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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a New Nordic Diet score and its association with gestational weight gain and fetal growth - a study performed in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263466
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):1909-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Elisabet R Hillesund
Elling Bere
Margaretha Haugen
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):1909-18
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Development
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - prevention & control
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Models, Biological
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
To construct a diet score for assessing degree of adherence to a healthy and environmentally friendly New Nordic Diet (NND) and to investigate its association with adequacy of gestational weight gain and fetal growth in a large prospective birth cohort.
Main exposure was NND adherence, categorized as low, medium or high adherence. Main outcomes were adequacy of gestational weight gain, described as inadequate, optimal or excessive according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines, and fetal growth, categorized as being small, appropriate or large for gestational age. Associations of NND adherence with gestational weight gain and fetal growth were estimated with multinomial logistic regression in crude and adjusted models.
Norway.
Women (n 66 597) from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Higher NND adherence implied higher energy and nutrient intakes, higher nutrient density and a healthier macronutrient distribution. Normal-weight women with high as compared with low NND adherence had lower adjusted odds of excessive gestational weight gain (OR=0·93; 95 % CI 0·87, 0·99; P=0·024). High as compared with low NND adherence was associated with reduced odds of the infant being born small for gestational age (OR=0·92; 95 % CI 0·86, 0·99; P=0·025) and with higher odds of the baby being born large for gestational age (OR=1·07; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·15; P=0·048).
The NND score captures diet quality. Adherence to a regional diet including a large representation of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, potatoes, fish, game, milk and drinking water during pregnancy may facilitate optimal gestational weight gain in normal-weight women and improve fetal growth in general.
PubMed ID
24685309 View in PubMed
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Dysglycemia and a history of reproductive risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157373
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 Aug;31(8):1635-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Sarah D McDonald
Salim Yusuf
Patrick Sheridan
Sonia S Anand
Hertzel C Gerstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, McMaster Universityand Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. mcdonals@mcmaster.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 Aug;31(8):1635-8
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Glucose Intolerance - blood - drug therapy
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Parity
Poverty
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ramipril - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Thiazolidinediones - therapeutic use
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify reproductive risk factors associated with dysglycemia (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and impaired fasting glucose) in a contemporary multiethnic population.
We studied 14,661 women screened with an oral glucose tolerance test for the Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) trial. Reproductive risk factors were compared in normoglycemic and dysglycemic women.
Dysglycemia was significantly associated with the number of children born (odds ratio 1.03 per child [95% CI 1.01-1.05]), age (1.05 per year [1.04-1.05]), non-European ancestry (1.09 [1.01-1.17]), preeclampsia/eclampsia (1.14 [1.02-1.27]), irregular periods (1.21 [1.07-1.36]), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (1.53 [1.35-1.74]). The relationship between GDM and dysglycemia did not differ across BMI tertiles (P = 0.84) nor did the relationships of other risk factors.
Reproductive factors, particularly GDM, are associated with dysglycemia in middle-aged women from many ethnicities. Reproductive factors can be used to counsel young women about their future risk of dysglycemia, whereas in middle age they may help screen for dysglycemia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18458144 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of antenatal care: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59471
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1993 Aug;100(8):727-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
B. Backe
J. Nakling
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Hospital Research, Trondheim.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1993 Aug;100(8):727-32
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breech Presentation
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Placenta Previa - diagnosis
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prenatal Care - standards
Prenatal Diagnosis
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Twins
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the effectiveness of antenatal care as a screening for nonsymptomatic disease and obstetrical risk conditions. DESIGN: Programme evaluation of antenatal care in a geographically based cohort. SETTING: Routine clinical practice in primary and specialist level of health care without intervention. SUBJECTS: One thousand nine hundred and eight women residing in one Norwegian county giving birth during a 12 month period, 1988 to 1989. OUTCOME MEASURES: The detection rates at the time of delivery, for women with five conditions: twin pregnancies, placenta praevia, breech presentation, small for gestational age (SGA) and pre-eclampsia. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-two women had one or more of the actual conditions, 124 (42%) had been diagnosed at the time of the delivery. The detection rate for SGA was remarkably low (14%). The detection rates for pre-eclampsia (75%), breech presentation (69%), placenta praevia (57%) and twin pregnancies (94%) were in the same range as results reported in the literature. The number of false positive antenatal diagnosis was insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Assessing the effectiveness of antenatal diagnosis of growth retardation is connected with major unsolved methodological problems. Clinical management of such cases may be better than indicated by the results based on the ultimate SGA classification. For important obstetrical conditions this study describes an applicable method for practical evaluation of the effectiveness of antenatal care. Areas where care could be improved are demonstrated.
PubMed ID
8399010 View in PubMed
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Effects of a population-based smoking cessation programme on smoking in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192104
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):446-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
N. Jaakkola
K. Zahlsen
J J Jaakkola
Author Affiliation
Environmental Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):446-9
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
National Health Programs
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prenatal Care
Program Evaluation
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity population-based smoking cessation programme in maternity care clinics. Quitting smoking during pregnancy was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire and verified by hair nicotine concentration. In the intervention area, 58/306 women (19.0%) reported quitting smoking during pregnancy whereas in the reference area the numbers were 22/152 (14.5%) (difference = 4.5%, 95% confidence interval: -2.6%-11.6%). The intervention group indicated that they received more information on adverse effects of smoking, studied the material more actively, and felt that material from maternity care influenced their smoking behaviour more than the reference group.
PubMed ID
11766488 View in PubMed
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Equality in health and health care during pregnancy. A prospective population-based study from southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64673
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Oct;73(9):674-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
A. Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Oct;73(9):674-9
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Humans
Occupations
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Women, Working
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. To study health and health care during pregnancy for manual workers compared with non-manual employees. DESIGN. A prospective population-based study of all women who were registered for antenatal care during 1986 in the catchment areas of three health centers. SETTING. Three district antenatal clinics in southern Sweden. SUBJECTS. 409 pregnant women; of whom 403 with singleton pregnancies; of whom 185 were manual workers and 175 were non-manual employees. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Problems encountered (registered according to the international classification of diseases) and measures taken. RESULTS. The study population resembled all women who gave birth in Sweden during the same year. Both manual workers and non-manual employees registered for antenatal care in early pregnancy (96% and 97%, respectively, before 15 completed weeks). The women in both groups made the same number of visits to the antenatal clinics (median 12 and 13, respectively). There were no differences between the two groups of women as regards the percentage figures for obstetric problems encountered during pregnancy. The manual workers had a higher frequency of diseases of the musculoskeletal system (mainly low-back pain) compared with the non-manual employees (RR = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.20-2.98), and they were sicklisted more often (RR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.01-1.46). On the other hand, their frequency of amniocentesis was lower (RR = 0.39; 95% CI = 0.19-0.80); the reason for this was that the manual workers were younger than the non-manual employees. Otherwise, there were no differences between the two groups of women as regards the percentage figures, either for non-obstetric problems encountered, or measures taken, or regarding the outcome of pregnancy. CONCLUSION. In Sweden, both manual and non-manual working women appear to enjoy equal antenatal health and receive equal antenatal care. This conclusion is based on a small study population, meticulously monitored prospectively throughout pregnancy.
PubMed ID
7976239 View in PubMed
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Health benefits of physical activity during pregnancy: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121580
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Feb;45(2):268-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Lanay M Mudd
Katrine M Owe
Michelle F Mottola
James M Pivarnik
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. mudd@msu.edu
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Feb;45(2):268-77
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Composition
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - physiopathology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Leisure Activities
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Risk assessment
Scandinavia - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
While early studies on the effects of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) during pregnancy were concerned about possible harm to the mother or fetus, these fears have not been substantiated. Instead, a growing body of literature has documented several health benefits related to pregnancy LTPA. The purpose of this article was to synthesize evidence from epidemiological studies conducted in the United States, Canada, and Scandinavia on the benefits of LTPA and exercise during pregnancy with regard to maternal health, pregnancy outcomes, and child health. We focused on studies evaluating relations between pregnancy LTPA and gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders, excessive gestational weight gain, birth weight, timing of delivery, and child body composition. The bulk of evidence supports beneficial effects of pregnancy LTPA on each outcome; however, most previous studies have been observational and used self-reported LTPA at only one or two time points in pregnancy. Limitations of the current knowledge base and suggestions for future research on the health benefits of LTPA during pregnancy are provided.
PubMed ID
22895379 View in PubMed
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Impact of prenatal glucose screening on the diagnosis of gestational diabetes and on pregnancy outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196334
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 1;152(11):1009-14; discussion 1015-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2000
Author
S W Wen
S. Liu
M S Kramer
K S Joseph
C. Levitt
S. Marcoux
R M Liston
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Shi_Wu_Wen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Dec 1;152(11):1009-14; discussion 1015-6
Date
Dec-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Risk
Abstract
The authors examined the impact of universal screening on the diagnosis of gestational diabetes and its complications. All mothers and newborns registered by the Canadian Institute for Health Information from 1984 to 1996 (even-numbered fiscal years only) were included in the analysis. Over this time period, the proportion of women with gestational diabetes increased ninefold (from 0.3% to 2.7%) while the proportion with prepregnancy diabetes fell from 0.7% to 0.4%. As rates of gestational diabetes increased, a corresponding reduction in the risks of complications (polyhydramnios, amniotic cavity infection, cesarean delivery, and preeclampsia) occurred for women with gestational diabetes. The incidence of gestational diabetes fell in Metro-Hamilton (where screening was discontinued in 1989) but remained high in the rest of Ontario (where screening continued in most areas). No related temporal trends for fetal macrosomia, cesarean delivery, or other diabetes-related complications were observed, regardless of screening policy. The authors concluded that the substantial increase in gestational diabetes in Canada is an artifact caused by universal screening, with no evidence of beneficial effects on pregnancy outcomes.
PubMed ID
11117609 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.