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Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108330
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lisa A Serbin
Dale M Stack
Danielle Kingdon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West PY-170, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada. Lisa.Serbin@Concordia.CA
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Educational Measurement
Family
Female
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Models, Statistical
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prospective Studies
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.
PubMed ID
23904002 View in PubMed
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An analysis of trends and determinants of health insurance and healthcare utilisation in the Russian population between 2000 and 2004: the 'inverse care law' in action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151304
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Francesca Perlman
Dina Balabanova
Martin McKee
Author Affiliation
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E7HT, UK. francesca.perlman@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:68
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Research
Humans
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data - trends
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - economics
Private Sector - economics
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Universal Coverage - economics
Abstract
The break-up of the USSR brought considerable disruption to health services in Russia. The uptake of compulsory health insurance rose rapidly after its introduction in 1993. However, by 2000 coverage was still incomplete, especially amongst the disadvantaged. By this time, however, the state health service had become more stable, and the private sector was growing. This paper describes subsequent trends and determinants of healthcare insurance coverage in Russia, and its relationship with health service utilisation, as well as the role of the private sector.
Data were from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, an annual household panel survey (2000-4) from 38 centres across the Russian Federation. Annual trends in insurance coverage were measured (2000-4). Cross-sectional multivariate analyses of the determinants of health insurance and its relationship with health care utilisation were performed in working-age people (18-59 years) using 2004 data.
Between 2000 and 2004, coverage by the compulsory insurance scheme increased from 88% to 94% of adults; however 10% of working-age men remained uninsured. Compulsory health insurance coverage was lower amongst the poor, unemployed, unhealthy and people outside the main cities. The uninsured were less likely to seek medical help for new health problems. 3% of respondents had supplementary (private) insurance, and rising utilisation of private healthcare was greatest amongst the more educated and wealthy.
Despite high population insurance coverage, a multiply disadvantaged uninsured minority remains, with low utilisation of health services. Universal insurance could therefore increase access, and potentially contribute to reducing avoidable healthcare-related mortality. Meanwhile, the socioeconomically advantaged are turning increasingly to a growing private sector.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19397799 View in PubMed
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Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90921
Source
J Addict Dis. 2008;27(4):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Laukkanen Matti
Hakko Helinä
Riala Kaisa
Räsänen Pirkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Addict Dis. 2008;27(4):69-79
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent, Institutionalized - psychology
Child
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Poverty
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support.
PubMed ID
19062350 View in PubMed
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Can universal access to health care eliminate health inequities between children of poor and nonpoor families?: A case study of childhood asthma in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184538
Source
Chest. 2003 Jul;124(1):51-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Don D Sin
Larry W Svenson
Robert L Cowie
S F Paul Man
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Pulmonary Division, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. don.sin@ualberta.ca
Source
Chest. 2003 Jul;124(1):51-6
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Asthma - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Child
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Age
Poverty
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Universal Coverage
Abstract
Children from poor families are much more likely to have emergency visits for asthma than those from nonpoor families, which may be related to financial access barriers to good preventive care for the poor. We sought to determine whether in a health-care system that provides free access to outpatient and hospital services, the disparities in the rates of emergency visits for asthma would be less apparent across the income gradient.
Longitudinal, population-based study.
Alberta, Canada.
All children born in Alberta, Canada between 1985 and 1988 (n = 90,845) were classified into three mutually exclusive groups based on the reported annual income of their parents from the previous year: very poor, poor, and nonpoor groups.
We compared the relative risk (RR) of emergency visits for childhood asthma among children of very poor, poor, and nonpoor families using a Cox proportional hazard model during a 10-year follow-up. We found that the very poor children were 23% more likely to have had an emergency visit for asthma than those from nonpoor families (RR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 1.33), adjusted for a variety of factors. The poor group, however, had a similar risk of asthma emergency visits as the nonpoor group (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.04). The average number of office visits for asthma was similar between the very poor and nonpoor groups.
In a setting of universal access to health care, children of poor and nonpoor families had similar rates of asthma emergency visits; the very poor children, however, continued to experience an excess risk. These findings suggest that a universal health-care system can reduce, but not fully eliminate, the disparities in emergency utilization of asthma across income categories.
PubMed ID
12853501 View in PubMed
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Change in Neighborhood Disadvantage and Change in Smoking Behaviors in Adults: A Longitudinal, Within-individual Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289311
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Anna Pulakka
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Pentti
Ichiro Kawachi
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
From the aFinnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; bDepartment of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; cSchool of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; dDepartment of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; eDepartment of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School, London, United Kingdom; fClinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; and gTurku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Smoking - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Evidence for an association between neighborhood disadvantage and smoking is mixed and mainly based on cross-sectional studies. To shed light on the causality of this association, we examined whether change in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with within-individual change in smoking behaviors.
The study population comprised participants of the Finnish Public Sector study who reported a change in their smoking behavior between surveys in 2008/2009 and 2012/2013. We linked participants' residential addresses to a total population database on neighborhood disadvantage with 250?×?250-m resolution. The outcome variables were changes in smoking status (being a smoker vs. not) as well as the intensity (heavy/moderate vs. light smoker). We used longitudinal case-crossover design, a method that accounts for time-invariant confounders by design. We adjusted models for time-varying covariates.
Of the 3,443 participants, 1,714 quit, while 967 began to smoke between surveys. Smoking intensity increased among 398 and decreased among 364 participants. The level of neighborhood disadvantage changed for 1,078 participants because they moved residence. Increased disadvantage was associated with increased odds of being a smoker (odds ratio of taking up smoking 1.23 [95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.5] per 1 SD increase in standardized national disadvantage score). Odds ratio for being a heavy/moderate (vs. light) smoker was 1.14 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.52) when disadvantage increased by 1 SD.
These within-individual results link an increase in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, due to move in residence, with subsequent smoking behaviors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27337178 View in PubMed
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Child asthma and change in elevated depressive symptoms among mothers of children of a birth cohort from Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132634
Source
Women Health. 2011 Jul 22;51(5):461-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2011
Author
Mai Thanh Tu
Geneviève Perreault
Louise Séguin
Lise Gauvin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Women Health. 2011 Jul 22;51(5):461-81
Date
Jul-22-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Depression, Postpartum - etiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Odds Ratio
Poverty
Pregnancy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors examined the association between maternal reports of child asthma attacks since birth and occurrence of elevated maternal depressive symptoms at seventeen months postpartum in the present study. The modifying role of poverty in this association was also examined. Data from n = 1,696 mother-child dyads from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a birth cohort of children born in 1998, were used. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured with an abridged and validated twelve-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Maternal reports of child asthma attacks since birth in relation to the occurrence of maternal depressive symptoms at 17 months postpartum and the potential modifying role of poverty were tested using multiple logistic regression models. When mothers reported child asthma attacks, those without elevated depressive symptoms at 5 months postpartum had lower odds of elevated depressive symptoms one year later (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1-0.7). Poverty was associated with increased odds of elevated maternal depressive symptoms (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.9), without interacting with child asthma. Through this study, the authors suggest that in mothers without elevated symptoms at 5 months, reported child asthma attacks since birth did not contribute one year later to new occurrence of depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
21797679 View in PubMed
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Child hunger in Canada: results of the 1994 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196717
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2000
Author
L. McIntyre
S K Connor
J. Warren
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. lynn.mcintyre@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 17;163(8):961-5
Date
Oct-17-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Family
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prevalence
Public Assistance
Risk factors
Single-Parent Family
Social Class
Social Welfare
Abstract
In Canada, hunger is believed to be rare. This study examined the prevalence of hunger among Canadian children and the characteristics of, and coping strategies used by, families with children experiencing hunger.
The data originated from the first wave of data collection for the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, conducted in 1994, which included 13,439 randomly selected Canadian families with children aged 11 years or less. The respondents were asked about the child's experience of hunger and consequent use of coping strategies. Sociodemographic and other risk factors for families experiencing hunger, use of food assistance programs and other coping strategies were analyzed by means of multiple logistic regression analysis.
Hunger was experienced by 1.2% (206) of the families in the survey, representing 57,000 Canadian families. Single-parent families, families relying on social assistance and off-reserve Aboriginal families were overrepresented among those experiencing hunger. Hunger coexisted with the mother's poor health and activity limitation and poor child health. Parents offset the needs of their children by depriving themselves of food.
Physicians may wish to use these demographic characteristics to identify and assist families with children potentially at risk for hunger.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11068567 View in PubMed
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Chronic poverty and childhood asthma in the Maritimes versus the rest of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176399
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynn N Lethbridge
Shelley A Phipps
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5. Lynn.Lethbridge@dal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):18-23
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Risk
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine the role of higher long-term poverty rates in the Maritimes as an explanation for higher rates of asthma among children 2-7 years of age.
Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), logistic regressions examine associations between poverty duration and the probability of a child having been diagnosed with asthma, having a current asthma attack or experiencing wheezing in the past 12 months, controlling for other known determinants.
NLSCY data indicate that 15.9% of Maritime children have been diagnosed with asthma, 8.7% have recently had an attack and 24.1% experienced wheezing, statistically higher levels than in the rest of Canada. Children in chronic poverty show rates that are over 30% higher than the Canadian averages. Although 19.9% of Maritime children have been chronically poor compared to 11.7% elsewhere, and although poverty is associated with a higher probability of asthma/wheezing, controlling for poverty status does not eliminate the regional difference in asthma rates. Including other controls with poverty status again does not fully explain the difference.
While these findings do not completely explain why asthma prevalence rates are higher for Maritime children, they do indicate important pathways from poverty to childhood asthma. For example, chronically poor children are more likely to have had low birthweights and are less likely to have been breastfed, both of which are correlates of asthma. Such information can be useful for policy-makers. Pollutants and other environmental factors associated with asthma not included in the study may help further explain regional differences.
PubMed ID
15682688 View in PubMed
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The clustering of severe behavioural, health and educational deficits in Canadian children: preliminary evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200831
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;90(4):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T J Wade
D J Pevalin
A. Brannigan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary. terrance.wade@uc.edu
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;90(4):253-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Educational Status
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
This study identifies a high-risk subpopulation of children with a markedly antisocial behavioural profile in a national sample of Canadian children. We examine a broad array of environmental and child factors that may be associated with this high-risk group. The data are for 18,135 two to eleven year olds in the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. A cluster analysis was performed to identify children possessing extreme antisocial behaviour across five dimensions: aggression, hyperactivity, prosocial behaviour, emotional difficulties and misconduct. Clusters were compared across structural, family, school, neighbourhood, and health covariates. Membership in this severe cluster is associated with material disadvantage across the range of environmental factors as well as significant deficits in child health and education.
PubMed ID
10489723 View in PubMed
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Combining group-based trajectory modeling and propensity score matching for causal inferences in nonexperimental longitudinal data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158343
Source
Dev Psychol. 2008 Mar;44(2):422-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Amelia Haviland
Daniel S Nagin
Paul R Rosenbaum
Richard E Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Rand Corporation, Pittsburg, PA, USA.
Source
Dev Psychol. 2008 Mar;44(2):422-36
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Likelihood Functions
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Models, Statistical
Peer Group
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Risk factors
Social Identification
Socialization
Violence - psychology
Abstract
A central theme of research on human development and psychopathology is whether a therapeutic intervention or a turning-point event, such as a family break-up, alters the trajectory of the behavior under study. This article describes and applies a method for using observational longitudinal data to make more transparent causal inferences about the impact of such events on developmental trajectories. The method combines 2 distinct lines of research: work on the use of finite mixture modeling to analyze developmental trajectories and work on propensity score matching. The propensity scores are used to balance observed covariates and the trajectory groups are used to control pretreatment measures of response. The trajectory groups also aid in characterizing classes of subjects for which no good matches are available. The approach is demonstrated with an analysis of the impact of gang membership on violent delinquency based on data from a large longitudinal study conducted in Montréal, Canada.
PubMed ID
18331133 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.