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An urgent need to improve life conditions of seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140269
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Hebert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Consumer Participation
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatrics - education
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Poverty - prevention & control
Public Policy - trends
Quebec
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In the fall of 2007, the Government of Quebec set up a Public Consultation on Living Conditions of Seniors. Fifty sessions were held in 26 cities across all 17 regions of the province. More than 4000 seniors attended the sessions and 275 briefs were received from scientists and associations. Three themes were identified in the report published in 2008: supporting seniors and their caregivers, reinforcing the place of seniors in society, and preventing problems associated with aging (suicide, abuse, addictions). The main actions that I recommended included: Increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement to prevent poverty; Modifying pension plans and working conditions to allow for progressive retirement; Making a major investment in home care to provide access to services regardless of place of residence; Introducing an Autonomy Support Benefit and autonomy insurance program for financing services to support people with disabilities; Generalizing an Integrated Service Delivery Network providing services to frail older people; Better training for professionals in gerontology. I also recommended setting up a National Policy on Seniors to align all government departments and agencies, municipalities and the private sector around a vision, objectives and a set of actions for improving the integration of seniors in an aging society. This would contribute to a more equitable, interdependent and wiser society. Unfortunately, the Government did not support these recommendations. It is now time for scientists to get involved in leading policy on seniors and in the political arena.
PubMed ID
20922350 View in PubMed
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Baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward poverty: implications for nursing curricula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181772
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2004 Jan;43(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Wendy Sword
Linda Reutter
Donna Meagher-Stewart
Elizabeth Rideout
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, HSc 3N25, Faculty Sciences, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5. sword@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2004 Jan;43(1):13-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Poverty - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Stereotyping
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Given the link between poverty and health, nurses, in their work in hospitals and in the community, often come into contact with people who are poor. To be effective care providers, nurses must have an adequate understanding of poverty and a positive attitude toward people who are poor. This study examined attitudes toward poverty among baccalaureate nursing students (N = 740) at three Canadian universities. Students' attitudes were neutral to slightly positive. Personal experiences appeared to have an important influence on the development of favorable attitudes. The findings point to several considerations for nursing curricula. Students should not only be provided with classroom opportunities for critical exploration of poverty and its negative effects on individuals and society, but also have clinical learning experiences that bring them face-to-face with people who are poor, their health concerns, and the realities of their circumstances. Thoughtful critique of poverty-related issues and interpersonal contact may be effective strategies to foster attitude change.
PubMed ID
14748530 View in PubMed
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The Canadian safety net for the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153541
Source
Soc Secur Bull. 2008;68(2):53-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Michael Wiseman
Martynas Ycas
Author Affiliation
Social Security Administration, Office of Disability and Income Assistance Policy, USA.
Source
Soc Secur Bull. 2008;68(2):53-67
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Government Programs - economics
Humans
Income
Pensions
Poverty - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Public Policy
Retirement - economics
Safety - economics
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Social Security Administration
Abstract
Recently various analysts have called attention to the apparent success of the Canadian social assistance system in reducing poverty among the elderly and have suggested that there may be lessons to be drawn from the Canadian experience that are relevant to the evolution of the U.S. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. This article profiles the Canadian system, compares the system to the U.S. SSI program, reviews the consequences for elderly poverty rates, assesses system costs, and then comments on pertinence of the Canadian experience to SSI policy. The Canadian minimum income guarantee for the elderly is substantially more generous than what is provided by the United States, but it is misleading to claim that the Canadian system costs only "slightly more" than the U.S. program. Such a judgment overlooks a key and costly part of the Canadian system, the Old Age Security demogrant. We estimate the total costs to Canada of providing income support for elderly persons receiving a Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) in 2004 to be approximately C$13.3 billion (roughly US $11.1 billion), slightly more than 1 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) and almost fourteen times the U.S. allocation for SSI and food stamps for elderly SSI recipients. The significance of this commitment is underscored when it is recognized that in 2004 Canadian GDP per capita was just 80 percent of the U.S. level. The Canadian example suggests U.S. policymakers consider better integration of SSI with basic Social Security benefits, experimenting with alternatives to restricting SSI eligibility to individuals with very few assets, and reducing barriers to program access.
PubMed ID
19102138 View in PubMed
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Collaborating toward improving food security in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107695
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Wakegijig
Geraldine Osborne
Sara Statham
Michelle Doucette Issaluk
Author Affiliation
Government of Nunavut Department of Health, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Source
Pages 803-810 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):803-810
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Food Supply - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Nunavut
Poverty - prevention & control
Quality Improvement
Abstract
Community members, Aboriginal organizations, public servants and academics have long been describing a desperate situation of food insecurity in the Eastern Canadian Arctic.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition, a partnership of Inuit Organizations and the Government of Nunavut, is collaborating to develop a territorial food security strategy to address pervasive food insecurity in the context of poverty reduction.
The Nunavut Food Security Coalition has carried out this work using a community consultation model. The research was collected through community visits, stakeholder consultation and member checking at the Nunavut Food Security Symposium.
In this paper, we describe a continuous course of action, based on community engagement and collective action, that has led to sustained political interest in and public mobilization around the issue of food insecurity in Nunavut.
The process described in this article is a unique collaboration between multiple organizations that has led to the development of a sustainable partnership that will inform policy development while representing the voice of Nunavummiut.
Notes
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):137020568912
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):285-30320519090
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-20120737808
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-4017131971
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-1517319085
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-3117319086
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2005 Nov 29;360(1463):2139-4816433099
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):I1-40 following 20015913085
Cites: Ecohealth. 2010 Sep;7(3):361-7320680394
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-5321753059
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
PubMed ID
23984307 View in PubMed
Documents
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Comparing and contrasting poverty reduction performance of social welfare programs across jurisdictions in Canada using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA): an exploratory study of the era of devolution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147154
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2010 Nov;33(4):457-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Nazim N Habibov
Lida Fan
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. nnh@uwindsor.ca
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2010 Nov;33(4):457-67
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Efficiency, Organizational - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Poverty - prevention & control
Program Evaluation - methods
Social Welfare - trends
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
In the mid-1990s, the responsibilities to design, implement, and evaluate social welfare programs were transferred from federal to local jurisdictions in many countries of North America and Europe through devolution processes. Devolution has caused the need for a technique to measure and compare the performances of social welfare programs across multiple jurisdictions. This paper utilizes Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for a comparison of poverty reduction performances of jurisdictional social welfare programs across Canadian provinces. From the theoretical perspective, findings of this paper demonstrates that DEA is a promising method to evaluate, compare, and benchmark poverty reduction performance across multiple jurisdictions using multiple inputs and outputs. This paper demonstrates that DEA generates easy to comprehend composite rankings of provincial performances, identifies appropriate benchmarks for each inefficient province, and estimates sources and amounts of improvement needed to make the provinces efficient. From a practical perspective the empirical results presented in this paper indicate that Newfoundland, Prince Edwards Island, and Alberta achieve better efficiency in poverty reduction than other provinces. Policy makers and social administrators of the ineffective provinces across Canada may find benefit in selecting one of the effective provinces as a benchmark for improving their own performance based on similar size and structure of population, size of the budget for social programs, and traditions with administering particular types of social programs.
PubMed ID
19939448 View in PubMed
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The impact of GMOs on poor countries: a threat to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165165
Source
Riv Biol. 2006 Sep-Dec;99(3):381-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Silvia Francescon
Author Affiliation
United Nations Millennium Campaign.
Source
Riv Biol. 2006 Sep-Dec;99(3):381-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - organization & administration
Conservation of Natural Resources
Developing Countries
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
International Agencies
Malnutrition - prevention & control
National Health Programs
Organisms, Genetically Modified
Poverty - prevention & control
United Nations
World Health
Abstract
The first of the Millennium Development Goals - halve the proportion of people who suffer from hunger by 2015 - is essential for eradicating poverty, as most of the poor live in rural areas. The role of agriculture is, therefore, key to the fight against poverty.Nevertheless, over the last years rich countries diminished their official development assistance for agricultural development and some of them proposed and pushed for a new model of agriculture based on biotechnology. Such a new model of agriculture is presented by its supporters as a means to contribute to the elimination of poverty, as it intends to maximise the crop production.However, it does not take into consideration that policies fighting hunger: need a more comprehensive approach; must take into consideration socio-economic and environmental peculiarities, especially local needs and traditional knowledge and practices. Genetically modified technology goes against these basic requirements, as it is designed to suit multinational enterprises in the North. When drafting development policies, rich and poor countries must bear in mind that the framework of the Millennium Development Goals, to which 189 Nations committed, requires a coherent approach to empower the poor, especially women, and promote traditional knowledge of indigenous people and local communities, as well as ensuring environmental sustainability. The fight to poverty and hunger will not be won and people will still go hungry if the fundamental causes of hunger and food insecurity are not tackled, whereas genetically modified technology is not based on this assumption.
PubMed ID
17299696 View in PubMed
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Individuality and community: the contrasting role of the state in family life in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34881
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Mar;37(1):93-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
S. Scarr
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903, USA.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Mar;37(1):93-102
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Individuality
Infant
Male
Morals
Poverty - prevention & control - psychology
Social Problems - prevention & control - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Values
Social Welfare
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Underlying moral values of individuality versus community and assumptions about what is a "just society" make public policies toward children vastly different in Sweden and the United States. This article explores the origins, cost, and benefits of welfare policies that permit child poverty in the U.S. as a cost of the high value of autonomy/individuality, and policies that prevent child poverty in Sweden, at the cost of economic competitiveness and individual initiative. I conclude that both extremes of moral values have more social costs than benefits but that children should be protected in any nation as the future of the society.
PubMed ID
8900822 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):397
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-2001
Author
E. Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):397
Date
Feb-6-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyl Nitrite - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency Treatment - methods
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nitrous Oxide - adverse effects
Oils, Volatile - adverse effects
Poverty - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Solvents - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Notes
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1999 Nov;25(4):731-4110548445
Cites: Addiction. 1999 Jan;94(1):83-9510665100
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 1998 Jun-Jul;51(1-2):207-149716942
Cites: Addiction. 1994 Aug;89(8):925-397950851
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998 Aug;152(8):781-69701138
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Dec;36(10):735-81790519
PubMed ID
11232151 View in PubMed
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[National program of poverty elimination and health of economically active population in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172114
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;(4):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
I G Nizamov
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;(4):6-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Poverty - prevention & control - trends
Program Evaluation - trends
Public Health - trends
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Effective implementation of actual tasks on social economic development of Russia is certainly determined by significant increasing of health level of laboring people. Death rate of economically active population is an appropriate and highly informative indicator of both population health and society social well-being. Main trend in implementation of program of poverty elimination and in enhancement of national competitive capacity is effective carrying out of public program? Health of laboring population in Russia: 2004 - 2015? with highest possible employers' resource support.
PubMed ID
16273921 View in PubMed
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Poverty, human development, and health in Canada: research, practice, and advocacy dilemmas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149345
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2009 Jun;41(2):7-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009

14 records – page 1 of 2.