Skip header and navigation

Refine By

183 records – page 1 of 19.

Actinic keratosis: a cross-sectional study of disease characteristics and treatment patterns in Danish dermatology clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279478
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Andrés M Erlendsson
Henrik Egekvist
Henrik F Lorentzen
Peter A Philipsen
Birgitte Stausbøl-Grøn
Ida M Stender
Merete Haedersdal
Source
Int J Dermatol. 2016 Mar;55(3):309-16
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminolevulinic Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Aminoquinolines - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cryotherapy - utilization
Denmark
Dermatology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Keratosis, Actinic - complications - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Photochemotherapy - utilization
Photosensitizing Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The incidence of actinic keratosis (AK) is increasing, and several treatment options are available. The aim of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in patients with AK treated by Danish dermatologists.
A multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional study was conducted. Three dermatology hospital departments and seven private dermatology clinics enrolled eligible AK patients consecutively during one week.
A total of 312 patients were included. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was previously reported in 51.0% of patients and currently suspected in 9.4% of AK-affected anatomical regions. Lesions of AK were located primarily on the face (38.6%), scalp (12.8%), and hands (11.2%). Actinic keratosis commonly presented with multiple AK lesions (38.6%) and field cancerization (38.5%). The treatments used most frequently were cryotherapy (57.7%) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolevulinate (17.1%) and imiquimod (11.2%). The likelihood of receiving cryotherapy was higher for men (odds ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-2.47) and increased with age (2.2% per year, 0.4-4.0%). PDT represented the most frequently applied treatment for severe actinic damage and was more likely to be prescribed to women (OR 4.08, 95% CI 2.22-7.47) and young patients (OR 0.97 per year, 95% CI 0.95-0.99). The prevalence of severe actinic damage (17.3% versus 9.6%) and intake of immunosuppressive medication (29.0 versus 2.0) were higher among hospital patients compared with those treated in private practices (P 
PubMed ID
26276415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to guidelines on antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections in various categories of physicians: a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271494
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Tell
Sven Engström
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how prescription patterns concerning respiratory tract infections differ between interns, residents, younger general practitioners (GPs), older GPs and locums.
Retrospective study of structured data from electronic patient records.
Data were obtained from 53 health centres and 3 out-of-hours units in Jönköping County, Sweden, through their common electronic medical record database.
All physicians working in primary care during the 2-year study period (1 November 2010 to 31 October 2012).
Physicians' adherence to current guidelines for respiratory tract infections regarding the use of antibiotics.
We found considerable differences in prescribing patterns between physician categories. The recommended antibiotic, phenoxymethylpenicillin, was more often prescribed by interns, residents and younger GPs, while older GPs and locums to a higher degree prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. The greatest differences were seen when the recommendation in guidelines was to refrain from antibiotics, as for acute bronchitis. Interns and residents most often followed guidelines, while compliance in descending order was: young GPs, older GPs and locums. We also noticed that male doctors were somewhat overall more restrictive with antibiotics than female doctors.
In general, primary care doctors followed national guidelines on choice of antibiotics when treating respiratory tract infections in children but to a lesser degree when treating adults. Refraining from antibiotics seems harder. Adherence to national guidelines could be improved, especially for acute bronchitis and pneumonia. This was especially true for older GPs and locums whose prescription patterns were distant from the prevailing guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-8211927025
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(5):366-7112069022
Cites: South Med J. 2001 Apr;94(4):365-911332898
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Jun;47:1217-2411421050
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2012 Apr;18(2):473-8421210896
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Dec;66 Suppl 6:vi3-1222096064
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(4):208-1519929185
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Nov;14(11):1722-3018976555
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Feb;8(2):125-3218222163
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Jan;77(1):50-717185030
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2006 Sep;56(530):680-516954000
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1982 Jul;15(1):111-77086372
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(2):139-4315061670
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2004 Jan;9(1):30-414762318
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2013 Apr 3-16;110(27-28):1282-423951882
PubMed ID
26179648 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age of diagnosing physician impacts the incidence of thyroid cancer in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271219
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1627-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sapna Nagar
Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy
Edwin L Kaplan
Peter Angelos
Raymon H Grogan
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1627-34
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biopsy, Fine-Needle
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Registries
SEER Program
Thyroid Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Thyroid ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) have been implicated in the overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer. To study how the use of diagnostic tools impacts thyroid cancer incidence, we propose using physician age as a surrogate. We aimed to determine whether thyroid cancer incidence is higher in areas with a high density of young physicians compared with areas with a high density of older physicians.
SEER 13 database was used to determine thyroid cancer incidence. These data were linked to the Area Resource File data (2000), containing information on physician age at a county-specific level. Cohorts were divided by age based on the concentration of physicians within a population of 1,000,000 persons. The study period was divided into two time periods (1992-1995, 2006-2009).
The incidence of thyroid cancer was stable in areas with high concentrations of young and older physicians during the 1992-1995 time period [
PubMed ID
25240802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analgesic prescribing patterns in Norwegian nursing homes from 2000 to 2011: trend analyses of four data samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276993
Source
Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Reidun Sandvik
Geir Selbaek
Oyvind Kirkevold
Dag Aarsland
Bettina Sandgathe Husebo
Source
Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):54-60
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - therapeutic use
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Cognition
Dementia - psychology
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Homes for the Aged - trends
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Nursing Homes - trends
Observational Studies as Topic
Odds Ratio
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - trends
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Time Factors
Abstract
the analgesic drug use has been reported to increase in general in nursing home patients. However, there is insufficient evidence in terms of what agents are used, variations of use over time and to whom these drugs are prescribed.
we investigated the prescribing patterns of scheduled analgesic drugs in Norwegian nursing home patients from 2000 to 2011, with the association to age, gender, cognitive function and type of nursing home unit.
secondary analyses of four study samples (three observational studies and one randomised controlled trial).
nursing home patients included in study samples from 2000 (n = 1,926), 2004 (n = 1,163), 2009 (n = 850) and 2011 (n = 1,858) located in 14 Norwegian counties.
trend analyses of analgesic drug prescriptions. Percentages were described using t-test, ?(2) and Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate logistic regression.
the odds ratio for receiving any pain medication in 2011 compared with 2000 was 2.6 (95% CI 2.23-2.91), this is corresponding to a 65% increase from 34.9 to 57.6%. The paracetamol prescription increased by 113%, from 22.7% in 2000 to 48.4% in 2011. Strong opioids (fentanyl, buprenorphine, morphine, oxycodone) increased from 1.9% in 2000 to 17.9% in 2011 (P
Notes
Comment In: Age Ageing. 2016 Jan;45(1):7-826764389
Erratum In: Age Ageing. 2016 Mar;45(2):32326941355
PubMed ID
26764395 View in PubMed
Less detail

An audit and feedback intervention study increased adherence to antibiotic prescribing guidelines at a Norwegian hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276521
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016;16:96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
June Utnes Høgli
Beate Hennie Garcia
Frode Skjold
Vegard Skogen
Lars Småbrekke
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2016;16:96
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Community-Acquired Infections - drug therapy
Disease Progression
Female
Formative Feedback
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Audit
Norway
Pneumonia - drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is associated with favourable levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and clinical outcomes. Most intervention studies on antibiotic prescribing originate from settings with high level of AMR. In a Norwegian hospital setting with low level of AMR, the literature on interventions for promoting guideline-recommended antibiotic prescribing in hospital is scarce and requested. Preliminary studies have shown improvement potentials regarding antibiotic prescribing according to guidelines. We aimed to promote appropriate antibiotic prescribing in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) at a respiratory medicine department in a Norwegian University hospital. Our specific objectives were to increase prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics, reduce high-dose benzylpenicillin and reduce total treatment duration.
We performed an audit and feedback intervention study, combined with distribution of a recently published pocket version of the national clinical practice guideline. We included patients discharged with CAP or AECOPD and prescribed antibiotics during hospital stay, and excluded those presenting with aspiration, nosocomial infection and co-infections. The pre- and post-intervention period was 9 and 6 months, respectively. Feedback was provided orally to the department physicians at an internal-educational meeting. To explore the effect of the intervention on appropriate empirical antibiotics and mean total treatment duration we applied before-after analysis (Student's t-test) and interrupted time series (ITS). We used Pearson's ?2 to compare dose changes.
In the pre-and post-intervention period we included 253 and 155 patients, respectively. Following the intervention, overall mean prescribing of appropriate empirical antibiotics increased from 61.7 to 83.8 % (P
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Mar;8(3):278-8211927025
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15:6425887603
Cites: Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2013 Mar;27(1):211-2823398876
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;(6):CD00025922696318
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Jun;54(11):1581-722495073
Cites: BMJ. 2010;340:c209620483949
Cites: Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2009 Jun 15;66(12 Suppl 4):S23-3019502225
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2009 Apr;15 Suppl 3:12-519366364
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Oct 23;128(20):2335-919096490
Cites: Drugs. 2008;68(13):1841-5418729535
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2008;3(1):31-4418488427
Cites: J Clin Pharm Ther. 2002 Aug;27(4):299-30912174032
Cites: Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2003 Jun;24(3):201-2012721392
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2003 Nov;52(5):764-7114563901
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Mar 8;164(5):502-815006826
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jun 10;332(7554):135516763247
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;(4):CD00354323633313
Cites: Lung. 2013 Jun;191(3):239-4623564195
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2006 Nov;12(11):1097-10417002609
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Jan 15;44(2):159-7717173212
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 May 28;133(10):1054-523712163
Cites: J Med Econ. 2013;16(6):809-1923574431
Cites: Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2013 Jul;14(10):1319-3223663104
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;57(2):188-9623572483
Cites: Thorax. 2013 Nov;68(11):1057-6524130229
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Feb;21(2):180.e1-725658564
Cites: Intern Med J. 2014 Sep;44(9):903-1024963727
Cites: ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:75913824578660
Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:1324405683
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2014 Feb;69(2):515-824022067
Cites: Acad Pediatr. 2013 Nov-Dec;13(6 Suppl):S38-4424268083
PubMed ID
26920549 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications in older people with cognitive impairment living in Northern Sweden using the EU(7)-PIM list.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288291
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Jun;73(6):735-742
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Eva Sönnerstam
Maria Sjölander
Maria Gustafsson
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Jun;73(6):735-742
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognitive Dysfunction - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - statistics & numerical data
Male
Potentially Inappropriate Medication List
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
As people get older, their sensitivity to drugs and adverse drug reactions can increase due to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes. Older people with dementia are a particularly vulnerable group of people. They are at an increased risk of being prescribed potentially inappropriate medications, which may lead to harmful consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications among older patients with cognitive impairment.
Medical records for patients aged =65 years admitted to two hospitals in Northern Sweden were reviewed. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified using the EU(7)-PIM list as an identification tool.
Of 428 patients included in the study, 40.9% had one or more potentially inappropriate medication prescribed. The most commonly represented potentially inappropriate medication classes were hypnotics and sedatives, cardiovascular drugs and laxatives. The most commonly involved potentially inappropriate medications were zopiclone, digoxin and sodium picosulfate. There was an association seen between having a higher number of medications prescribed and having one or more potentially inappropriate medication.
Potentially inappropriate medications are prevalent among older people with cognitive impairment living in Northern Sweden. It is important to continuously evaluate the need for potentially inappropriate medications in this patient group, in order to prevent adverse drug reactions, especially among those who have a higher number of medications prescribed.
Notes
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Nov-Dec;59(3):630-525192614
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2015 Apr;71(4):507-1525716889
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;23(6):395-40017396031
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Jan 23;12:6822269343
Cites: Clin Drug Investig. 2010;30(5):289-30020384385
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Apr;69(4):423-924293516
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2012 Mar;46(3):339-4622318931
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2008 Sep;17(9):912-818398935
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2010 Jan-Mar;24(1):56-6319561441
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Dec;26(8):606-1522207646
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010 Mar;65(3):318-2119843646
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2008;25(11):933-4618947261
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2015 Jul;71(7):861-7525967540
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Jul;53(7 Suppl):S264-7115982375
Cites: Eur J Intern Med. 2016 Nov;35:35-4227289492
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2012 Feb 1;29(2):143-5522204669
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Feb;61(2):258-6323320787
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Sep;72 (9):1143-5327377393
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2014 Mar;70(3):361-724362489
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Apr;57(4):M236-4011909889
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Aug;69(8):1589-9723588564
Cites: Age Ageing. 2014 Jul;43(4):515-2124334709
Cites: Int J Clin Pharm. 2015 Oct;37(5):815-2125986290
Cites: Can J Diabetes. 2016 Feb;40(1):73-626778684
PubMed ID
28246889 View in PubMed
Less detail

An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288091
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 07 25;6(7):e009641
Publication Type
Article
Date
07-25-2016
Author
David Weller
Peter Vedsted
Chantelle Anandan
Alina Zalounina
Evangelia Ourania Fourkala
Rakshit Desai
William Liston
Henry Jensen
Andriana Barisic
Anna Gavin
Eva Grunfeld
Mats Lambe
Rebecca-Jane Law
Martin Malmberg
Richard D Neal
Jatinderpal Kalsi
Donna Turner
Victoria White
Martine Bomb
Usha Menon
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 07 25;6(7):e009641
Date
07-25-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
Australia - epidemiology
Benchmarking
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer - standards
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - standards
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
United Kingdom - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses.
Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions.
Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients' PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and 'data rules' are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases.
Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (?=1) in four items and substantial (?=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types.
An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Mar 14;385(9972):977-101025467588
Cites: Health Policy. 2013 Sep;112(1-2):148-5523693117
Cites: Biometrics. 1989 Mar;45(1):255-682720055
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Aug;61(589):e508-1221801563
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2008 Jan 30;9:918234092
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2012 Oct 9;107(8):1220-622996611
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2003 Oct 20;3:2114567763
Cites: Nat Rev Cancer. 2006 Aug;6(8):603-1216862191
Cites: JAMA Surg. 2013 Jun;148(6):516-2323615681
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011 Oct 25;11:28422027084
Cites: Clin Epidemiol. 2014 Jul 17;6:237-4625083137
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2011 Mar 15;104(6):934-4021364593
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2014 Jan;15(1):23-3424314615
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2013 Feb 5;108(2):292-30023370208
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):919-3223581611
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 2012 Oct;127(1):75-8222750127
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2013 Apr 23;13:20323617741
Cites: Lung Cancer. 2012 Oct;78(1):51-622841591
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15;98(1):60-7018059401
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 May 27;5(5):e00721226017370
Cites: Fam Pract. 2012 Feb;29(1):69-7821828375
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(5):747-5519117750
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2015 Mar 31;112 Suppl 1:S92-10725734382
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2013 Mar 19;108(5):1195-20823449362
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2012 Jun;65(6):669-7822459430
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;38(1):100-524238619
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 May;61(586):e215-2221619745
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jan 8;377(9760):127-3821183212
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2012 Mar 27;106(7):1262-722415239
Cites: Fam Pract. 2007 Feb;24(1):3-617142248
Cites: Thorax. 2013 Jun;68(6):551-6423399908
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2013 Jun;49(9):2187-9823453935
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2013 Feb 19;108(3):686-9023392082
Cites: Radiother Oncol. 2007 Jul;84(1):5-1017493700
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2013 Jan;63(606):e30-623336455
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Aug;79(8):1053-52751028
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Aug 07;10(8):e013502726252203
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Dec;51(473):967-7111766868
PubMed ID
27456325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in Norwegian primary care out-of-hours service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290698
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2017 Jun; 35(2):178-185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Bent H Lindberg
Svein Gjelstad
Mats Foshaug
Sigurd Høye
Author Affiliation
a Hamar Out-of-hours Primary Care Centre , Hamar , Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2017 Jun; 35(2):178-185
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
After-Hours Care - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To examine factors correlating with antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in Norwegian primary care out-of-hours service.
Retrospective data analysis for the year 2014 in two out-of-hours primary care units located in the towns of Hamar and Tønsberg in Norway, analysing type and frequency of different antibiotics prescribed by 117 medical doctors for ARTIs, and factors correlating with these.
The 117 doctors in two out-of-hours units diagnosed 6757 cases of ARTIs. 2310 (34.2%) of these resulted in an antibiotic prescription, where of 1615 (69.9%) were penicillin V (PcV). Tonsillitis and sinusitis were the two ARTI diagnoses with the highest antibiotic prescription rate. The antibiotic prescription rate increased successively with increasing activity level, measured as shorter median duration of consultations per session, from 28.7% (reference) in the least busy quintile of sessions to 36.6% (OR: 1.38 (95% CI =1.06-1.80)) in the busiest quintile of sessions. Prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics was not correlated with median duration of consultations per session. Female doctors had an OR of 0.61 (0.40-0.92) of a broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription compared to their male colleagues.
Antibiotic prescribing for ARTIs in the primary care out-of-hours services investigated is at the same level as in Norwegian general practice, but with a higher prescription rate of PcV. Antibiotic prescribing increases on busy sessions, measured as median duration of consultations per session. The work frame in primary care out-of-hours service might influence the quality of clinical decisions.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2014 Dec;32(4):200-7 PMID 25350313
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Oct 23;128(20):2330-4 PMID 19096489
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Jul 15;5(7):e008096 PMID 26179648
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Dec;159(12):1145-9 PMID 16330738
Cites: J Am Board Fam Med. 2012 Nov-Dec;25(6):810-8 PMID 23136320
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Oct 23;128(20):2340-2 PMID 19096491
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Oct 9;177(8):877-83 PMID 17923655
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2011 Oct;66(10):2425-33 PMID 21784782
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004 Oct 18;(4):CD000245 PMID 15494994
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2014 Jun;20(2):114-20 PMID 23998298
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Jun;34(2):180-5 PMID 27054812
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Feb 12;289(6):719-25 PMID 12585950
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Jun;16(2):121-7 PMID 9689692
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Jul 26;347:f4403 PMID 23894178
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(1):CD000219 PMID 14973951
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Feb 19;133(4):385-6 PMID 23423201
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008 Apr 16;(2):CD000243 PMID 18425861
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Sep 22;135(17):1527 PMID 26394561
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2016 Jun 20;60(7):4106-18 PMID 27139474
Cites: Clin Ther. 2003 Sep;25(9):2419-30 PMID 14604741
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2009;27(4):208-15 PMID 19929185
PubMed ID
28569649 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic prescribing in primary care by international medical graduates and graduates from Swedish medical schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270259
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Thomas Neumark
Lars Brudin
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
Fam Pract. 2015 Jun;32(3):343-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
Foreign Medical Graduates - standards - statistics & numerical data
Geography
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
Studies of antibiotic prescribing related to diagnosis comparing prescribers trained abroad with those trained in Sweden are lacking.
To determine whether general practices (GPs) and GP residents trained abroad had different prescribing patterns for antibiotics for common infections than those trained in Sweden using retrospective data from electronic patient records from primary health care in Kalmar County, Sweden.
Consultations with an infection diagnosis, both with and without the prescription of antibiotics to 67 GPs and residents trained in Western Europe outside Sweden and other countries, were compared with a matched control group trained in Sweden.
For 1 year, 44101 consultations of patients with an infection diagnosis and 16276 prescriptions of antibiotics were registered. Foreign-trained physicians had 20% more visits compared with physicians trained in Sweden. The prescription of antibiotics per visit and physician in the respective groups, and independent of diagnosis, did not significantly differ between groups, when scaled down from number of consultations to number of prescribing physicians.
There were minor and non-significant differences in antibiotic prescribing comparing GPs and residents trained abroad and in Sweden, most likely the result of an adaptation to Swedish conditions. Nevertheless, no group prescribed antibiotics in accordance to national guidelines. The results suggest that interventions are needed to reduce irrational antibiotic prescribing patterns, targeting all physicians working in Swedish primary health care.
PubMed ID
25715961 View in PubMed
Less detail

183 records – page 1 of 19.