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266 records – page 1 of 27.

[3, 4, or more. An epidemic of multiple pregnancies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65051
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jul 10;88(28-29):2435-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1991
Author
B S Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jul 10;88(28-29):2435-7
Date
Jul-10-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - physiology - psychology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
1857168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated immunosenescence in preindustrial twin mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178937
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-2004
Author
Samuli Helle
Virpi Lummaa
Jukka Jokela
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Turku, Finland. samuli.helle@utu.fi
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Aug 17;101(33):12391-6
Date
Aug-17-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industry - history
Infection - immunology - mortality
Longevity - immunology
Models, Immunological
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - immunology
Reproduction - immunology
Time Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - immunology - mortality
Abstract
Life-history theory predicts a tradeoff between reproductive effort and lifespan. It has been suggested that this tradeoff is a result of reproductive costs accelerating senescence of the immune system, leading to earlier death. Longevity costs of reproduction are suggested for some human populations, but whether high reproductive effort leads to impaired immune function is unknown. We examined how reproductive effort affected postreproductive survival and the probability of dying of an infectious disease in women born in preindustrial Finland between 1702 and 1859. We found that mothers delivering twins had reduced postreproductive survival after age 65. This effect arose because mothers of twins had a higher probability of succumbing to an infectious disease (mainly tuberculosis) than mothers delivering singletons. The risk among mothers of twins of dying of an infectious disease was further elevated if mothers had started reproducing early. In contrast, neither female postreproductive survival nor the risk of succumbing to an infectious disease was influenced by the total number of offspring produced. Our results provide evidence of a long-term survival cost of twinning in humans and indicate that the mechanism mediating this cost might have been accelerated immunosenescence.
Notes
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2000 Jan 22;267(1439):171-610687823
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Cites: Twin Res. 2003 Feb;6(1):55-6112626229
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PubMed ID
15295101 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute polyhydramnios in twin pregnancy. A retrospective study with special reference to therapeutic amniocentesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59890
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Rådestad
P A Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - methods - standards
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Polyhydramnios - epidemiology - therapy - ultrasonography
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tocolysis
Twins, Monozygotic
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
Acute polyhydramnios in monozygotic twin pregnancy causes severe maternal discomfort and carries a high risk of premature labor. During the years 1980 to 1987, 36 patients with this complication were delivered in Sweden, giving an incidence of 1/20,000 births, or 1/200 twin births. In 18 patients (group A) who were treated with one or more amniotic taps, the delivery was postponed by 2 weeks, as compared with one week in 18 conservatively treated patients (group B). The peri- and neonatal death rate was 47% in group A and 58% in group B. Our own experience is that amniotic taps are safe if the amniotic fluid is removed slowly under prophylactic tocolysis. It gives symptomatic relief to the mother and may postpone labor until the gestational age of the twins is more compatible with survival.
PubMed ID
2244460 View in PubMed
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[A decrease in twin births and factors involved in multiple pregnancy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252336
Source
Genetika. 1975 Apr;11(4):150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1975
Author
N G Lipovetskaia
Iu A Iampol'skaia
Source
Genetika. 1975 Apr;11(4):150-7
Date
Apr-1975
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Menarche
Moscow
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Twins
Abstract
The object of this investigation were the causes of the decrease of the frequency of twin births during the last two decades. In Moscow this frequency decreased from 1,19% in 1956 to 0,7% in 1973. Among the births the proportion of first births was observed to increase, as well as the proportion of very young mothers. The effect of this process on the women characterized by a tendency to polyembryony was more conspicuous, than in the average on the population as a whole. During the last decades the process of acceleration of puberty was observed both in the mothers of twins and in all the women in general. However a somewhat later onset of first menstruations is characteristic of the women having a tendency to polyembryony-Hormonal changes taking place in the course of acceleration are apparently one of the causes of the decrease of the twin births frequency.
PubMed ID
1228064 View in PubMed
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Adverse maternal outcomes in multifetal pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177613
Source
BJOG. 2004 Nov;111(11):1294-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Mark C Walker
Kellie E Murphy
Saiyi Pan
Qiuying Yang
Shi Wu Wen
Author Affiliation
OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa General Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Box 241, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8LG.
Source
BJOG. 2004 Nov;111(11):1294-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Hematologic Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Maternal mortality
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In this retrospective cohort of 165,188 singleton pregnancies and 44,674 multiple-fetal pregnancies in Canada from 1984 to 2000, we compared the incidence of maternal complications. Multiple gestation pregnancies were associated with significant increases in cardiac morbidity, haematologic morbidity, amniotic fluid embolus, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, postpartum haemorrhage, prolonged hospital stay, the need for obstetric intervention, hysterectomy and blood transfusion. Multiple gestation pregnancies are associated with an increased risk of morbidity for the mother. This should be taken into consideration in antenatal care of these women.
PubMed ID
15521878 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1981 Dec;24(4):1007-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
M S Verp
A B Gerbie
Source
Clin Obstet Gynecol. 1981 Dec;24(4):1007-21
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - methods
Canada
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis
Great Britain
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System - immunology
Risk
Ultrasonography
United States
Abstract
Amniocentesis is a relatively safe and reliable procedure. However, there probably is a slightly increased risk of fetal loss following amniocentesis (approximately 0.5%). Other risks are minimal. Amniocentesis should be performed by obstetrician-gynecologists familiar with both the indications for the technique of second-trimester genetic amniocentesis. Recent social trends, including the increased availability of medical information to the lay public and the interest of many women in delaying childbearing, will increase public demand for antenatal diagnosis. It is important that obstetrician-gynecologists prepare to meet these demands.
PubMed ID
6800677 View in PubMed
Less detail

An association of chorionicity with preterm twin birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179694
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Debora Penava
Renato Natale
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Western Ontario, London ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Jun;26(6):571-4
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Chorion - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To assess the risk factors for preterm birth in twin pregnancies, particularly monochorionicity.
A cohort study of 767 sets of twins, each twin weighing more than 500 g, born between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001, at St. Joseph's Health Care in London, Ontario. Statistical analysis was performed using forward stepwise logistic regression models, with gestational age at birth less than 28 or 32 weeks as the outcome.
Polyhydramnios and chorioamnionitis were significant risk factors for preterm birth prior to 28 or 32 weeks' gestation. Monochorionicity was a risk factor for preterm birth prior to 32 weeks' gestation. Past term birth and maternal age over 30 years were associated with reduced risk for preterm birth.
Monochorionic placentation is a significant risk factor for preterm twin birth.
PubMed ID
15193202 View in PubMed
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[A new reporting system for better evaluation of fertilization in vitro]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64956
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 24;89(26-27):2348-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-1992
Author
M. Wikland
K G Nygren
Author Affiliation
Fertilitetscentrum, Carlanderska sjukhemmet, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 24;89(26-27):2348-9
Date
Jun-24-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Quality Control
Registries - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
1507943 View in PubMed
Less detail

An international collaborative study of the epidemiology of esophageal atresia or stenosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59462
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 1993 Sep-Oct;7(5):405-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Robert
O. Mutchinick
P. Mastroiacovo
L B Knudsen
A K Daltveit
E E Castilla
P. Lancaster
B. Källén
G. Cocchi
Author Affiliation
Institut Européen des Génomutations, Lyon, France.
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 1993 Sep-Oct;7(5):405-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Birth weight
Epidemiologic Factors
Esophageal Atresia - classification - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Registries
Survival Rate
World Health
Abstract
Epidemiologic data were analyzed for a total of 2,693 infants with esophageal atresia registered in nine congenital malformation registries around the world. The average recorded prevalence at birth was 2.6 per 10,000 births, with a significant variability among programs--and sometimes within a program--and a maximum prevalence of above 3 per 10,000 births. Clusters of infants with esophageal atresia were observed but may be random. An increasing rate was seen during the period 1965 to 1975 (Norway, South America, Sweden). The type of esophageal atresia was specified in only 439 cases, but no major differences were seen in the epidemiologic characteristics of infants with the most common type (distal fistula) and infants with other types. There was an excess of low birth weight and preterm birth, and infants with esophageal atresia had a birth weight 500 to 1,000 g less than normal infants in each gestational week. There was an excess of twins, apparently mainly or exclusively due to monozygotic twinning, but in only two pairs did both twins have esophageal atresia. There was no effect seen of maternal age, but low parity, irrespective of maternal age, was associated with an increased risk for esophageal atresia. Infant survival varied among programs and depended heavily on associated malformations. Among 1,107 sibs born before the proband and 385 born after the proband, only 25 (1.7%) had a serious malformation; three had esophageal atresia. In 57.3% of the infants with esophageal atresia, no other malformations were present, in 36.4% other major malformations were recorded, and in 6.3% there were chromosomal anomalies. The malformations present associated with esophageal atresia were analyzed: a large proportion entered the constellation sometimes called "caudal mesoderm spectrum of malformations": VATER, Potter, and caudal regression sequences.
PubMed ID
8274816 View in PubMed
Less detail

An IVF fallacy: multiple pregnancy risk is lower for older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208873
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 1997 Apr;14(4):192-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
S. Senöz
A. Ben-Chetrit
R F Casper
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 1997 Apr;14(4):192-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Chorionic Gonadotropin - administration & dosage
Embryo Implantation
Embryo Transfer
Endometrium - metabolism
Female
Fertilization
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Maternal Age
Menotropins - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Rate
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Multiple pregnancy is one of the most important and preventable complications of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer. The general clinical practice in many IVF clinics is to transfer four or five embryos to older women if available, since pregnancy rates are lower in women older than 35 years of age. However, it is not clear whether the risk for multiple pregnancy is also lower.
Our objective was to investigate whether transferring a higher number of embryos actually improves pregnancy outcome in older women, without increasing the risk for multiple pregnancy and to investigate other factors that may affect the occurrence of multiple pregnancy.
The setting was university-based IVF program at The Toronto Hospital.
The design was a retrospective case series.
The outcome of 1116 IVF cycles between January 1992 and December 1993 was investigated according to different age groups.
The main outcome measure was multiple pregnancies.
Seventy multiple pregnancies resulted from a total of 242 pregnancies. Overall pregnancy and multiple pregnancy rates were inversely correlated with age. However, when the data were adjusted for the number of embryos transferred, this trend disappeared. The result of multiple regression analysis showed that the multiple pregnancy rate was higher without improving the pregnancy rate when the number of embryos transferred exceeded three, regardless of the age of the patients, especially when more embryos were available than the number of transferred ones.
The number of embryos transferred should be limited to a maximum of three regardless of the age of patients, to reduce the high frequency of multiple gestations in an IVF program.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9130066 View in PubMed
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266 records – page 1 of 27.