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Absence of human bocavirus from deceased fetuses and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146525
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anita Riipinen
Elina Väisänen
Anne Lahtinen
Riitta Karikoski
Mika Nuutila
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Helena Taskinen
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anita.riipinen@ttl.fi
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Fetus - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Heart - virology
Human bocavirus - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Liver - virology
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Placenta - virology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The human bocavirus (HBoV), a newly discovered parvovirus, is closely related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, which are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Another human parvovirus, B19, can lead to fetal hydrops, miscarriage and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD).
To determine the prevalence of HBoV DNA in aborted fetuses and IUFDs. The HBoV serology of the mothers was also studied.
We retrospectively studied all available fetuses (N=535) autopsied during 7/1992-12/1995, and 1/2003-12/2005 in Helsinki, Finland. All available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded fetal tissues - placenta, heart and liver - of 120 miscarriages, 169 IUFDs, and 246 induced abortions were studied by quantitative PCR. We also measured the HBoV IgM and IgG antibodies in the corresponding maternal sera (N=462) mostly of the first trimester. The IgM-positive sera underwent HBoV PCR.
None of the fetal tissues harbored HBoV DNA. A total of 97% (448/462) of the mothers were positive for IgG antibodies to HBoV, while only 0.9% (4/462) exhibited HBoV-specific IgM antibodies without viremia or respiratory symptoms. One IgM-positive mother had an unexplained fetal loss.
We did not find HBoV DNA in any of the deceased fetuses. Almost all pregnant women were HBoV-IgG positive.
PubMed ID
20031484 View in PubMed
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Accelerated decline in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rate during the screen and treat project in Vammala, Finland, as demonstrated in 29- to 45-year-old pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181548
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Leena Rehnberg-Laiho
Anniina Salomaa
Hilpi Rautelin
Pentti Koskela
Seppo Sarna
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The potential preventability of serious helicobacter-associated diseases - especially gastric cancer - has evoked interest in eradicating this pathogen from the population. We assessed the efficacy of the pioneering screen and treat intervention project in Vammala by studying helicobacter seroprevalence in pregnant women representing the normal population. Consecutive maternity clinic samples from native Finnish females at five different localities in 1995 (n=701) and 2000 (n=772) were investigated for class IgG H. pylori antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (Pyloriset EIA-G III, Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland). In Vammala the change in helicobacter seroprevalence was -13%-units (between 1995 and 2000; p=0.0125, chi-square test) in > or =29-year-old females, +1.6%-units (difference statistically non-significant) in
PubMed ID
14961972 View in PubMed
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Adult major affective disorder after prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208905
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
R A Machón
S A Mednick
M O Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Brain - embryology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Embryonic and Fetal Development - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We have previously reported an increase in schizophrenia diagnoses in a population exposed during the second trimester to the 1957 influenza epidemic. These basic findings together with a fair number of replications have been interpreted as supporting a neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of schizophrenia. Recent neuroimaging findings suggest that affective illness may also have a neurodevelopmental origin. We examined the hypothesis that exposure to an influenza epidemic during the second trimester would increase the risk for adult major affective disorder.
The subjects had been exposed as fetuses to the type A2/Singapore influenza epidemic in greater Helsinki, Finland. Control subjects were born in the 6 years before the epidemic.
We found a significant (P .05) were similar. The second-trimester effect remained when we estimated population-based rates (2.1 vs 0.6 per 1000) (P .05) elevation was observed for the bipolar forms of major affective disorder.
These data are consistent with the hypothesis concerning the possible neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of some forms of major affective disorder, especially unipolar depressive disorder. These encouraging findings, if replicated, may suggest that some mental disorders may stem, in part, from a disturbance in the development of the fetal brain during the second trimester.
PubMed ID
9107148 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes and Coxiella burnetii antibodies in pregnant women, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259464
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Stine Yde Nielsen
Kåre Mølbak
Tine Brink Henriksen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Carsten Schade Larsen
Steen Villumsen
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Coxiella burnetii - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
DNA, Bacterial - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Q Fever - complications - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Risk
Notes
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PubMed ID
24856281 View in PubMed
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Age-related decrease in prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis among pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65053
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1991 Jul-Sep;18(3):137
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of epidemiological peculiarities of rubella based on a mathematical model (according to observations over 10 years in Moscow).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242333
Source
J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1983;27(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
R A Kantorovich
L G Gol'dfarb
N I Volodina
A A Myskin
Source
J Hyg Epidemiol Microbiol Immunol. 1983;27(1):43-50
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Mathematics
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Moscow
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - immunology
Rubella - congenital - epidemiology - immunology
Rubella virus - immunology
Abstract
The main epidemiological values characterizing rubella in Moscow were calculated on the basis of a new mathematical model. Quantitative estimates of the intensity of infection in different age groups of the population were obtained. It has been established that the risk of infection in children is especially high in comparison with adult population. That is why 98% of the population aged 15 are immune. The probability of falling ill with rubella was determined for persons with different antibody levels. The cases of congenital rubella in Moscow are rare due to the low risk of infection in adults and to their immunity acquired in childhood. Consequently, there is no necessity for vaccination against rubella in Moscow at the present time, but it should be recommended to organize constant epidemiological surveillance of congenital rubella.
PubMed ID
6854012 View in PubMed
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An anonymous seroprevalence survey of HIV infection among pregnant women in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8317
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Dec 1;143(11):1187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1990
Author
M T Schechter
P J Ballem
N A Buskard
T N Le
M. Thompson
S A Marion
M V O'Shaughnessy
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Dec 1;143(11):1187-92
Date
Dec-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Specimen Collection
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
HIV Seroprevalence
HIV-1
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
We performed an anonymous seroprevalence survey of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection through HIV antibody testing of blood samples from 22,512 women aged 15 to 44 years receiving prenatal care in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory from Mar. 15 to Sept. 30, 1989. Of the samples six were confirmed to be HIV positive; this yielded a crude overall seroprevalence rate of 2.7 per 10,000 pregnant women (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0 to 5.8). All of the positive samples were from women 20 to 29 years of age; four were from Vancouver, one was from Victoria, and one was from elsewhere. The highest seroprevalence rates were among women aged 15 to 29 years in Vancouver and Victoria (7.2 and 9.4 per 10,000 pregnant women respectively). Thus, 1 in 1300 pregnant women in that age group in the metropolitan areas of British Columbia was HIV positive. Application of seroprevalence rates to the total female population in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory revealed that as many as 401 women had HIV infection in 1989. Our estimates likely represent the minimum. As a subset of women of childbearing age pregnant women are likely at lowest risk of HIV infection, and so the true number of women 15 to 44 years of age with HIV infection is probably several times higher. Our study has provided a baseline assessment and will be repeated annually to analyse trends in HIV seroprevalence among pregnant women in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Mar 15;144(6):627-81998908
PubMed ID
2224695 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of parvovirus B19 in a population of 3,596 pregnant women: a study of sociodemographic and medical risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32777
Source
BJOG. 2000 May;107(5):637-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
I P Jensen
P. Thorsen
B. Jeune
B R Møller
B F Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, States Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2000 May;107(5):637-43
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology
Parvovirus B19, Human - isolation & purification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the incidence of human parvovirus B19 among pregnant women before and during an epidemic, to elucidate possible sociodemographic and medical risk factors during pregnancy and to estimate the association between parvovirus B19 infection and negative pregnancy outcome. DESIGN: Prospective study among pregnant women followed from their first antenatal visit before 24 full weeks of gestation until delivery. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, November 1992 to February 1994. METHODS: 3,596 pregnant women were invited to participate. The women were examined at first antenatal visit in the period from November 1992 to February 1994 and at delivery. The last delivery was in August 1994 and samples were thus collected before and during a large parvovirus B19 epidemic in Denmark January to September 1994. A blood sample for parvovirus B19 serology was taken at enrollment and from the umbilical cord at delivery. Three questionnaires were completed during 2nd and 3rd trimesters and a registration form at delivery. In total, 3,174 (87.6%) were enrolled and 79.5% completed the study. RESULTS: The prevalence of B19 IgG seropositivity at the first antenatal visit before 24 full weeks of gestation was 66% . The cumulative prevalence proportion of acute parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy among IgG negative women was found to be 10.3% (IgM seropositivity and/or IgG seroconversion). The IgG seroconversion incidence increased significantly from 1.0% to 13.5% among 932 seronegative pregnant women before and during the epidemic, respectively (P
PubMed ID
10826579 View in PubMed
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An exploratory analysis of risk factors for childhood malignant germ-cell tumors: report from the Childrens Cancer Group (Canada, United States).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215290
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1995 May;6(3):187-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
X O Shu
M E Nesbit
J D Buckley
M D Krailo
L L Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1995 May;6(3):187-98
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Breast Feeding
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Germinoma - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
A study of 105 patients with childhood malignant germ-cell tumors (MGCT) and 639 community controls was conducted utilizing a large epidemiologic database collected by the Childrens Cancer Group from 25 member institutions in the United States and Canada. This study was designed to explore the risk factors of this malignancy whose etiology remains poorly understood. A structured, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect exposure information, and data were analyzed using an unconditional logistic regression model with adjustment for relevant confounders. Consistent with the findings from studies of adult MGCT, gestational age was associated inversely with risk of MGCT, with a 70 to 75 percent reduction in risk for children born at term compared with those born pre-term. Parental, particularly maternal, self-reported exposure to chemicals or solvents (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-11.3) and OR = 2.2, CI = 1.1-4.7 for maternal and paternal exposure, respectively) and plastic or resin fumes (OR = 12.0, CI = 1.9-75.0 [maternal] and OR = 2.5, CI = 1.0-6.5 [paternal]) were associated with elevated risk of MGCT. New findings, not reported previously, include a positive relationship of MGCT risk with birthweight and prolonged breastfeeding, an inverse association between MGCT risk and number of cigarettes smoked by the mother during pregnancy, and a 3.1-fold increased risk (CI = 1.5-6.6) associated with maternal urinary infections during index pregnancy. Although these findings need confirmation from future studies, they suggest a potential influence of in utero exposure to maternal endogenous hormones, parental environmental exposures, and maternal diseases during pregnancy in the development of childhood MGCT.
PubMed ID
7612798 View in PubMed
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245 records – page 1 of 25.