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Benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs in three low-income Ontario communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193476
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H G Edward
S. Evers
Author Affiliation
St. Joseph's Health Care System Research Network, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Diet
Female
Focus Groups
Food Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Ontario
Poverty - psychology
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs. We did a content analysis of focus groups with parents (n=21), teachers (n=10), project staff (n=21), and children (n=17) in three low-income Ontario communities. The key benefits identified by the three adult groups were hunger alleviation and social contact opportunities for both parents and children. Parents also benefited from volunteering with and/or participating in food programs because neighbourhood support networks developed. Teachers reported that children who attended breakfast programs became more attentive in school. The food programs also provided an opportunity for nutrition education. Offering food as part of all community programs (not just those designed to increase food availability) encouraged participation and increased attendance. Children thought that attending food programs kept them healthy, and helped them work harder in school. Parents' pride was the main barrier to participation in programs; however, parents who were actively involved in program delivery did not feel stigmatized accepting food. To encourage participation, nutrition professionals should collaborate with local residents to develop and implement community-based food programs.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002 Summer;63(2):52; author reply 52-312084182
PubMed ID
11524050 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity and children's mental health: a prospective birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117405
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e52615
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Maria Melchior
Jean-François Chastang
Bruno Falissard
Cédric Galéra
Richard E Tremblay
Sylvana M Côté
Michel Boivin
Author Affiliation
INSERM U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Epidemiology of Occupational and Social Determinants of Health, F-94807 Villejuif, France. maria.melchior@inserm.fr
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e52615
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental health
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Poverty - psychology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Food insecurity (which can be defined as inadequate access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food that meets individuals' dietary needs) is concurrently associated with children's psychological difficulties. However, the predictive role of food insecurity with regard to specific types of children's mental health symptoms has not previously been studied. We used data from the Longitudinal Study of Child Development in Québec, LSCDQ, a representative birth cohort study of children born in the Québec region, in Canada, in 1997-1998 (n?=?2120). Family food insecurity was ascertained when children were 1½ and 4½ years old. Children's mental health symptoms were assessed longitudinally using validated measures of behaviour at ages 4½, 5, 6 and 8 years. Symptom trajectory groups were estimated to identify children with persistently high levels of depression/anxiety (21.0%), aggression (26.2%), and hyperactivity/inattention (6.0%). The prevalence of food insecurity in the study was 5.9%. In sex-adjusted analyses, children from food-insecure families were disproportionately likely to experience persistent symptoms of depression/anxiety (OR: 1.79, 95% CI 1.15-2.79) and hyperactivity/inattention (OR: 3.06, 95% CI 1.68-5.55). After controlling for immigrant status, family structure, maternal age at child's birth, family income, maternal and paternal education, prenatal tobacco exposure, maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting, only persistent hyperactivity/inattention remained associated with food insecurity (fully adjusted OR: 2.65, 95% CI 1.16-6.06). Family food insecurity predicts high levels of children's mental health symptoms, particularly hyperactivity/inattention. Addressing food insecurity and associated problems in families could help reduce the burden of mental health problems in children and reduce social inequalities in development.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23300723 View in PubMed
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Infant nutrition in Saskatoon: barriers to infant food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143057
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(2):79-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Brendine Partyka
Susan Whiting
Deanna Grunerud
Karen Archibald
Kara Quennell
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(2):79-84
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - psychology
Child Health Services
Female
Focus Groups
Food Services
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - economics
Infant Formula - administration & dosage - economics
Male
Nutritional Status
Parents - psychology
Poverty - psychology
Saskatchewan
Abstract
We explored infant nutrition in Saskatoon by assessing current accessibility to all forms of infant nourishment, investigating challenges in terms of access to infant nutrition, and determining the use and effectiveness of infant nutrition programs and services. We also examined recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon.
Semi-structured community focus groups and stakeholder interviews were conducted between June 2006 and August 2006. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes related to infant feeding practices and barriers, as well as recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon.
Our study showed that infant food security is a concern among lower-income families in Saskatoon. Barriers that limited breastfeeding sustainability or nourishing infants through other means included knowledge of feeding practices, lack of breastfeeding support, access and affordability of infant formula, transportation, and poverty.
Infant nutrition and food security should be improved by expanding education and programming opportunities, increasing breastfeeding support, and identifying acceptable ways to provide emergency formula. If infant food security is to be addressed successfully, discussion and change must occur in social policy and family food security contexts.
PubMed ID
20525419 View in PubMed
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Maternal prenatal smoking, parental antisocial behavior, and early childhood physical aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157653
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2008;20(2):437-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Stephan C J Huijbregts
Jean R Séguin
Mark Zoccolillo
Michel Boivin
Richard E Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Studies, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Faculty of Social Sciences, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9555, 2300RB Leiden, The Netherlands. SHuijbregts@fsw.leidenuniv.nl
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2008;20(2):437-53
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers - psychology
Poverty - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Quebec
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study investigated joint effects of maternal prenatal smoking and parental history of antisocial behavior on physical aggression between ages 17 and 42 months in a population sample of children born in Québec (N = 1,745). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant main effects of maternal prenatal smoking and a significant interaction between maternal prenatal smoking and mother's history of antisocial behavior in the prediction of children's probability to display high and rising physical aggression. The interaction indicated that the effects of heavy smoking during pregnancy (> or =10 cigarettes/day) were greater when the mother also had a serious history of antisocial behavior. The effects remained significant after the introduction of control variables (e.g., hostile-reactive parenting, family functioning, parental separation/divorce, family income, and maternal education). Another significant interaction not accounted for by control variables was observed for maternal prenatal smoking and family income, indicating more serious effects of maternal prenatal smoking under relatively low-income, conditions. Both interactions indicate critical adversities that, in combination with maternal prenatal smoking, have supra-additive effects on (the development of) physical aggression during early childhood. These findings may have implications for the selection of intervention targets and strategies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18423088 View in PubMed
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Sheway's services for substance using pregnant and parenting women: evaluating the outcomes for infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170031
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2005;24(1):19-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Sheila K Marshall
Grant Charles
Jan Hare
James J Ponzetti
Monica Stokl
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work & Family Studies, University of British Columbia.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2005;24(1):19-34
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
British Columbia
Community Health Centers
Education - methods
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Parenting - psychology
Poverty - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Social Problems
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
Sheway is a single-access comprehensive street-front service to pregnant and parenting women with a history of alcohol and/or drug abuse that is located in one of Canada's poorest neighbourhoods, the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. This investigation assesses the concurrent health and social problems clients report upon entry into the program, service utilization, and the impact of services on neonate and infant well-being. Data were collected through the review of files from the 9 1/2 years of the agency's service. Findings suggest that the clients' concurrent health and social problems have increased over the years of operation while indicators of infant health have either improved or maintained steady rates.
PubMed ID
16568619 View in PubMed
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Welfare policies and very young children: experimental data on stage-environment fit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154331
Source
Dev Psychol. 2008 Nov;44(6):1557-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Heather D Hill
Pamela Morris
Author Affiliation
School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. hhill@uchicago.edu
Source
Dev Psychol. 2008 Nov;44(6):1557-71
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Canada
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Employment
Female
Humans
Income
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Personality Development
Poverty - psychology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Social Welfare
United States
Abstract
The authors examined the effects of welfare programs that increased maternal employment and family income on the development of very young children using data from 5 random-assignment experiments. The children were 6 months to 3 years old when their mothers entered the programs; cognitive and behavioral outcomes were measured 2-5 years later. While there were no overall program impacts, positive or negative, on the development of children in this age group, there was a pair of domain- and age-specific effects: The programs decreased positive social behavior among 1-year-olds and increased school achievement among 2-year-olds. After exploring several explanations for these results, the authors suggest that the contextual changes engendered by the programs, including children's exposure to center-based child care, interacted differentially with specific developmental transitions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18999322 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.