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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Evaluation of the quality of medical practice in rehabilitation medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220705
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1993 Jul-Sep;15(3):155-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y L Boulanger
L. Pezzi
Author Affiliation
Institut de réadaptation de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1993 Jul-Sep;15(3):155-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Medical Audit - methods
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Quality of Health Care
Rehabilitation - education - standards
Rehabilitation Centers - standards
Research - standards
Abstract
Evaluation of medical institutions, research and teaching in rehabilitation medicine is the prerequisite for planning, improvement and credibility. This article describes methods used in Canada to structure different levels of evaluation and create an atmosphere of positive reinforcement for clinicians.
PubMed ID
8374161 View in PubMed
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Facts about the fax: MDs advised to be cautious.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214089
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Oct 15;153(8):1152-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1995
Author
K. Capen
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Oct 15;153(8):1152-3
Date
Oct-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Confidentiality
Drug Prescriptions
Drug and Narcotic Control
Humans
Medical Records
Office Management
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Telefacsimile - instrumentation
Abstract
Physicians' now routine use of fax machines has drawn attention to the need for office policies and procedures to protect the confidentiality of medical records. The growing popularity of faxed prescriptions has also raised questions about prescribing violations. Lawyer Karen Capen outlines some of the legal concerns about the faxing of medical information, and suggests some precautions physicians can take to avoid problems.
PubMed ID
7553524 View in PubMed
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[Information, information technology and turning point of medical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170452
Source
Duodecim. 2006;122(1):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

Long-term follow-up in the Peer Assessment Program for nonspecialist physicians in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205232
Source
Jt Comm J Qual Improv. 1998 Jun;24(6):334-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P G Norton
E V Dunn
R. Beckett
D. Faulkner
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Jt Comm J Qual Improv. 1998 Jun;24(6):334-41
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Family Practice - classification - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forms and Records Control - standards
Humans
Licensure, Medical
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Peer Review, Health Care
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Total Quality Management - methods
Abstract
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario has assessed randomly selected physician office practices since 1972. Each assessment consists of a tour of the premises and a review of a random selection of 20 to 30 medical records to evaluate the system of record keeping and the content of the records and to thereby indicate the quality of the physician's examinations, history taking, diagnosis and management plan. About 12% of nonspecialist physicians who need help to improve their records and/or the care they provide are identified annually, and following an interview with peers and simple educational interventions, more than 75% are successful in improving.
A follow-up was conducted to assess physician practices an average of six years after the first intervention. The reviewers were blinded as to whether the physician being reviewed had been reviewed previously. Each revisited physician was matched to three others undergoing their initial assessments in the same year. The matching variables were age, sex, school of graduation (Canadian versus other), rural versus urban practice location, and affiliation status with the College of Family Physicians of Canada. The assessed performance of the two groups was compared.
The performance of the revisit group was significantly better than that of the matched group (p = 0.05).
The assessment, interview, and educational interventions undertaken by the licensing authority produced an improvement in practice in the short term in the bottom 10%-15% of all physicians reviewed, which was sustained for more than six years.
PubMed ID
9651795 View in PubMed
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Medicine and management: looking inside the box of changing hospital governance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285145
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 May 24;16 Suppl 2:159
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2016
Author
Ellen Kuhlmann
Ylva Rangnitt
Mia von Knorring
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 May 24;16 Suppl 2:159
Date
May-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Governance
Clinical Medicine - standards
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Health Policy
Hospitals, Public - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Physicians
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Professional Role
Sweden
Abstract
Health policy has strengthened the demand for coordination between clinicians and managers and introduced new medical manager roles in hospitals to better connect medicine and management. These developments have created a scholarly debate of concepts and an increasing 'hybridization' of tasks and roles, yet the organizational effects are not well researched. This research introduces a multi-level governance approach and aims to explore the organizational needs of doctors using Sweden as a case study.
We apply an assessment framework focusing on macro-meso levels and managerial-professional modes of hospital governance (using document analysis, secondary sources, and expert information) and expand the analysis towards the micro-level. Qualitative explorative empirical material gathered in two different studies in Swedish hospitals serves to pilot research into actor-centred perceptions of clinical management from the viewpoint of the 'managed' and the 'managing' doctors in an organization.
Sweden has developed a model of integrated hospital governance with complex structural coordination between medicine and management on the level of the organization. In terms of formal requirements, the professional background is less relevant for many management positions but in everyday work, medical managers are perceived primarily as colleagues and not as experts advising on managerial problems. The managers themselves seem to rely more on personal strength and medical knowledge than on management tools. Bringing doctors into management may hybridize formal roles and concepts, but it does not necessarily change the perceptions of doctors and improve managerial-professional coordination at the micro-level of the organization.
This study brings gaps in hospital governance into view that may create organizational weaknesses and unmet management needs, thereby constraining more coordinated and integrated medical management.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Med. 2009 Oct 26;7:6419857246
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PubMed ID
27230654 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1993 Feb 15;148(4):487
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1993
Author
F R Spicer
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Feb 15;148(4):487
Date
Feb-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Medical Records - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Risk Management - methods
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1992 Dec 15;147(12):1848-521458431
PubMed ID
8431810 View in PubMed
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The provision of specialist rheumatology care: implications from a survey of rheumatologists in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215162
Source
J Rheumatol. 1995 May;22(5):959-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
G A Hawker
E M Badley
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1995 May;22(5):959-66
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - manpower
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Practice Management, Medical - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Research
Rheumatology - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To describe the practice characteristics and whereabouts of rheumatologists in Ontario, Canada in order to make inferences regarding the current status of clinical rheumatology services.
All 136 identified Ontario rheumatologists received a self-administered, mailed questionnaire.
The adjusted response rate was 74.2%. For respondents, there was a mean of 14.4 years in practice (1-42 years), 74.7% were male, and 91.3% were practising in urban and/or suburban locations. Only 6 were practising principally in remote northern locations. Sixty-three percent of respondents had a university faculty appointment; 40.4% geographic full time (GFT) and 22.3% clinical only. University appointed rheumatologists, and in particular those with GFT status, were more likely to have a particular clinical focus (p
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 1995 May;22(5):805-68587063
PubMed ID
8587089 View in PubMed
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[The basic system for the management of a spa and resort facility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104046
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2014 May-Jun;(3):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Fedotchenko
N A Kholmogorov
Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2014 May-Jun;(3):59-61
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Baths - standards
Health Resorts - standards
Humans
Practice Management, Medical - standards
Russia
Abstract
The authors propose the basic system for the management of a spa and resort facility that ensures functioning of all its divisions as an integrated process. It is maintained that organization of a spa and resort facility must include measures aimed at improving its working structure, material and technical resources, marketing plans, financial management, medical services, informational support, and personnel administration.
PubMed ID
25087423 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.