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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
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Abuse of power in the nurse-client relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204640
Source
Nurs Stand. 1998 Jun 3-9;12(37):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Gallop
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing Science, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Stand. 1998 Jun 3-9;12(37):43-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Humans
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Mandatory Reporting
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
A small number of health professionals are at risk of stepping over the boundaries of acceptable behaviour towards their clients. While sexual misconduct is clearly defined, the author argues that other inappropriate behaviours are harder to define--especially in nursing where touch is an important component of care.
PubMed ID
9732633 View in PubMed
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Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300151
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 15; 16(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-15-2019
Author
Anna-Karin Lindqvist
Marie Löf
Anna Ek
Stina Rutberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Sweden. annlin@ltu.se.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 15; 16(2):
Date
01-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bicycling
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Power (Psychology)
Schools
Seasons
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Transportation - methods
Abstract
There has been a decline in children's use of active school transportation (AST) while there is also limited research concerning AST in winter conditions. This study aimed to explore the prerequisites and experiences of schoolchildren and parents participating in an empowerment- and gamification-inspired intervention to promote students' AST in winter conditions. Methods: Thirty-five students, who were aged 12?13 years, and 34 parents from the north of Sweden participated in the study. Data were collected using photovoice and open questions in a questionnaire and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The results show that involvement and togetherness motivated the students to use AST. In addition, during the project, the parents changed to have more positive attitudes towards their children's use of AST. The students reported that using AST during wintertime is strenuous but rewarding and imparts a sense of pride. Conclusion: Interventions for increasing students' AST in winter conditions should focus on the motivational aspects for both children and parents. For overcoming parental hesitation with regards to AST during winter, addressing their concerns and empowering the students are key factors. To increase the use of AST all year around, targeting the challenges perceived during the winter is especially beneficial.
PubMed ID
30650653 View in PubMed
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Adaptability and sustainability of an Indigenous Australian family wellbeing initiative in the context of Papua New Guinea: a follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131544
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Russel Kitau
Komla Tsey
Janya McCalman
Mary Whiteside
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea, Port Moresby, PNG. rkitau@hotmail.com
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Papua New Guinea
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This paper describes the follow-up phase of a pilot collaborative initiative between the University of Papua New Guinea and James Cook University aimed at determining the relevance of an Indigenous Australian Family Wellbeing (FWB) empowerment program in the context of Papua New Guinea (PNG). It describes opportunities and challenges involved in adapting and sustaining the FWB approach to the PNG context. Two evaluation questionnaires were administered to 60 course participants.
Findings revealed that the course was relevant, adaptable and could readily be integrated with other health programs. In the context of PNG's target to meet its United Nations Millennium Development Goals by 2015, the Family Wellbeing approach offers an innovative approach to enhance existing health and community development initiatives.
PubMed ID
21878028 View in PubMed
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Adding quality to day centre activities for people with psychiatric disabilities: Staff perceptions of an intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273214
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mona Eklund
Christel Leufstadius
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2016;23(1):13-22
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Day Care Centers - organization & administration - standards
Community Mental Health Centers - organization & administration
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Focus Groups
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Narration
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Quality Improvement
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate an intervention aimed at enriching day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities by exploring staff experiences from developing and implementing the intervention.
Each staff group developed a tailor-made intervention plan, following a manual, for how to enrich the day centre. They received supervision and support from the research team. The study was based on focus-group interviews with a total of 13 staff members at four day centres. Narrative analysis with a thematic approach was used. A first round resulted in one narrative per centre. These centre-specific narratives were then integrated into a common narrative that covered all the data.
A core theme emerged: User involvement permeated the implementation process and created empowerment. It embraced four themes forming a timeline: "Mix of excitement, worries and hope", "Confirmation and development through dialogue, feedback and guidance", "The art of integrating new activities and strategies with the old", and "Empowerment-engendered future aspirations".
The users' involvement and empowerment were central for the staff in accomplishing the desired changes in services, as were their own reflections and learning. A possible factor that may have contributed to the positive outcomes was that those who were central in developing the plan were the same as those who implemented it.
PubMed ID
26206294 View in PubMed
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Advocacy oral history: a research methodology for social activism in nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207189
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
A R Rafael
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 1997 Dec;20(2):32-44
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Feminism
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Nursing Research - methods
Ontario
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Public health nursing
Reproducibility of Results
Social Change
Social Justice
Abstract
The reinstatement of social activism as a central feature of nursing practice has been advocated by nursing scholars and is consistent with contemporary conceptualizations of primary health care and health promotion that are rooted in critical social theory's concept of empowerment. Advocacy oral history from a feminist postmodern perspective offers a method of research that has the potential and purpose to empower participants to transform their political and social realities and may, therefore, be considered social activism. A recent study of public health nurses who had experienced significant distress through the reduction and redirection of their practice is provided as an exemplar of advocacy oral history. Philosophies underpinning the research method and characteristics of feminist postmodern research are reviewed and implications for the use of this methodology for social activism in nursing are drawn.
PubMed ID
9398937 View in PubMed
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Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130778
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Aura Kagan
Author Affiliation
Education and Applied Research, Aphasia Institute, Toronto, Canada. akagan@aphasia.ca
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphasia - psychology - rehabilitation
Awareness
Communication
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Motivation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Indicators, Health Care - trends
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
Abstract
Aphasia centers are in an excellent position to contribute to the broad definition of health by the World Health Organization: the ability to live life to its full potential. An expansion of this definition by the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) forms the basis for a user-friendly and ICF-compatible framework for planning interventions that ensure maximum real-life outcome and impact for people with aphasia and their families. This article describes Living with Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement and its practical application to aphasia centers in the areas of direct service, outcome measurement, and advocacy and awareness. Examples will be drawn from the Aphasia Institute in Toronto. A case will be made for all aphasia centers to use the ICF or an adaptation of it to further the work of this sector and strengthen its credibility.
PubMed ID
21968558 View in PubMed
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550 records – page 1 of 55.