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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[Air dust level in the cabins of excavators at the Borodinskii coal-stripping section of the Kansk-Achinsk Fuel and Energy complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237454
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1986 Feb;(2):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986

Chernobyl: an unbelievable failure to help.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92347
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2008;38(3):543-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bertell Rosalie
Author Affiliation
International Physicians for Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva. rosaliebertell@greynun.org
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2008;38(3):543-60
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bias (epidemiology)
Byelarus
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health education
Humans
International Cooperation
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Power Plants - standards
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Radiation Protection - standards
Relief Work
Research Design - standards
Russia
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Ukraine
World Health Organization
Young Adult
Abstract
The disaster at the Chernobyl power reactor near Kiev, which began on April 26, 1986, was one of the world's worst industrial accidents. Yet the global community, usually most generous in its aid to a stricken community, has been slow to understand the scope of the disaster and reach out to the most devastated people of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. This article probes the causes of this confusion of perception and failure of response; clearly the problem is one of communication. Has the International Atomic Energy Agency betrayed the victims of the Chernobyl disaster because of its plans to promote the "peaceful atom" nuclear program in the developing world? Has the World Health Organization failed to provide clear, reliable information on the health effects resulting from the disaster? Are other historical problems or actors interfering with reasonable handling of the late effects of a nuclear disaster? Most importantly, what can be done to remedy this situation, to assist those most hurt by the late effects of Chernobyl and prevent such injustice in future? With the current promotion of nuclear energy as a "solution" to global climate change, we need to take a sober second look at the nuclear energy experiment and management of its hazards.
PubMed ID
18724581 View in PubMed
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[Delayed and transgenerational molecular and genetic effects of prolonged influence of ionizing radiation in nuclear plant workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134977
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Jan-Feb;51(1):20-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
V G Bezlepkin
E N Kirillova
M L Zakharova
O S Pavlova
M G Lomaeva
L A Fomenko
V N Antipova
A I Gaziev
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Jan-Feb;51(1):20-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Burden
DNA - analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
Female
Genetic markers
Genomic Instability
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Nuclear Power Plants - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - genetics - immunology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - genetics - immunology
Radiation, Ionizing
Russia
Time Factors
Workplace - standards
Abstract
Genome variability and changes in immune homeostasis, induced in man in the course of long-term industrial contact with ionizing radiation (IR) sources were studied by using unique biomaterials stored in the Radiobiological Repository for Human Tissues at the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, FMBA. The biomaterials, peripheral blood samples and blood DNA were obtained from the "Mayak" PA employers occupationally exposed to prolonged external gamma-radiation and/or internal alpha-radiation from incorporated 239Pu in a wide range of accumulated doses. A significant increase in the polymorphism of microsatellite-associated peripheral blood DNA repeats was revealed in a group of persons with accumulated doses of external gamma-radiation above 2.0 Gy, as well as in the descendants of parents with preconceptive doses of higher than 2.0 Gy. In persons whose parents had a preconceptive dose above 2.0 Gy, an increase in the gene p53 mutation rate was observed, and descendants of persons with dose of 3.0 Gy and higher showed mtDNA heteroplasmy, regardless of the sex of an exposed parent. Changes in the expression of membrane markers for the effector and regulatory T-lymphocytes depending on radiation type and dose load were determined. The growth factor level variations (TGF-beta1, EGF, HGF, FGF) in peripheral blood serum in persons exposed to radiation from gamma- or alpha-sources, allow us to consider them as biomarkers of radiation-induced disturbances in immune homeostasis. The concentration changes of TGF-beta1, apoptosis proteins (p53, TPA-cyk, sAPO-1/Fas), and the adhesion molecule sCD27 in the case of cardiovascular diseases in the serum of both irradiated and non-irradiated "Mayak" PA employers point to the information value of these immune response characteristics as specific biomarkers of cardiac disorders. It is proposed that the revealed changes in immune homeostasis and in the variability of somatic cell genome may provoke development of tumors and cardiovascular diseases in man in delayed periods after prolonged exposure to IR.
PubMed ID
21520613 View in PubMed
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[Experience with improving working conditions in the heating chamber of the electric power plant].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233287
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1988 Apr;(4):46-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988

[Interaction of genetic and radiation factors in the realization of effects of radiation in humans].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115857
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):75-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Tel'nov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Nov-Dec;(6):75-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Nuclear Power Plants - standards
Occupational Diseases - genetics
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - genetics
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - genetics
Risk assessment
Russia
Workplace - standards
Abstract
The results of the study of the interaction of genetic and radiation factors in the effects of radiation in humans exposed to external and (or) internal radiation are presented. In most cases, with relatively less radiation exposure genotypic differences in the effects of exposure were established to be absent. At high intensities of radiation exposure, however, these differences as a rule have reliable character. Interaction of genetic and radiation factors manifested in a wide range: from the mutual stimulation of primarily inactive factors to the higher than multiplicative one.
PubMed ID
23458004 View in PubMed
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[Radiation-hygienic principles of optimal radiation monitoring in the surveillance areas of atomic power stations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232875
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Jul;(7):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988

[The location of wind-mill electric generating plants: hygienic aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146789
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
I S Kireeva
Iu D Dumanskii
P V Semashko
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):23-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Health - organization & administration
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Noise - adverse effects
Power Plants - standards
Russia
Wind
Abstract
The hygienic aspects of the location of wind-mill electric generating plants become more pressing due to the intensive development of wind-power engineering. Possible risk factors from wind-mill electric generating plants that can influence the environment and the population are considered. A 400-m control area is recommended on the basis of the made calculations of an acoustic and electromagnetic pollution area, an exposure area during emergency situations, as well the field measuring data on noise from wind-mill electric generating plants with a capacity of 20 MW, by applying 100-kW wind-mill electric generating units. Further studies are proposed to improve the differentiated sizes of control areas for wind-mill electric generating plants with wind-mill electric generating units of varying capacity.
PubMed ID
20000087 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.