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Academic Achievement of American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Does Social Emotional Competence Reduce the Impact of Poverty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290702
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Jennifer Chain
Valerie B Shapiro
Paul A LeBuffe
Ann McKay Bryson
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2017; 24(1):1-29
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Alaska Natives - psychology
Child
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Poverty - psychology
Social Skills
Students - psychology
Abstract
Social-emotional competence may be a protective factor for academic achievement among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. This study used Fisher's r to Z transformations to test for group differences in the magnitude of relationships between social-emotional competence and achievement. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the variance in academic achievement explained by student race, poverty, and social-emotional competence, and the schoolwide percentage of students by race. Data are from 335 students across 6 schools. This study suggests that promoting social-emotional competence among AI/AN students could be a strategy for reducing disparities in academic achievement and the consequences of these disparities.
PubMed ID
28562835 View in PubMed
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[Adaptability of physicians offering primary care to the poor: social competency revisited].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105305
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):59-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Christine Loignon
Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine familiale, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):59-70
Date
Oct-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Paternalism
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - psychology - standards
Poverty - psychology
Primary Health Care - methods
Quebec
Social Behavior
Abstract
This paper attempts to go deeper into the topic of social competency of physicians who provide primary care to populations living in poverty in Montreal. Adaptability as well as the ability to tailor practices according to patient expectations, needs and capabilities were found to be important in the development of the concept of social competency. The case of paternalism is used to demonstrate how a historically and socially contested medical approach is readapted by players in certain contexts in order to better meet patient expectations. This paper presents data collected in a qualitative study comprising 25 semi-supervised interviews with physicians recognized by their peers as having developed exemplary practices in Montreal's impoverished neighbourhoods.
PubMed ID
24289940 View in PubMed
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Advantages and limitations of web-based surveys: evidence from a child mental health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147314
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Einar Heiervang
Robert Goodman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Unifob Health, Bergen, Norway. Einar.Heiervang@rbup.uib.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Jan;46(1):69-76
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies - economics - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys - economics - methods - standards
Humans
Internet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards - utilization
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires - economics - standards
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Web-based surveys may have advantages related to the speed and cost of data collection as well as data quality. However, they may be biased by low and selective participation. We predicted that such biases would distort point-estimates such as average symptom level or prevalence but not patterns of associations with putative risk-factors.
A structured psychiatric interview was administered to parents in two successive surveys of child mental health. In 2003, parents were interviewed face-to-face, whereas in 2006 they completed the interview online. In both surveys, interviews were preceded by paper questionnaires covering child and family characteristics.
The rate of parents logging onto the web site was comparable to the response rate for face-to-face interviews, but the rate of full response (completing all sections of the interview) was much lower for web-based interviews. Full response was less frequent for non-traditional families, immigrant parents, and less educated parents. Participation bias affected point estimates of psychopathology but had little effect on associations with putative risk factors. The time and cost of full web-based interviews was only a quarter of that for face-to-face interviews.
Web-based surveys may be performed faster and at lower cost than more traditional approaches with personal interviews. Selective participation seems a particular threat to point estimates of psychopathology, while patterns of associations are more robust.
PubMed ID
19921078 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native substance abuse: co-morbidity and cultural issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3313
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2001;10(2):67-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
N. Gray
P S Nye
Author Affiliation
University of Arizona College of Public Health, Tucson, AZ, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2001;10(2):67-84
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Poverty - psychology
Prevalence
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The devastating impact of substance abuse on American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) is reviewed with an emphasis on psychological and physical effects. Co-morbidity of substance abuse, trans-generational trauma, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and depression among AI/ANs is also discussed since each condition may cause, impact, and/or exacerbate the others. The Medicine Wheel, one respected and accepted treatment approach developed by AI/AN communities, is described in detail since it helps address all of the co-morbid issues discussed.
PubMed ID
11698984 View in PubMed
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Barriers to healthful eating and supplement use in lower-income adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143058
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(2):70-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Susan J Whiting
Hassanali Vatanparast
Jeff G Taylor
Jennifer L Adolphe
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy & Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2010;71(2):70-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Diet - psychology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - psychology
Saskatchewan
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated barriers to healthful eating and vitamin/mineral supplement use among groups at risk for low nutrient intakes, particularly those with low income.
Twelve focus groups (73 participants) and 11 key informant interviews were conducted in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Focus group participants represented a diverse population. Key informants included health professionals and personnel from community-based organizations who worked in a low-income area. Focus group meetings and key informant interviews were audiotaped and transcribed; thematic coding was used to identify key concepts.
The focus groups and interviews revealed five themes on barriers to healthful eating and to the use of vitamin/mineral supplements: knowledge, income, accessibility, health, and preferences. Key informants were aware of the barriers, and were able to see not only individual and family reasons but also societal influences.
The study results provide valuable information for focusing efforts on reducing barriers to healthful eating and to appropriate vitamin/mineral supplement use.
PubMed ID
20525418 View in PubMed
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Benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs in three low-income Ontario communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193476
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H G Edward
S. Evers
Author Affiliation
St. Joseph's Health Care System Research Network, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Diet
Female
Focus Groups
Food Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Ontario
Poverty - psychology
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs. We did a content analysis of focus groups with parents (n=21), teachers (n=10), project staff (n=21), and children (n=17) in three low-income Ontario communities. The key benefits identified by the three adult groups were hunger alleviation and social contact opportunities for both parents and children. Parents also benefited from volunteering with and/or participating in food programs because neighbourhood support networks developed. Teachers reported that children who attended breakfast programs became more attentive in school. The food programs also provided an opportunity for nutrition education. Offering food as part of all community programs (not just those designed to increase food availability) encouraged participation and increased attendance. Children thought that attending food programs kept them healthy, and helped them work harder in school. Parents' pride was the main barrier to participation in programs; however, parents who were actively involved in program delivery did not feel stigmatized accepting food. To encourage participation, nutrition professionals should collaborate with local residents to develop and implement community-based food programs.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002 Summer;63(2):52; author reply 52-312084182
PubMed ID
11524050 View in PubMed
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The Better Beginnings, Better Futures Project: a universal, comprehensive, community-based prevention approach for primary school children and their families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185963
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2003 Jun;32(2):215-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Ray DeV Peters
Kelly Petrunka
Robert Arnold
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Queen's University. petrunka@post.queensu.ca
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2003 Jun;32(2):215-27
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychosocial Deprivation
Remedial Teaching
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evaluated a community-based, universal project designed to prevent emotional and behavioral problems and promote general development in young children, while also attempting to improve family and neighborhood characteristics, to link effectively with existing services, and to involve local residents in project development and implementation. The research involved 554 4-year-old children and their families living in 3 disadvantaged neighborhoods in Ontario, Canada. Longitudinal analyses of changes over the first 5 years of project operation indicated significant improvements in children's and parents' social-emotional functioning and physical health, parenting behaviors, and neighborhood and school characteristics. The findings from the Better Beginnings, Better Futures Project are encouraging and provide unique evidence for the extent to which a universal, comprehensive, community-based prevention strategy can promote the longer term development of young children, their families, and their neighborhoods.
PubMed ID
12679279 View in PubMed
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Bridging the poverty gap in dental education: how can people living in poverty help us?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148686
Source
J Dent Educ. 2009 Sep;73(9):1043-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Martine C Lévesque
Sophie Dupéré
Christine Loignon
Alissa Levine
Isabelle Laurin
Anne Charbonneau
Christophe Bedos
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, 3550 University St., Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Dent Educ. 2009 Sep;73(9):1043-54
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Communication
Confidentiality
Culture
Dental Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Education, Dental
Empathy
Feedback
Female
Financing, Personal
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Poverty - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Quebec
Social Welfare
Transportation of Patients
Video Recording
Abstract
Dental education on specific knowledge and intervention approaches for working with people living on welfare is crucial to the therapeutic success of the relationships dental professionals establish with this clientele. Despite growing attention to the importance of cultural competence and communication skills training in dentistry, very few initiatives have been documented in relation to serving low-income populations. Following discussions at a 2006 Montreal-based colloquium on access to dental care, academics, dental association administrators, and public health agency and antipoverty coalition representatives began collaborating to develop innovative pedagogy designed to increase providers' competence in interacting with their underprivileged patients. The group's first round of workshops (November 2006-October 2007) resulted in the creation of an original video-based tool containing testimonies from six individuals living currently or formerly on welfare. The videotaped interview data represent their perceptions and experiences regarding their oral health, dental care service provision, and poverty in general. This article describes the participative methods, the content of the resulting DVD, and the implications of the "Listening to Each Other" program, a collaborative knowledge translation approach for improving interaction between underprivileged people and dental care providers.
PubMed ID
19734245 View in PubMed
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Cancer in working-age is not associated with childhood adversities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145686
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 May;49(4):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sonja K Korpimäki
Markku P T Sumanen
Lauri H Sillanmäki
Kari J Mattila
Author Affiliation
Tampere Health Centre, Tampere, Finland. sonja.korpimaki@uta.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 May;49(4):436-40
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Educational Status
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Obesity - psychology
Poverty - psychology
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Stress, Psychological - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Early life events are studied as potential causes of cancer. The objective here was to study childhood adversities in the etiology of cancer.
The material comprised a population based random sample of 25 898 individuals among the Finnish working-aged population. In 1998 they were requested through six questions in a postal questionnaire to recall their childhood adversities. The cases consisted of people with cancer diagnosed 2000-2006 and registered in the Finnish Cancer Registry (n = 384). The rest of the sample consisted of cancer-free controls.
The most common adversities were prolonged financial difficulties, serious conflicts in the family and someone in the family having been seriously or chronically ill. The cancer patients reported more prolonged financial difficulties and someone seriously or chronically ill in the family. They reported less parental divorce than the controls. The associations were not statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex, education, and health behaviour. Nor was there a significant difference in the total number of childhood adversities between the study group and the controls.
On the whole, these cancer patients had not experienced more childhood adversities than the controls. According to our findings, there is no cause to attribute development of cancer in working age to childhood adversities. This information may also give relief to other family members.
PubMed ID
20121670 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of people living with HIV who use community-based services in Ontario, Canada: implications for service providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171033
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;16(4):50-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter Williams
Lea Narciso
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Robin Weir
Amiram Gafni
Author Affiliation
Ontario AIDS Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;16(4):50-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Chi-Square Distribution
Community Health Services - economics - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - virology
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
HIV Infections - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Health Care Surveys
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Karnofsky Performance Status
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Social Work - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Community-based AIDS service organizations (CBAOs) direct services to multiple-needs people living with HIV/AIDS who are less likely to use mainstream health promotion services. As people live longer with HIV, the potential to enhance quality of life increases, yet little is known about who uses CBAOs or how this use affects other health and social services. This study of people living with AIDS in Ontario, Canada (n = 297) examined the demographic and health-related characteristics of people with AIDS who do and do not use CBAOs and their patterns of mainstream service utilization. It found that users of CBAOs were significantly less healthy, less able to sustain normal activities, and more often depressed. They reported physical disabilities significantly more often. Their quality of life was also lower along certain dimensions. They were significantly poorer and more reliant on government income supports. They consumed significantly more nonhospital health and social services and had significantly higher out-of-pocket costs. These results suggest CBAOs are being accessed appropriately by those most vulnerable. In an effort to strengthen CBAO capacity to recognize and address depression and physical health problems prevalent among their clients, links to other mainstream health promotion and social services is recommended.
PubMed ID
16435530 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.