Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1045 records – page 1 of 105.

[15 years after Chernobyl--what have we learned?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19464
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Oct 22;163(43):5955
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-22-2001

[15 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19138
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Buldakov
A K Gus'kova
Author Affiliation
State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Health effects as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred in 1986 are considered in the paper. Wrong prognosis of the health effects with respect to mortality and morbidity among the population exposed to low radiation doses is shown. Proven increase in thyroid cancer cases among people who were children aged from 0 to 18 at the time of the accident is shown. Linear relationship between thyroid cancer cases and dose to thyroid ranged from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy is considered. An additional absolute risk of thyroid cancer in children varies in the range 1.9-2.6 cases per 10(4) person-year Gy. During the fifteen years following the accident no cases of acute and chronic radiation sickness have been revealed because the population living in contaminated areas received low radiation doses. Also, exposures to low radiation doses did not result in excess of malignant tumors among population. In some cases the outcomes of acute radiation sickness were as follows: radiation damages to the skin, cancer cataracts, development of oncopathology.
PubMed ID
12004624 View in PubMed
Less detail

[20-year morpholoogical findings in the study of medical aftereffects of the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82012
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lushnikov E F
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Mar-Apr;68(2):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Accidents, Radiation - mortality
Byelarus
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Russia
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Presented are the results of morphological studies of radiation sickness, congenital malformations and malignant tumors which have developed in Chemobyl victims. Until now consequences of the accident remain a subject of practical and research medicine. Scope of relevant topical problems the pathologists will have to investigate in the future is discussed.
PubMed ID
16752499 View in PubMed
Less detail

131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
Less detail

131I content in the human thyroid estimated from direct measurements of the inhabitants of Russian areas contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30700
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
A A Bratilova
I A Zvonova
M I Balonov
N G Shishkanov
V I Trushin
M. Hoshi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira st. 8, 197136, St Petersburg, Russia. bratilov@comset.net
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2003;105(1-4):623-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radiometry - methods
Russia
Thyroid Gland - metabolism
Ukraine
Abstract
The method of processing and the results of measurements of 131I content in the thyroids of Russian people performed in May-June 1986 are presented. The contribution of radiation from Cs radionuclides in the human body was taken into account in the processing of measurement data with an SRP-68-01 device. The greatest individual 131I content was found in the thyroids of inhabitants of the Bryansk region, up to 250-350 kBq, and in the Tula and Orel regions, up to 100 kBq. The average 131I thyroid activity in the middle of May 1986 reached 80 kBq for inhabitants of some settlements in the Bryansk region, 5-8 kBq in the Tula region and 5 kBq in the Orel region.
PubMed ID
14527038 View in PubMed
Less detail

137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel Oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35314
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
W S Watson
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Body Burden
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Ukraine
Notes
Comment On: Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-58056594
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 Dec;69(6):9877493819
PubMed ID
7730075 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case of non-Hodgkin T-cell lymphoma with predominantly cutaneous manifestations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23132
Source
Clin Ter. 1995 Aug-Sep;146(8-9):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. di Tondo
M. Pergolini
L. Coppotelli
P. Visca
B. Monarca
M. Paradiso
S. Basili
M. Leonardo
E. Paris
C. Cordova
Author Affiliation
Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Istituto di Terapia Medica.
Source
Clin Ter. 1995 Aug-Sep;146(8-9):537-42
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
English Abstract
Ethiopia - ethnology
Fatal Outcome
Humans
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - etiology - pathology
Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced
Power Plants
Ukraine
Abstract
There is a wealth of experiences concerning cancer and leukemia induced in human populations by radiation. The contribution of the nuclear industry to the radiation exposure of the general population is small, but there is the risk of catastrophic accidents causing a large number of deaths. The authors describe the case of a 48 year old black man accidentally exposed to the effects of radiations during the nuclear disaster of Chernobyl in 1986. The patient showed, many years later, a predominantly cutaneous high-grade T cell lymphoma, which was refractory to traditional treatments but sensitive to high doses of a recombinant interferon. Unluckily the patient died, six months later, because of autoinfection overwhelming. The goal of the authors is again to ask to reflect on the risk of the use of nuclear power and to debate the possible choice of the still experimental treatments.
PubMed ID
8536436 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accident at Chernobyl and trisomy 21 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36798
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
T. Harjulehto-Mervaala
R. Salonen
T. Aro
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Matched-Pair Analysis
Maternal Age
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Trisomy
Ukraine
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether the radiation fallout in Finland after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 led to an increased incidence of trisomy 21. In this geographic and temporal cohort study, the country was divided into three zones according to the amounts of radioactive fallout and internal radiation caused by two cesium isotopes. The 518 cytologically verified cases of trisomy 21 were divided into a control group (conceived before the accident), and a study group of children whose expected dates of birth were in the post-accident years 1987-1988, i.e., pregnancies commenced after May 1986. The cases were also divided into three subgroups according to the zones of radiation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of trisomy 21 between the control and study groups nor between the three zones in spite of the significant differences in the levels of radiation and in the body burden that prevailed throughout the study period. Power estimates showed that in the two zones of lower radiation, an increase of 0.5% in the prevalence would have been detected with a power of 0.85, and in the somewhat smaller zone of the highest radiation, with a power of 0.70. The study lends no further support to the view that the low radiation fallout in western Europe would have been causally associated with trisomy 21.
PubMed ID
1379341 View in PubMed
Less detail

1045 records – page 1 of 105.