Skip header and navigation

Refine By

99 records – page 1 of 10.

Age at childhood infections and risk of atopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31597
Source
Thorax. 2002 May;57(5):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
P. Bager
T. Westergaard
K. Rostgaard
H. Hjalgrim
M. Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, 5 Artillerivej, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
Thorax. 2002 May;57(5):379-82
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Chickenpox - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology
Infant
Infection - complications - epidemiology
Measles - complications - epidemiology
Mumps - complications - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rubella - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that early age at exposure to common childhood infections is associated with a decreased risk of allergy. Previous studies on the possible association between allergy and infection with measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella have not been conclusive as most did not include information on exact age at exposure. The objective of our study was to investigate whether early age at exposure to these infections was associated with a decreased risk of atopy using information on exact age at infection. METHODS: The study population consisted of 889 pregnant women who participated in a national birth cohort study in Denmark and for whom detailed information on history of measles, rubella, varicella, and mumps before school entry (age 7 years) was available from school health records from Copenhagen. Atopic status was assessed serologically by a specific response to 11 common inhalant allergens using serum samples obtained from the women during pregnancy. RESULTS: Measles in the first year of life was associated with a higher risk of atopy than no measles before age 7 years (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.47 to 7.68). There was no association between atopy and mumps, rubella, or varicella in the first 7 years of life or with measles acquired after the first year of life. The risk of atopy increased significantly with increasing number of childhood infections in the first 2 years of life (p(trend)=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: These findings do not support the suggestion that childhood exposure to measles, rubella, varicella, or mumps protects against atopy, even if acquired very early in life.
PubMed ID
11978910 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anal incontinence and Quality of Life in late pregnancy: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103050
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jul;121(8):978-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
H H Johannessen
S. Mørkved
A. Stordahl
L. Sandvik
A. Wibe
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Østfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway; Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jul;121(8):978-87
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery, Obstetric
Depression - epidemiology
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Flatulence - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Abstract
To evaluate the association between different types of anal incontinence (AI) and Quality of Life (QoL) in late pregnancy.
Cross-sectional study.
Two maternity units in Norway 2009-2010.
Primiparae aged 18 or over.
Participants answered questions about AI during the last 4 weeks of pregnancy on the St. Mark's score and impact of QoL in the Fecal Incontinence QoL score. Socioeconomic data were obtained from hospital records.
Self-reported AI and impact on QoL.
1571 primiparae responded; 573 (37%) had experienced AI during the last 4 weeks of pregnancy. One third of the incontinent women reported reduced QoL in the domain 'Coping'. 'Women experiencing urgency alone reported markedly better QoL compared to any other AI symptoms. AI appeared to have the strongest impact on the domains 'Coping' and 'Embarrassment'. Depression was only associated with experiencing the combination of all three symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 13; 95%confidence interval (CI) 3.2-51]. Experiencing flatus alone weekly or more was associated with the highest impact on 'Embarrassment' (OR 20; 95%CI 6.4-61) compared with all other symptoms or combination of AI symptoms, except the combination of all three AI symptoms.
Between 3 and 10% of the primiparae in this material experienced AI to such a extent that it affected QoL. The greatest impact was seen in the QoL domain 'Coping'. These findings highlight the importance of an increased awareness of AI in late pregnancy among health professionals and the need to implement routine discussions about AI with expectant and new mothers.
PubMed ID
24589074 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between gaseous ambient air pollutants and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Vancouver, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183028
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Nov;111(14):1773-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Shiliang Liu
Daniel Krewski
Yuanli Shi
Yue Chen
Richard T Burnett
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Sliu@uottawa.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Nov;111(14):1773-8
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Obstetric labor, premature
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Abstract
The association between ambient air pollution and adverse health effects, such as emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and mortality from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, has been studied extensively in many countries, including Canada. Recently, studies conducted in China, the Czech Republic, and the United States have related ambient air pollution to adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this study, we examined association between preterm birth, low birth weight, and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) among singleton live births and ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone in Vancouver, Canada, for 1985-1998. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for such effects. Low birth weight was associated with exposure to SO2 during the first month of pregnancy (OR = 1.11, 95% CI, 1.01-1.22, for a 5.0 ppb increase). Preterm birth was associated with exposure to SO2 (OR = 1.09, 95% CI, 1.01-1.19, for a 5.0 ppb increase) and to CO (OR = 1.08, 95% CI, 1.01-1.15, for a 1.0 ppm increase) during the last month of pregnancy. IUGR was associated with exposure to SO2 (OR = 1.07, 95% CI, 1.01-1.13, for a 5.0 ppb increase), to NO2 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI, 1.01-1.10, for a 10.0 ppb increase), and to CO (OR = 1.06, 95% CI, 1.01-1.10, for a 1.0 ppm increase) during the first month of pregnancy. In conclusion, relatively low concentrations of gaseous air pollutants are associated with adverse effects on birth outcomes in populations experiencing diverse air pollution profiles.
Notes
Cites: Mutat Res. 1993 Oct;289(2):145-557690882
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Oct;74(9):693-77572102
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1993;15(2):414-438174665
Cites: Health Rep. 1993;5(3):281-908199330
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;50(6):407-158572718
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Feb 17;312(7028):410-48601112
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 Aug;104 Suppl 4:699-7148879999
Cites: Environ Res. 1997 Jan;72(1):24-319012369
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Nov;10(6):666-7010535778
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Mar 15;151(6):602-1310733042
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 2000 Jan-Feb;55(1):26-3010735516
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Aug 16;284(7):843-910938173
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Sep;11(5):502-1110955401
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 14;343(24):1742-911114312
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):817-2611682364
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Jan 1;155(1):17-2511772780
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Mar 6;287(9):1132-4111879110
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2000;12 Suppl 4:15-3912881885
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1979 Mar 30;48(1 Pt 1):19-28452041
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 1980 Jan;5(1):3-97376198
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1986 Oct;93(10):1049-593790464
Cites: Pediatrics. 1987 Oct;80(4):502-113658568
Cites: Hereditas. 1987;107(2):197-2033436831
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1991 Aug;4(8):700-81930853
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992 May;166(5):1515-281595807
Cites: Lancet. 1993 Apr 10;341(8850):938-418096277
Cites: Horm Res. 1992;38(5-6):208-101307737
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 31;349(9065):1582-79174559
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 May;105(5):514-209222137
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Mar;8(2):162-79229208
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Jun;105(6):608-129288495
Cites: Environ Mol Mutagen. 1997;30(2):184-959329643
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Feb 1;147(3):309-149482506
Cites: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1998 Aug;48(8):689-7009739623
Cites: Cancer Res. 1998 Sep 15;58(18):4122-69751623
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jan;107(1):17-259872713
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1999 Jan;13(1):35-579987784
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107(6):475-8010339448
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:451-6010346993
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 Aug;56(8):539-4310492651
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Jul;11(4):427-3310874550
Cites: Environ Res. 1994 Jan;64(1):36-528287841
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1994 Dec;129(2):264-717992316
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):A792; author reply A792-415471710
PubMed ID
14594630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123402
Source
BJOG. 2012 Aug;119(9):1108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
V. Aasheim
U. Waldenström
A. Hjelmstedt
S. Rasmussen
H. Pettersson
E. Schytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. vaa@hib.no
Source
BJOG. 2012 Aug;119(9):1108-16
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Employment
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Reproductive health
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate if advanced maternal age at first birth increases the risk of psychological distress during pregnancy at 17 and 30 weeks of gestation and at 6 and 18 months after birth.
National cohort study.
Norway.
A total of 19 291 nulliparous women recruited between 1999 and 2008 from hospitals and maternity units.
Questionnaire data were obtained from the longitudinal Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, and register data from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced maternal age was defined as = 32 years and a reference group of women aged 25-31 years was used for comparisons. The distribution of psychological distress from 20 to = 40 years was investigated, and the prevalence of psychological distress at the four time-points was estimated. Logistic regression analyses based on generalised estimation equations were used to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress.
Psychological distress measured by SCL-5.
Women of advanced age had slightly higher scores of psychological distress over the period than the reference group, also after controlling for obstetric and infant variables. The youngest women had the highest scores. A history of depression increased the risk of distress in all women. With no history of depression, women of advanced age were not at higher risk. Changes over time were similar between groups and lowest at 6 months.
Women of 32 years and beyond had slightly increased risk of psychological distress during pregnancy and the first 18 months of motherhood compared with women aged 25-31 years.
PubMed ID
22703587 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asymptomatic myasthenia gravis influences pregnancy and birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30215
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2004 Aug;11(8):559-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
J M Hoff
A K Daltveit
N E Gilhus
Author Affiliation
Section for Neurology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. jana.midelfart.hoff@helse-bergen.no
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2004 Aug;11(8):559-62
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Myasthenia Gravis - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Women with myasthenia gravis (MG) have an increased risk of complications and adverse pregnancy outcome. This study has examined if this is true also for asymptomatic MG. Using data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, births of women prior to receiving an MG diagnosis or in complete clinical MG remission were compared with all non-MG births in Norway in the same period (1967-2000). Forty-nine births occurred in 37 women, 11 of them in clinical remission, and six thymectomized. The perinatal mortality was increased (P = 0.02) and induction of birth (P = 0.007) occurred more frequently. Protracted labor occurred more frequently in the target group (P = 0.03). One of the three children that died had Potter's syndrome. Both mothers with children who died were in complete clinical MG remission. One had previously given and one subsequently gave birth to a child with neonatal MG. The results indicate that complications in birth and pregnancy are not only related to clinical MG disease severity but to the underlying immunological dysfunction.
PubMed ID
15272902 View in PubMed
Less detail

At what age does the risk for adverse maternal and infant outcomes increase? Nationwide register-based study on first births in Finland in 2005-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280373
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Dec;95(12):1368-1375
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Reija Klemetti
Mika Gissler
Susanna Sainio
Elina Hemminki
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Dec;95(12):1368-1375
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Perinatal mortality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
It is poorly understood if there are specific ages at which adverse outcomes during pregnancy and childbirth start to increase (threshold-ages). The purpose of this study was to examine at which maternal ages the use of maternity care and the risks for adverse maternal and infant outcomes increase.
National data from the Finnish Medical Birth Register including all first-time mothers aged 20 years or over with singleton pregnancies in 2005-2014 were analyzed (n = 228 348). Odds ratios for each outcome at different ages were calculated by logistic regression, using women aged 20-24 (n = 56 282) as the reference and adjusting for socioeconomic position and urbanity of residence. The threshold-age was defined as the first significant adjusted odds ratio after which the risk remained significant.
The threshold-ages for use of maternity care varied from 25 years for cesarean section (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03-1.14) to 38 years for having 16 or more antenatal visits (1.13, 1.04-1.21). Four threshold-ages were found for maternal health outcomes: 25 years for gestational diabetes (OR 1.15, 1.09-1.23), 27 years for placenta previa (OR 1.75, 1.11-2.75), 33 years for gestational hypertension (1.14, 1.03-1.27), and 38 years for preeclampsia (OR 1.48, 1.12-1.96). The threshold-ages for infant health outcomes varied from 28 years for preterm birth (37 weeks, OR 1.10, 1.02-1.19) to 36 years for perinatal mortality (OR 2.10, 1.44-3.07).
Different threshold-ages were identified. Most adverse outcomes occurred earlier than the traditional cut-off ages for high risk pregnancy, which have been set at 35 or 40 years.
PubMed ID
27623182 View in PubMed
Less detail

BMI, pain and hyper-mobility are determinants of long-term outcome for women with low back pain and pelvic pain during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82935
Source
Eur Spine J. 2006 Jul;15(7):1093-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mogren Ingrid M
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingrid.mogren@obgyn.umu.se
Source
Eur Spine J. 2006 Jul;15(7):1093-102
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amenorrhea - complications
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Multivariate Analysis
Pain Measurement
Parity
Pelvic Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Low back pain and pelvic pain (LBPP) is common during pregnancy and up to 40% of women still have symptoms half a year after delivery. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants and the prevalence of persistent LBPP after pregnancy in a Swedish cohort. In a previous study 891 women had responded to a questionnaire on risk factors and prevalence of LBPP during pregnancy. Altogether 72% (n=639) of the women had reported LBPP during pregnancy. These respondents were sent a second questionnaire at approximately 6 months after delivery. The response rate was 72.6% (n=464). Independent t-test and Pearson's chi-squared test were used to test the difference between the two groups. In response to the questionnaire, 43.1% of the women reported persistent LBPP 6 months after delivery. Women with persistent LBPP after pregnancy had had significantly earlier onset of pain during pregnancy, higher maternal age, higher body mass index (BMI), and assessed a higher level of pain due to LBPP during pregnancy and after pregnancy, and included a higher proportion of women with joint hyper-mobility. In summary, recurrent or continuous LBPP is prevalent after pregnancy. BMI as well as hyper-mobility are prominent determinants of persistent LBPP after pregnancy. Level and onset of pain during pregnancy were strong predictors of persistent LBPP.
PubMed ID
16404613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of pregnant women who engage in binge alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209012
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):789-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1997
Author
J. Gladstone
M. Levy
I. Nulman
G. Koren
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology/Toxicology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):789-94
Date
Mar-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cocaine
Counseling
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To characterize pregnant women who engage in binge drinking and to identify other risk behaviour that these women engage in.
Observational study based on retrospective review of records.
A telephone and outpatient counselling service in Toronto that advises pregnant women about exposure to drugs, chemicals, radiation and infections during pregnancy and lactation.
All pregnant women who sought counselling concerning fetal risk of exposure to binge drinking from 1985 to 1994 as well as those counselled by telephone from 1993 to 1994, and an equal number of control women who sought counselling.
Information about binges, demographic factors, history of elective and spontaneous abortion, and use of psychotropic drugs and cigarettes as well as marijuana, cocaine and other illicit drugs.
Of the 3800 women seen in the clinic, 119 (3.1%) reported binge drinking during pregnancy; of the 19,991 women counselled by telephone, 153 (0.8%) reported binge drinking during pregnancy. The mean number of drinks per binge was 7.2 (standard deviation 2.5). None of the women was an alcoholic; 83.1% had binged fewer than 10 times during their pregnancy. A large majority (84.0%) of the women had a binge early in the first trimester (before 6 weeks' gestation). In comparison with control women, the women who had engaged in binge drinking were significantly younger (mean 30.0 v. 27.9 years, p
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Mar 15;156(6):807-89084386
PubMed ID
9084383 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comparative evaluation of the health status of descendants of people residing in environmentally unfriendly regions by means of mathematical modeling].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262241
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(5):66-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Iu A Dudareva
V A Gur'eva
S V Dronov
Ia N Shoikhet
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(5):66-70
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Effect
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Illness - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Models, Theoretical
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Radioactive Hazard Release - statistics & numerical data
Reproductive Health - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate reproductive health of descendants of people who experienced effects of adverse environmental factors, such as radiation and chemical contamination (the descendants themselves were unaffected by these factors). Reproductive health of women was assessed by mathematical modeling. Factors of greatest importance for the health status of the descendants were distinguished among the 76 ones studied. It was shown that reproductive health of the subjects descending from the people exposed to radiation deteriorated more significantly than of those whose ancestors were affected by chemical factors.
PubMed ID
25782311 View in PubMed
Less detail

99 records – page 1 of 10.