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Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical activity before and during pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63107
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Marie Lof
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoping, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running - physiology
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Human pregnancy is associated with increased requirements for dietary energy and this increase may be partly offset by reductions in physical activity during gestation. Studies in well-nourished women have shown that the physical activity level (PAL), obtained as the total energy expenditure (TEE) divided by the BMR, decreases in late pregnancy. However, it is not known if this decrease is really caused by reductions in physical activity or if it is the result of decreases in energy expenditure/BMR (the so-called metabolic equivalent, MET) for many activities in late pregnancy. In the present study activity pattern, TEE and BMR were assessed in twenty-three healthy Swedish women before pregnancy as well as in gestational weeks 14 and 32. Activity pattern was assessed using a questionnaire and heart rate recording. TEE was assessed using the doubly labelled water method and BMR was measured by means of indirect calorimetry. When compared to the pre-pregnant value, there was little change in the PAL in gestational week 14 but it was significantly reduced in gestational week 32. Results obtained by means of the questionnaire and by heart rate recording showed that the activity pattern was largely unaffected by pregnancy. The findings support the following conclusion: in a population of well-nourished women where the activity pattern is maintained during pregnancy, the increase in BMR represents approximately the main part of the pregnancy-induced increase in TEE, at least until gestational week 32.
PubMed ID
16469145 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption patterns among pregnant women in the Moscow region of the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167939
Source
Alcohol. 2006 Apr;38(3):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Christina D Chambers
Lela Kavteladze
Loudmila Joutchenko
Ludmila N Bakhireva
Kenneth Lyons Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. chchambers@ucsd.edu
Source
Alcohol. 2006 Apr;38(3):133-7
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Moscow - epidemiology
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Street Drugs
Abstract
Data regarding the prevalence and patterns of alcohol consumption among pregnant women in the Russian Federation is lacking. As part of a longitudinal pregnancy outcome study being conducted in the Moscow Region of Russia, in the 5-month period from January through May 2005, pregnant women in four prenatal care facilities were screened for self-reported alcohol consumption in the month around the time of conception and in the most recent month of pregnancy. Among the 413 respondents, 347 (85.0%) reported some alcohol consumption during one of the two time periods, and 193 (51.9%) of these drinking women reported some alcohol use in the most recent month. Of particular concern was the pattern of drinking, with 75 (20.2%) of drinking women reporting at least one episode of five or more drinks around the time of conception, and 153 (41.1%) of drinking women reporting at least one episode of three or four drinks during that same time period. Furthermore, this same pattern of heavier episodic drinking was reported by 18 (4.8%) and 39 (10.5%) of drinking women, respectively, in the most recent month in pregnancy before the screening interview. These data indicate that pregnant women in these areas of the Moscow Region present an important opportunity for education and intervention for alcohol-related birth outcomes.
PubMed ID
16905438 View in PubMed
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Associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy and breastfeeding duration with attainment of developmental milestones in early childhood: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92117
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Oken Emily
Østerdal Marie Louise
Gillman Matthew W
Knudsen Vibeke K
Halldorsson Thorhallur I
Strøm Marin
Bellinger David C
Hadders-Algra Mijna
Michaelsen Kim Fleischer
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, MA 02215, USA. emily_oken@0040hphc.org
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Sep;88(3):789-96
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Proteins
Female
Fishes
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mothers
Pregnancy - physiology
Prenatal Care
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the overall effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on child development or examined whether the developmental benefits of maternal fish intake are greater in infants breastfed for a shorter duration. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study associations of maternal prenatal fish intake and breastfeeding duration with child developmental milestones. DESIGN: We studied 25 446 children born to mothers participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort, a prospective population-based cohort study including pregnant women enrolled between 1997 and 2002. Mothers reported child development by a standardized interview, which we used to generate developmental scores at ages 6 and 18 mo. We used multivariate cumulative ordinal logistic regression to evaluate the odds of higher developmental scores associated with maternal fish intake and breastfeeding, after adjustment for child age, sex, and growth; maternal size and pregnancy characteristics; and parental education and social status. RESULTS: Higher maternal fish intake and greater duration of breastfeeding were associated with higher child developmental scores at 18 mo [odds ratio: 1.29 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.38) for the highest versus the lowest quintile of fish intake, and 1.28 (1.18, 1.38) for breastfeeding for > or =10 mo compared with breastfeeding for
PubMed ID
18779297 View in PubMed
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[A woman's weight before and during pregnancy is of importance to her infant. USA guidelines would benefit public health in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30568
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2003
Author
Elisabet Forsum
Karin Boström
Britt Eriksson
Sabina Olin-Skoglund
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för nutrition, institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Linköpings universitet. EliFo@ibk.liu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Date
Nov-27-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
English Abstract
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
United States
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
This paper describes weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden in relation to guidelines from the United States. These guidelines take into consideration the fact that optimal weight gain during pregnancy is related to the woman's prepregnant weight in relation to her height. Almost 50 per cent of women delivering babies in Sweden during the year 2000 were obese or overweight. In the three populations studied, less than 50 per cent gained weight in accordance with the US guidelines, while more than 20 per cent gained less weight than recommended. The results indicate that, in Sweden, more attention should be paid to the body weight of women who bear children.
PubMed ID
14717089 View in PubMed
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Birthweights in the Faroe Islands: possible role of isovaleric acid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65339
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Feb;225(2):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
R G Ackman
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute of Fisheries Technology, Technical University of Nova Scotia, Halifax.
Source
J Intern Med. 1989 Feb;225(2):73-5
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Denmark
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Pentanoic Acids - administration & dosage
Pregnancy - physiology
Valerates - administration & dosage
Abstract
A high intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been suggested as a factor in prolonged gestation in the population of the Faroe Islands. It is now suggested that isovaleric acid from pilot whales, a species frequently consumed in the Faroe Islands, may be the unusual dietary factor. Fatty acid data for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) in blood lipids of Faroese and Norwegians is reviewed in terms of the type of fish eaten, apparently mostly lean white fish with DHA much greater than EPA. The popular lean fish, thus, probably provides too little EPA to produce a marked effect on human biochemistry.
PubMed ID
2646392 View in PubMed
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Body Composition During Pregnancy: Longitudinal Changes and Method Comparisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307140
Source
Reprod Sci. 2020 07; 27(7):1477-1489
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Marja Bosaeus
Ulrika Andersson-Hall
Louise Andersson
Therese Karlsson
Lars Ellegård
Agneta Holmäng
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Reprod Sci. 2020 07; 27(7):1477-1489
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adipose Tissue - physiology
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Impedance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status - physiology
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Pregnancy Obesity Nutrition and Child Health study is a longitudinal study of reproductive health. Here we analyzed body composition of normal-weight and obese Swedish women by three methods during each trimester of pregnancy. Cross-sectional and longitudinal fat mass estimates using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) (Tanita MC-180MA-III) were compared with fat mass determined by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) in pregnancy weeks 8-12, 24-26, and 35-37 in normal-weight women (n =?122, BMI?=?22.1?±?1.6 kg/m2) and obese women (n =?29, BMI?=?34.6?±?3.6 kg/m2). ADP results were calculated from pregnancy-adjusted fat-free mass densities. Mean fat mass by QMR and ADP were similar in obese women, although with wide limits of agreement. In normal-weight women, QMR overestimated mean fat mass in all trimesters, with systematic overestimation at low fat mass values in trimesters 1 and 3. In obese women, fat mass by BIA was grossly underestimated and imprecise in all trimesters, especially at higher values in trimester 2. In normal-weight women, fat mass by BIA was moderately lower than by ADP in trimester 1, similar in trimester 2, and moderately higher in trimester 3. QMR and ADP assessed fat mass changes similarly in obese women, whereas BIA overestimated fat mass changes in normal-weight women. Mean fat mass and fat mass changes by QMR and pregnancy-adjusted ADP were similar in pregnant obese women. Mean fat mass by QMR and fat mass changes by BIA were higher than corresponding values determined by pregnancy-adjusted ADP in normal-weight women.
PubMed ID
31993997 View in PubMed
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Body fat, insulin resistance, energy expenditure and serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and resistin before, during and after pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148956
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Britt Eriksson
Marie Löf
Hanna Olausson
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jan;103(1):50-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - physiology
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Body Weight
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Leptin - blood
Pregnancy - physiology
Reference Values
Resistin - blood
Sweden
Abstract
Healthy human pregnancy is associated with changes in food intake, body fatness, energy expenditure and insulin resistance. However, available knowledge is limited regarding the physiological basis of these changes. Published evidence suggests that so-called adipokines (i.e. leptin, adiponectin and resistin) have significant roles when such changes are established. We explored, throughout a complete pregnancy, relationships between total body fat (TBF), energy expenditure, insulin resistance (homeostasic model of insulin resistance, HOMA-IR) and serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and resistin. Such concentrations were assessed before pregnancy in gestational weeks 8, 14, 20, 32 and 35, and 2 weeks postpartum in twenty-three healthy women. TBF, BMR (n 23) and HOMA-IR (n 17) were assessed before pregnancy in gestational weeks 14 and 32 and 2 weeks postpartum. TBF (%) was correlated with HOMA-IR (r 0.68-0.79, P
PubMed ID
19703326 View in PubMed
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Cesarean section rate in uncomplicated pregnancy as an indicator of healthcare quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100588
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Dec;89(12):1608-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010

Cessation of smoking during pregnancy improves foetal growth and reduces infant morbidity in the neonatal period. A population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36371
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1993 Feb;82(2):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
G. Ahlsten
S. Cnattingius
G. Lindmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1993 Feb;82(2):177-81
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy - physiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
All pregnant women in Uppsala county in 1987 were questioned on three different occasions about smoking habits, socio-demographic factors and obstetric history. After delivery, information was collected regarding their children. Twenty percent of the mothers continued to smoke during pregnancy, while 8% stopped smoking. The mean birth weight of infants of smokers was 3378 g and of non-smokers 3589 g. The difference was significant (p
PubMed ID
8477164 View in PubMed
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Changes in maternal characteristics in Nova Scotia, Canada from 1988 to 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174632
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):234-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Deshayne B Fell
K S Joseph
Linda Dodds
Alexander C Allen
Krista Jangaard
Michiel Van den Hof
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Deshayne.Fell@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):234-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Databases, Factual
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Maternal Age
Maternal Welfare - statistics & numerical data - trends
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnant Women - psychology
Smoking - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Maternal characteristics such as age, parity, smoking status, pre-pregnancy weight and pregnancy weight gain have changed in many industrialized countries in recent years. Many of these changes have not been adequately described at a population level. The purpose of this study was to describe recent trends in selected maternal characteristics in Nova Scotia.
Data from a population-based perinatal database were used to examine changes in maternal age, parity, smoking, pre-pregnancy weight, delivery weight and pregnancy weight gain among all deliveries between 1988 and 2001.
The proportion of deliveries to women > or = 35 years increased by 84% over the study period from 7.0% in 1988-1991 to 12.9% in 1998-2000, while deliveries to women > or = 40 years increased by more than 100%. The number of nulliparous women > or = 35 years also increased significantly. The overall prevalence of smoking decreased from 32.7% in 1988-1991 to 25.1% in 1998-2001, however the prevalence of smoking among women or = 90 kilograms (kg) increased by 165% from 4.1% in 1988-1991 to 10.7% in 1998-2001. The proportion of women with pregnancy weight gain of or =18 kg increased by 37% and 13%, respectively.
Dramatic changes have occurred in several important maternal characteristics and there is evidence of ongoing change. Continuation of these trends is likely to impact on future obstetric practice and perinatal health.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96(4):258
PubMed ID
15913093 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 1 of 10.