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355 records – page 1 of 36.

A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer significantly improves the reproductive outcome in infertile women: a prospective, randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76364
Source
Fertil Steril. 2006 May;85(5):1341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Lars G Westergaard
Qunhui Mao
Marianne Krogslund
Steen Sandrini
Suzan Lenz
Jørgen Grinsted
Author Affiliation
Fertility Clinic Trianglen, Hellerup, Denmark. l.g.westergaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2006 May;85(5):1341-6
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - psychology
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryo Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on reproductive outcome in patients treated with IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). One group of patients received acupuncture on the day of ET, another group on ET day and again 2 days later (i.e., closer to implantation day), and both groups were compared with a control group that did not receive acupuncture. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized trial. SETTING: Private fertility center. PATIENT(S): During the study period all patients receiving IVF or ICSI treatment were offered participation in the study. On the day of oocyte retrieval, patients were randomly allocated (with sealed envelopes) to receive acupuncture on the day of ET (ACU 1 group, n = 95), on that day and again 2 days later (ACU 2 group, n = 91), or no acupuncture (control group, n = 87). INTERVENTION(S): Acupuncture was performed immediately before and after ET (ACU 1 and 2 groups), with each session lasting 25 minutes; and one 25-minute session was performed 2 days later in the ACU 2 group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Clinical pregnancy and ongoing pregnancy rates in the three groups. RESULT(S): Clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates were significantly higher in the ACU 1 group as compared with controls (37 of 95 [39%] vs. 21 of 87 [26%] and 34 of 95 [36%] vs. 19 of 87 [22%]). The clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in the ACU 2 group (36% and 26%) were higher than in controls, but the difference did not reach statistical difference. CONCLUSION(S): Acupuncture on the day of ET significantly improves the reproductive outcome of IVF/ICSI, compared with no acupuncture. Repeating acupuncture on ET day +2 provided no additional beneficial effect.
Notes
Comment In: Fertil Steril. 2006 May;85(5):1362-3; discussion 1368-7016600223
Comment In: Fertil Steril. 2006 May;85(5):1364-7; discussion 1368-7016600221
PubMed ID
16600232 View in PubMed
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Advanced maternal age and the outcomes of preterm neonates: a social paradox?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131136
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Jaideep Kanungo
Andrew James
Douglas McMillan
Abhay Lodha
Daniel Faucher
Shoo K Lee
Prakesh S Shah
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Chorioamnionitis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Steroids - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the effect of maternal age on survival free of major morbidity among preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation at birth.
Data from a retrospective cohort of preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival without major morbidity (defined as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3 or 4, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity stage 3, 4 or 5, or necrotizing enterocolitis stage 2 or 3). Trends in outcomes in relation to maternal age groups were examined using a multivariable analysis that controlled for confounders.
Baseline comparison for the 12,326 eligible newborns revealed no differences in sex, small-for-gestational-age status, and chorioamnionitis among different maternal age groups. Higher rates of cesarean delivery, use of prenatal steroids, maternal hypertension, and diabetes were noted as maternal age increased (P
PubMed ID
21934451 View in PubMed
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Advanced Maternal Age and the Risk of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery: a Within-Family Analysis Using Finnish Population Registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287605
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Alice Goisis
Hanna Remes
Kieron Barclay
Pekka Martikainen
Mikko Myrskylä
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Certificates
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Siblings
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a major risk factor for birth outcomes. It is unclear to what extent this association is confounded by maternal characteristics. To test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birth weight (
PubMed ID
29206985 View in PubMed
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Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Adolescents Compared with Normal Weight Adolescents and Low Risk Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299300
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2019 Apr; 32(2):139-145
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Anna Ramö Isgren
Preben Kjølhede
Marie Blomberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2019 Apr; 32(2):139-145
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pediatric Obesity - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the association between maternal body mass index and neonatal outcomes in adolescents and to compare neonatal outcomes between overweight and obese adolescents and obstetric low-risk adult women.
Retrospective cohort study using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register.
Sweden.
All 31,386 primiparous adolescents younger than 20 years of age and 178,844 "standard" women, defined as normal weight, obstetric low-risk adult women who delivered between 1992 and 2013. The adolescents were categorized according to weight and height in early pregnancy into body mass index groups according to the World Health Organization classification. Logistic regression models were used.
Neonatal outcomes in relation to maternal body mass index groups.
In the adolescents, 6109/31,386 (19.5%) and 2287/31,386 (7.3%) were overweight and obese, respectively. Compared with normal weight adolescents, overweight adolescents had a lower risk of having small for gestational age neonates, and higher risks for having neonates with macrosomia, and being large for gestational age and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes. The obese adolescents had increased risk for having neonates being large for gestational age (3.8% vs 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.30-3.84]), with macrosomia (>4500 g) (4.6% vs 1.4%; aOR, 2.95 [95% CI, 2.33-3.73]), and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes (2.2% vs 1.1%; aOR, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.43-2.76]) than normal weight adolescents. Compared with the standard women, overweight and obese adolescents had overall more adverse neonatal outcomes.
Overweight and obese adolescents had predominantly increased risks for adverse neonatal outcomes compared with normal weight adolescents and standard women.
PubMed ID
30453030 View in PubMed
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Adverse outcomes of pregnancy in women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277352
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Hannes Hagström
Jonas Höijer
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Matteo Bottai
Anders Ekbom
Rolf Hultcrantz
Olof Stephansson
Knut Stokkeland
Source
Liver Int. 2016 Feb;36(2):268-74
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease - complications - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common liver disease in the world, but little is known about its potential association with pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pregnancy outcomes in NAFLD.
The Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) was used to identify births between 1992 and 2011 (N = 1 960 416). By linkage with the National Patient Register, we identified women with a diagnosis of NAFLD. The MBR was then used to identify outcomes: gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, Caesarean section, Apgar score
PubMed ID
26114995 View in PubMed
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Adverse perinatal outcomes associated with moderate or severe maternal anaemia based on parity in Finland during 2006-10.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263229
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;28(5):372-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sari Räisänen
Vijaya Kancherla
Mika Gissler
Michael R Kramer
Seppo Heinonen
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;28(5):372-80
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaemia during pregnancy is an important public health problem. We investigated whether the association between maternal anaemia during pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes differed between nulliparous and multiparous women.
A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted using data on all singleton births (n?=?290?662) recorded in the Finnish Medical Birth Register during 2006-10. Maternal anaemia was defined as a maternal haemoglobin level of
PubMed ID
24938307 View in PubMed
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Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296661
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-03-2018
Author
Anna A Usynina
Vitaly Postoev
Jon Øyvind Odland
Andrej M Grjibovski
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø 9037, Norway. perinat@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 02 03; 15(2):
Date
02-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Body Weight
Delivery, Obstetric
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Reproductive Tract Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012-2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (
PubMed ID
29401677 View in PubMed
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The All Our Babies pregnancy cohort: design, methods, and participant characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115873
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheila W McDonald
Andrew W Lyon
Karen M Benzies
Deborah A McNeil
Stephen J Lye
Siobhan M Dolan
Craig E Pennell
Alan D Bocking
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. sheilaw.mcdonald@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S2
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Child
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Gene-Environment Interaction
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Design
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The prospective cohort study design is ideal for examining diseases of public health importance, as its inherent temporal nature renders it advantageous for studying early life influences on health outcomes and research questions of aetiological significance. This paper will describe the development and characteristics of the All Our Babies (AOB) study, a prospective pregnancy cohort in Calgary, Alberta, Canada designed to examine determinants of maternal, infant, and child outcomes and identify barriers and facilitators in health care utilization.
Women were recruited from health care offices, communities, and through Calgary Laboratory Services before 25 weeks gestation from May 2008 to December 2010. Participants completed two questionnaires during pregnancy, a third at 4 months postpartum, and are currently being followed-up with questionnaires at 12, 24, and 36 months. Data was collected on pregnancy history, demographics, lifestyle, health care utilization, physical and mental health, parenting, and child developmental outcomes and milestones. In addition, biological/serological and genetic markers can be extracted from collected maternal and cord blood samples.
A total of 4011 pregnant women were eligible for recruitment into the AOB study. Of this, 3388 women completed at least one survey. The majority of participants were less than 35 years of age, Caucasian, Canadian born, married or in a common-law relationship, well-educated, and reported household incomes above the Calgary median. Women who discontinued after the first survey (n=123) were typically younger, non-Caucasian, foreign-born, had lower education and household income levels, were less likely to be married or in a common-law relationship, and had poor psychosocial health in early pregnancy. In general, AOB participants reflect the pregnant and parenting population at local and provincial levels, and perinatal indicators from the study are comparable to perinatal surveillance data.
The extensive and rich data collected in the AOB cohort provides the opportunity to answer complex questions about the relationships between biology, early experiences, and developmental outcomes. This cohort will contribute to the understanding of the biologic mechanisms and social/environmental pathways underlying associations between early and later life outcomes, gene-environment interactions, and developmental trajectories among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23445747 View in PubMed
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Analysis of perinatal mortality at a teaching hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1999-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79181
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Kidanto Hussein L
Massawe Siriel N
Nystrom Lennarth
Lindmark Gunilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. hkidanto@muchs.ac.tz
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Tanzania - epidemiology
Abstract
We conducted a retrospective analysis of perinatal mortality at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania 1999-2003 in order to categorise/classify perinatal deaths as well as to identify key factors in perinatal care that could be improved. Data were retrieved from the MNH obstetric database and causes of early neonatal deaths were traced from the neonatal ward register. The study includes all foetuses weighing =500g. A modified Nordic-Baltic classification was used for classification of perinatal deaths. Over a 5-year period there were 77,815 babies born with a perinatal mortality rate of 124 per 1000 births, 78% of which was labour related stillbirth. The PMR was 913/1000 for singleton births and 723/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing less than 1500 grams and 65/1000 for singleton births and 116/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing 2500 grams or more. Babies weighing less than 1500 grams contributed 26% of PMR, whereas 41% occurred in babies weighing 2500 grams or more. The majority (79%) of neonatal deaths had Apgar score
PubMed ID
17217119 View in PubMed
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355 records – page 1 of 36.