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The accident at Chernobyl and trisomy 21 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36798
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
T. Harjulehto-Mervaala
R. Salonen
T. Aro
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Matched-Pair Analysis
Maternal Age
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Trisomy
Ukraine
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether the radiation fallout in Finland after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 led to an increased incidence of trisomy 21. In this geographic and temporal cohort study, the country was divided into three zones according to the amounts of radioactive fallout and internal radiation caused by two cesium isotopes. The 518 cytologically verified cases of trisomy 21 were divided into a control group (conceived before the accident), and a study group of children whose expected dates of birth were in the post-accident years 1987-1988, i.e., pregnancies commenced after May 1986. The cases were also divided into three subgroups according to the zones of radiation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of trisomy 21 between the control and study groups nor between the three zones in spite of the significant differences in the levels of radiation and in the body burden that prevailed throughout the study period. Power estimates showed that in the two zones of lower radiation, an increase of 0.5% in the prevalence would have been detected with a power of 0.85, and in the somewhat smaller zone of the highest radiation, with a power of 0.70. The study lends no further support to the view that the low radiation fallout in western Europe would have been causally associated with trisomy 21.
PubMed ID
1379341 View in PubMed
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Acta sixty years ago. On abortions in Oslo, fistulas in Helsinki, elderly primiparas in Stockholm, and more.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65123
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1991;70(2):101-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Advanced maternal age and adverse perinatal outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47166
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):727-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Bo Jacobsson
Lars Ladfors
Ian Milsom
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Centre, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, S-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. bo.jacobsson@obgyn.gu.se
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):727-33
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of maternal age on perinatal and obstetric outcome in women aged 40-44 years and those 45 years or older and to estimate whether adverse outcome was related to intercurrent illness and pregnancy complications. METHODS: National prospective, population-based, cohort study in women aged 40-44 years and those 45 years or older and in a control group of women aged 20-29 years who delivered during the period 1987-2001. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated after adjustments for significant malformations, maternal pre-existing diseases, and smoking. Main outcome measures were perinatal mortality, intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, preterm birth, and preeclampsia. RESULTS: During the 15-year period, there were 1,566,313 deliveries (876,361 women were 20-29 years of age, 31,662 were 40-44 years, and 1,205 were > or = 45 years). Perinatal mortality was 1.4%, 1.0%, and 0.5% in women 45 years or older, 40-44, and 20-29 years, respectively. Adjusted OR for perinatal mortality was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-4.0) in women aged 45 years or older, compared with 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9) in women 40-44 years. Adjusted OR for intrauterine fetal death was 3.8 (95% CI 2.2-6.4) in women aged 45 years or older, compared with 2.1 (95% CI 1.8-2.4) in women 40-44 years. Preterm birth, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia were more common among women 40-44 years of age and those 45 years or older. Perinatal mortality was increased in women with intercurrent illness or pregnancy complications compared with women without these conditions, but there was no evidence that these factors became more important with increasing age. CONCLUSION: Perinatal mortality, intrauterine fetal death, and neonatal death increased with age. There was also an increase in intercurrent illnesses and pregnancy complications with increasing age, but this did not entirely explain the observed increase in perinatal mortality with age. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II-3
PubMed ID
15458893 View in PubMed
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Advanced maternal age: are decisions about the timing of child-bearing a failure to understand the risks?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159336
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jan 15;178(2):183-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2008
Author
Karen M Benzies
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. benzies@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jan 15;178(2):183-4
Date
Jan-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Decision Making
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prevalence
Reproductive Behavior
Risk assessment
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Time Factors
Notes
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):67-7211856456
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Jan 15;178(2):165-7218195290
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Mar;109(3):399-40311875131
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):727-3315458893
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jun;105(6):1410-815932837
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Dec;193(6):1923-3516325593
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Mar;194(3):840-516522422
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2006 May;85(5):1420-416616749
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Sep-Oct;35(5):625-3316958718
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):330-416967756
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Oct;60(10):851-316973530
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2006 Sep;28(9):780-817022918
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2007 Mar;11(2):189-9817237994
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Jul;34(7 Suppl):S11-2117592385
Comment On: CMAJ. 2008 Jan 15;178(2):165-7218195290
PubMed ID
18195294 View in PubMed
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Age at last full-term pregnancy and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24153
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2-1993
Author
A. Kalache
A. Maguire
S G Thompson
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion Sciences Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):33-6
Date
Jan-2-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brazil
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Age at first full-term pregnancy (FTP) has long been thought to be the major reproductive risk factor in breast cancer but a Norwegian study suggested that age at last FTP might be more important. In Norway "high parity" means 4 or more deliveries. Does this finding hold in an area with a much broader distribution of parity? Data from a case-control study done in 1980-82 in Fortaleza and Recife, two cities in Brazil's impoverished north-east, have been used to explore further the influence of age at last FTP. The cases were 509 women with histologically diagnosed breast cancer who were matched with hospital controls for age and area of residence. The analysis was based on case-control pairs interviewed by the same person. High breast cancer risk was associated with low parity; after adjustment for parity, breast cancer risk was related both to late age at first FTP (odds ratio [OR] 1.21 for each 5 year increase, p = 0.008) and to late age at last FTP (OR 1.24, p = 0.0007). However, multivariate analysis revealed that the effect of age at last FTP dominated that of age at first FTP: once age at last FTP was taken into account the effect of age at first FTP was no longer significant (OR 1.08, p = 0.38) while the association with parity became more striking. These results challenge the view that age at first FTP is the principal reproductive variable related to breast cancer risk. Moreover, they suggest that high parity is protective independent of ages at first and last FTP. Given recent worldwide reductions in fertility rates, breast cancer incidence may be expected to increase. Balancing that may be the willingness of some women to complete their families by, say, age 35 if they were to be told that this might reduce their risk of breast cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1993 Feb 20;341(8843):502-38094531
Comment In: Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):24-58093271
PubMed ID
8093279 View in PubMed
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[Amniocentesis and chorionic villi biopsy. A 10-year material]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63771
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 27;163(35):4750-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-2001
Author
K V Ejskjaer
A U Sørensen
P L Johannesen
J. Praest
Author Affiliation
Randers Centralsygehus, gynaekologisk obstetrisk afdeling. k.ejskjaer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 27;163(35):4750-3
Date
Aug-27-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Adult
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Chorionic Villi Sampling - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - pathology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prenatal diagnosis at a secondary referral hospital. METHOD: A retrospective study was carried out on 1752 women examined by amniocentesis (AC) (n = 1037) or chorion villus sampling (CVS) (n = 715) at Randers Centralsygehus from 1 April 1987 to 31 December 1996. RESULTS: A cytogenetic diagnosis was made in 99.8% of the AC group and 99.4% of the CVS group. Complications, recorded as either spontaneous abortion, bleeding/threatening abortion, pain/contractions or amniotic fluid leakage, were seen in 1.9%, 3.3%, 2.9%, and 2.3% after AC and 1.8%, 7.3%, 3.4%, and 0% after CVS. There were significantly more re-examinations after CVS when the procedure was carried out by less experienced operators (p
PubMed ID
11572051 View in PubMed
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Analysis of malpractice claims with a focus on oxytocin use in labour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78439
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):315-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Jonsson Maria
Nordén Solveig Lindeberg
Hanson Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. maria.jonsson@akademiska.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(3):315-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Distress - epidemiology
Fetal Monitoring
Humans
Hypoxia, Brain - epidemiology
Labor, Obstetric
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Oxytocics - adverse effects
Oxytocin - adverse effects
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to analyse the motives behind disciplinary action in obstetric malpractice cases concerning delivery, and to evaluate the frequency of inappropriate oxytocin use in these cases. METHODS: An analysis of all malpractice claims resulting in disciplinary action against physicians and midwives during the period 1996-2003. Investigations and decisions made by the Board of Medical Responsibility were reviewed with special focus on the use of oxytocin. RESULTS: Of 77 cases, 60 regarded patients in labour. In the majority, there had been a normal pregnancy and spontaneous start of labour (78%). At the beginning of labour, 87% showed a normal fetal heart rate (FHR) pattern, indicating fetal well-being. In 70%, there was adverse fetal outcome with brain damage or death. The most common reason for disciplinary action was improper interpretation of fetal monitor tracings and corresponding failure to recognise fetal distress (76%). Injudicious use of oxytocin was common (68.5%), and was the primary reason for disciplinary action in 33% of the cases. CONCLUSION: In a Swedish setting, a few common clinical problems pervade; interpretation of FHR patterns and the use of oxytocin account for the majority of rulings of negligence in malpractice cases regarding delivery. Analysis of the cases suggests that the adverse fetal outcomes could possibly have been prevented.
PubMed ID
17364306 View in PubMed
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Androgen levels in pregnant women decrease with increasing maternal age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52146
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S M Carlsen
G. Jacobsen
K S Bjerve
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, St. Olav's Hospital. University Hospital of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(1):23-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - physiology
Androgens - blood
Androstenedione - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - blood
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate a possible effect of age on maternal androgen levels in uncomplicated pregnancies. METHODS: A study of 134 parous women with uncomplicated pregnancies was carried out at three university hospitals in Norway and Sweden. Maternal levels of androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, testosterone and the free testosterone index were measured during weeks 17 and 33 of pregnancy. RESULTS: Maternal levels of androstenedione and testosterone had a negative association with maternal age in weeks 17 and 33 of pregnancy, while dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and the free testosterone index were associated negatively in week 33 only. Adjustment for maternal parity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking and fetal gender did not affect the results. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal androgen levels decrease with increasing maternal age. The cause and possible implication of this finding remain unknown.
PubMed ID
12729066 View in PubMed
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Antepartum risk score predicts adverse birth outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144409
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jan;32(1):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Igor Burstyn
Author Affiliation
Community and Occupational Medicine Program, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Jan;32(1):16-20
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Apgar score
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Premature Birth
Resuscitation
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
Standardized risk assessment plays an important role in providing medical care of uniform quality to pregnant women, even though it is not a substitute for clinical judgement. This study was designed to determine whether the antepartum risk score currently used across Alberta is associated with neonatal morbidity and adverse pregnancy outcomes for singleton live births and to examine whether the current classification of "lower risk" pregnancies (score
PubMed ID
20370976 View in PubMed
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Aspects of early amniocentesis. A cytogenetic and clinical evaluation of the filter technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63530
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2003 Mar;50(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Karin Sundberg
Author Affiliation
Chromosome Laboratory, Section of Clinical Genetics, Ultrasound Clinic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2003 Mar;50(1):1-14
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis - instrumentation - methods
Chorionic Villi Sampling
Chromosome Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control
Cytogenetic Analysis - instrumentation - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Micropore Filters
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Time Factors
PubMed ID
12705142 View in PubMed
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173 records – page 1 of 18.