenditure (TEE) divided by the BMR, decreases in late pregnancy. However, it is not known if this decrease is really caused by reductions in physical activity or if it is the result of decreases in energy expenditure/BMR (the so-called metabolic equivalent, MET) for many activities in late pregnancy. In the present study activity pattern, TEE and BMR were assessed in twenty-three healthy Swedish women before pregnancy as well as in gestational weeks 14 and 32. Activity pattern was assessed using a questionnaire and heart rate recording. TEE was assessed using the doubly labelled water method and BMR was measured by means of indirect calorimetry. When compared to the pre-pregnant value, there was little change in the PAL in gestational week 14 but it was significantly reduced in gestational week 32. Results obtained by means of the questionnaire and by heart rate recording showed that the activity pattern was largely unaffected by pregnancy. The findings support the following conclusion: in a population of well-nourished women where the activity pattern is maintained during pregnancy, the increase in BMR represents approximately the main part of the pregnancy-induced increase in TEE, at least until gestational week 32.
PubMed ID
16469145 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences influence development of pain during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266646
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jennifer Drevin
Jenny Stern
Eva-Maria Annerbäck
Magnus Peterson
Stephen Butler
Tanja Tydén
Anna Berglund
Margareta Larsson
Per Kristiansson
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):840-6
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and pain with onset during pregnancy.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighteen antenatal clinics in southern Mid-Sweden.
Of 293 women invited to participate, 232 (79%) women agreed to participate in early pregnancy and were assessed in late pregnancy.
Questionnaires were distributed in early and late pregnancy. The questionnaires sought information on socio-demography, ACE, pain location by pain drawing and pain intensity by visual analogue scales. Distribution of pain was coded in 41 predetermined areas.
Pain in third trimester with onset during present pregnancy: intensity, location and number of pain locations.
In late pregnancy, 62% of the women reported any ACE and 72% reported any pain location with onset during the present pregnancy. Among women reporting any ACE the median pain intensity was higher compared with women without such an experience (p = 0.01). The accumulated ACE displayed a positive association with the number of reported pain locations in late pregnancy (rs = 0.19, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for background factors in multiple regression analysis (p = 0.01). When ACE was dichotomized the prevalence of pain did not differ between women with and without ACE. The subgroup of women reporting physical abuse as a child reported a higher prevalence of sacral and pelvic pain (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.02, respectively).
Adverse childhood experiences were associated with higher pain intensities and larger pain distributions in late pregnancy, which are risk factors for transition to chronic pain postpartum.
PubMed ID
25965273 View in PubMed
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Agricultural work during pregnancy and selected structural malformations in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216320
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
T. Nurminen
K. Rantala
K. Kurppa
P C Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):23-30
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Agriculture
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System - abnormalities
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure
Mouth Abnormalities - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We studied the relation between birth defects and maternal agricultural work in a nationwide time- and area-matched case-referent series of 1,306 pairs of infants (581 orofacial clefts, 365 central nervous system defects, 360 skeletal defects) obtained through the Finnish Register of Congenital Malformations. We supplemented the Register data, including the mothers' latest and previous pregnancies, diseases, consumption of drugs and alcohol, smoking habits, and the like, with detailed interviews on the mothers' work conditions. When all of the birth defects were pooled and agricultural work was compared with nonagricultural work in the first trimester of pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.9-2.0]. For orofacial clefts, the corresponding odds ratio was 1.9 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5). An industrial hygienist's blinded assessment indicated that seven mothers of infants with orofacial clefts and three reference mothers had been exposed to pesticides in agricultural work; the adjusted odds ratio for work with pesticide exposure, when compared with unexposed agricultural work, was 1.9 (95% CI = 0.4-8.3). Exposure to solvents did not explain the observed association.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):6-77888447
PubMed ID
7888440 View in PubMed
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447 records – page 1 of 45.