Skip header and navigation

Refine By

15 records – page 1 of 2.

Air pollution and daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Windsor, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176397
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen Y Fung
Isaac Luginaah
Kevin M Gorey
Greg Webster
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4. kfung@uwindsor.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):29-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Risk
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Weather
Abstract
To examine the role that ambient air pollution plays in exacerbating cardiovascular disease hospitalization in Windsor, Ontario.
The number of daily cardiac hospital admissions was obtained from all Windsor hospitals from April 1, 1995 to December 31, 2000 and linked to concentrations of ambient air pollutants and weather variables. The logarithm of daily counts of hospitalization was regressed on the levels of pollutants, after adjusting for seasonal, weekly cycles, and weather variables using time series analysis with natural splines as smoothing functions.
Of all the pollutants considered, sulphur dioxide (SO2) had the strongest effect on cardiac hospitalization among the > or = 65 age group. The percentage increase in daily admission was 2.6% for current day sulphur dioxide level (95% CI: 0.5-6.4), 4.0% for 2-day mean level (95% CI: 0.1-6.9), and 5.6% (95% CI: 1.5-9.9) for 3-day mean level for an increase in interquartile range of 19.3 ppb. When particulate PM10 was included in the model, the contributing effect of sulphur dioxide remained significant for the > or = 65 age group for all three levels.
Short-term effects of sulphur dioxide are associated significantly to daily cardiac hospital admissions for people > or = 65 years of age living in Windsor. Since Windsor is a border city, additional monitoring and assessment is recommended to determine if air quality and resultant health effects have deteriorated since traffic congestion at the border has increased following the events of September 11, 2001.
Notes
Cites: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2000 Jul;50(7):1199-20610939212
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2001 Apr;17(4):604-811401052
Cites: Circulation. 2001 Jun 12;103(23):2810-511401937
Cites: Epidemiology. 2001 Jul;12(4):413-911416779
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Aug;109 Suppl 4:523-711544157
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Dec;109 Suppl 6:827-4311744501
Cites: Epidemiology. 2003 Jan;14(1):18-2312500041
Cites: Environ Res. 2003 Jan;91(1):8-2012550083
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Apr;24(8):752-6012713769
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 15;157(12):1055-6512796040
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jan 6;109(1):71-714676145
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Jan 21;345(8943):176-87741860
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jul 1;142(1):15-227785669
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jul 1;142(1):23-357785670
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1995 Oct;85(10):1361-57573618
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Sep;86(9):1273-808806380
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Jul;8(4):371-79209849
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Mar;8(2):162-79229208
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1997 Aug;54(8):535-409326156
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Oct;106(10):649-539755140
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health A. 1998 Oct 9;55(3):185-969772102
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Jan;10(1):17-229888275
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 Mar-Apr;54(2):130-910094292
PubMed ID
15682690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders in structured diagnostic interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164012
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary (AB) Canada T2N 4N1. patten@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):462-6
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Episode of Care
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Panic Disorder - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Syndrome
Abstract
Structured diagnostic inter- views include items that evaluate physical etiologies for mood and anxiety disorders. The objective of this article was to assess the impact of such items.
A mental health survey in Canada collected data from n = 36,984 household residents. The lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders was calculated with and without exclusions due to physical causes.
Approximately 10% of subjects with a lifetime depressive disorder reported that all of their episodes were due to one or more physical cause. Many of the reported etiologies were implausible given the DSM-IV requirement that the disturbance be a "direct physiological consequence" of the physical cause. The results were similar for manic episodes and anxiety disorders.
Structured diagnostic interviews assess physical etiologies in ways that are subject to inconsistency and inaccuracy. Physical etiology items may bias estimates by introducing etiological opinions into the assessment of disorder frequency.
PubMed ID
17450450 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cigarette smoking and the risk of anogenital cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224507
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jan 15;135(2):180-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1992
Author
J R Daling
K J Sherman
T G Hislop
C. Maden
M T Mandelson
A M Beckmann
N S Weiss
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98104.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jan 15;135(2):180-9
Date
Jan-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Penile Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Precipitating Factors
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between cigarette smoking and cervical cancer has been demonstrated in numerous prior studies. As part of population-based case-control studies of cancers of the vulva, vagina, cervix, anus, and penis in relation to infection with human papillomavirus, conducted in western Washington State and the province of British Columbia from the mid 1980s until the present time, the authors have collected detailed information on smoking history. The proportion of subjects who were current smokers of cigarettes ranged from slightly over 40% among incident cases of vaginal and cervical cancer to 60% among cases of vulvar and anal cancer. In contrast, only about 25% of controls were current smokers. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) associated with current smoking were substantially elevated (OR = 1.9-14.6) for all cancer sites except cancer of the vagina (OR = 1.3). The risks tended to increase in proportion to the number of cigarettes smoked. For most cancer sites, the odds ratios associated with former smoking were substantially less than those associated with current smoking and diminished with increasing time since cessation of smoking. The authors' data and those of other investigators suggest that cigarette smoking plays a role in the etiology of anogenital cancers and that smoking has a late-stage or promotional effect.
PubMed ID
1311142 View in PubMed
Less detail

The communicative aspect of nonfatal suicidal behavior--are there gender differences?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52168
Source
Crisis. 2002;23(4):144-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Heidi Hjelmeland
Birthe Loa Knizek
Hilmar Nordvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Heidi.Hjelmeland@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Crisis. 2002;23(4):144-55
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Communication
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Intention
Male
Norway
Precipitating Factors
Psychological Theory
Psychotherapy - methods
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
Data from the Norwegian part of the WHO/EURO Multicenter Study on Suicidal Behavior were used to investigate gender differences in the communicative aspect of nonfatal suicidal behavior by means of analyzing precipitating factors, intentions involved in and effects of the suicidal act within the frame of Qvortrup's interpretation of speech-act theory. Eighty-nine patients (48 women and 41 men) were included in the analyses, virtually no gender differences were found. Thus, in general, the results did not support the view that persons engaging in nonfatal suicidal behavior should receive different treatment or follow-up as a group based on their gender. The results gave some support to Qvortrup's speech-act theory and his four categories of suicidal behavior, emotional toward others, regulative toward others, emotional toward oneself and regulative toward oneself.
PubMed ID
12617478 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developmental precursors of psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30337
Source
Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2004 Jun;6(3):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Matti Isohanni
Irene Isohanni
Hannu Koponen
Johanna Koskinen
Pekka Laine
Erika Lauronen
Jouko Miettunen
Pirjo Mäki
Kaisa Riala
Sami Räsänen
Kaisa Saari
Pekka Tienari
Juha Veijola
Graham Murray
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu University Central Hospital, PO Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. matti.isohanni@oulu.fi
Source
Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2004 Jun;6(3):168-75
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Child Development
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - complications
Creativeness
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects
Educational Status
Family - psychology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Lipids - blood
Motor Skills
Precipitating Factors
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychotic Disorders - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Subtle developmental (motor, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral) abnormalities are often present in apparently healthy individuals who later develop psychosis, suggesting that some aspects of causation are established before overt psychosis. These impairments may restrict information processing and social achievements years before manifesting psychosis. The main known risk factors in the development of schizophrenic psychosis are genetic factors, pregnancy and delivery complications, slow neuromotor development, and deviant cognitive and academic performance. However, their effect size and predictive power are small. Developmental precursors are not necessarily specific to schizophrenia, but also common to other psychotic disorders. No powerful risk factor, premorbid sign, or risk indicator has been identified that is useful for prediction of psychoses in the general population.
PubMed ID
15142469 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do antidepressants precipitate youth suicide?: a nationwide pharmacoepidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82723
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;15(4):232-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Søndergård Lars
Kvist Kajsa
Andersen Per K
Kessing Lars V
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. l.s@rh.dk.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;15(4):232-40
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Precipitating Factors
Regression Analysis
Risk
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between treatment with Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and suicide in children and adolescents on the individual and ecological level were examined in a nationwide Danish pharmacoepidemiological register-linkage study including all persons aged 10-17 years treated with antidepressants during the period 1995-1999 (n=2,569) and a randomly selected control population (n=50,000). A tripartite approach was used. In Part 1, changes in youth suicide and use of antidepressants were examined. In Part 2, we made an assessment of youth suicide characteristics. In Part 3, we analysed the relative risk (RR) of suicide according to antidepressant treatment corrected for psychiatric hospital contact to minimize the problem of confounding by indication. The use of SSRIs among children and adolescents increased substantially during the study period, but the suicide rate remained stable (Part 1). Among 42 suicides nationally aged 10-17 years at death, none was treated with SSRIs within 2 weeks prior to suicide (Part 2). There was an increased rate of suicide associated with SSRIs (RR=4.47), however, not quite significant (95% CI: 0.95-20.96), when adjusted for severity of illness (Part 3). Conclusively, we were not able to identify an association between treatment with SSRIs and completed suicide among children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
16502208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Female urinary incontinence--consultation behaviour and patient experiences: an epidemiological survey in a Norwegian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73078
Source
Fam Pract. 1995 Mar;12(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
A. Seim
H. Sandvik
R. Hermstad
S. Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Fam Pract. 1995 Mar;12(1):18-21
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Precipitating Factors
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The objective was to study explanatory factors for help-seeking among incontinent women, and what was the outcome of the treatment. A questionnaire was mailed to all 2366 women aged 20 or over in the rural community of Rissa, Norway. Women confirming incontinence gave information about duration, precipitating factors, frequency, amount of leakage, and impact. Questions about doctor consultation or planned consultation, treatment and results were included. Women with incontinence which had resolved without treatment were also recorded. A total of 77% answered the questionnaire. Twenty per cent of women with incontinence (n = 535) had consulted a doctor, 18% had planned to consult. Increasing age and duration, and urge/mixed type of incontinence were determinative factors for doctor consultation, while increasing severity and impact were determinative for planned consultation. Drugs, exercises, pads, and electrostimulation were all important treatment options: 21% were cured, 40% much better after treatment. Of all the women, 8% reported that they had been incontinent in the past, and only 18% of these had consulted a doctor.
PubMed ID
7665034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living with cerebral palsy and tube feeding: A population-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200881
Source
J Pediatr. 1999 Sep;135(3):307-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
S W Smith
C. Camfield
P. Camfield
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University Medical School and IWK-Grace Health Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 1999 Sep;135(3):307-10
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cerebral Palsy - mortality - psychology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Planning
Enteral Nutrition - adverse effects - psychology
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrostomy - adverse effects - psychology
Humans
Infant
Jejunostomy - adverse effects - psychology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Precipitating Factors
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To assess the impact of surgically placed feeding tubes on children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) and their families and to determine the survival of these children after initiation of tube feeding (TF).
Virtually all children from Nova Scotia who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy procedures between the years 1980 and 1998 and who had been diagnosed with CP were identified. Caretakers of those children who had TF initiated in the last 8 years were evaluated by using a semi-structured interview. Names of children who had not had recent follow-up visits were submitted to the provincial Vital Statistics office to determine whether they had died. Data from patients who were tube-fed between 1980 and 1989 were then used in combination with data from the more recent cases to create a survival curve.
A total of 61 children were identified; 16 had died. Forty of 45 eligible families were interviewed; 90% were pleased with the effect of TF on their child and family life. Negative reports were associated with increased stress related to feeding. Survival rates after gastrostomy and/or jejunostomy were 83% after 2 years and 75% after 7 years.
In children with severe CF, initiation of TF improved the quality of life for both the child and family in 90% despite frequent minor complications.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2001 Jan;138(1):14711148533
Comment In: J Pediatr. 1999 Sep;135(3):272-310484786
PubMed ID
10484794 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mechanisms of acute myocardial infarction study (MAMIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47092
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 2004 Oct;58 Suppl 1:S111-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Ram B Singh
Daniel Pella
Nirankar S Neki
J P Chandel
Saurabh Rastogi
Heideki Mori
Kuniaki Otsuka
Pankaj Gupta
Author Affiliation
Medical Hospital and Research Center, Moradabad, India. icn2005@mickyonline.com
Source
Biomed Pharmacother. 2004 Oct;58 Suppl 1:S111-5
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activity Cycles
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Chronobiology Disorders - complications - physiopathology
Climate
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Eating - physiology
Electrocardiography
Exertion
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - complications - diagnosis
Neurosecretory Systems - chemistry - metabolism - physiopathology
Patient Selection
Precipitating Factors
Sex Factors
Sleep Deprivation - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Sympathetic Nervous System - metabolism - physiopathology
Abstract
Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a highly dynamic event, which is associated with marked neuroendocrinological dysfunction in addition to cardiac damage. The immediate trigger for AMI is not precisely known. Studies conducted by Lown, Braunwald, Halberg, Otsuka and our group have demonstrated a marked increase in sympathetic activity, oxidative stress, and magnesium and potassium deficiency during AMI. Clinical studies have reported an increased incidence of AMI, sudden death and ischemia during first quarter of the day when there is a rapid withdrawal of vagal activity and increase in sympathetic tone. In one case-control study of 202 patients with AMI, there was a significant (P
PubMed ID
15754848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Precipitating factors of delirium: stress response to multiple triggers among patients with and without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265609
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2014 Nov;59:42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
E H Hölttä
J V Laurila
M L Laakkonen
T E Strandberg
R S Tilvis
K H Pitkala
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2014 Nov;59:42-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Delirium - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Dementia - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Precipitating Factors
Prognosis
Stress, Physiological - physiology
Abstract
Delirium is common and serious acute syndrome among older people precipitated by multiple external factors such as acute illnesses, trauma, surgery, and drugs. The aim of this study was to find possible stressors and causative triggers for acute delirium and compare patients with or without dementia in this respect.
193 delirious patients from two separate delirium studies including settings of nursing homes and geriatric wards were thoroughly assessed for precipitating factors of delirium. Patients with and without dementia were compared for their clinical status, symptoms and signs, prognosis, and the profile of precipitating factors of delirium.
The patients with dementia (n=98) and without dementia (n=95) did not differ in their demographic factors, mean number of drugs, or their psychiatric symptoms. The patients with dementia had higher number of comorbidities, poorer cognition, and they were more often restrained than those without dementia. The mean number of precipitators for delirium was 2.6 among those without dementia and 2.0 among those with dementia (p=0.0019). Infections, metabolic conditions, trauma, and surgery were more common precipitating factors for delirium in those without than those with dementia. There was no difference in mortality between the groups.
Most patients had multiple precipitating factors for delirium irrespective of prior dementia. Those with dementia and decreased cognitive reserves needed lower number of etiologies to develop delirium. The profile of causative agents differed among patients with and without dementia.
PubMed ID
24809631 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.