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Diet quality of Atlantic families headed by single mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170401
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(1):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
N Theresa Glanville
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(1):28-35
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Infant
Male
Mothers
Poverty
Single Parent
Abstract
As part of a larger study on food insecurity and dietary adequacy of low-income lone mothers and their children in Atlantic Canada, we examined diet quality among household members.
Network sampling for 'difficult to sample' populations was used to identify mothers living below the poverty line and alone with at least two children under age 14. Trained dietitians administered 24-hour dietary recalls weekly for one month to mothers on the dietary intake of themselves and their children. We calculated Healthy Eating Index category scores for eligible mothers (129) and children (303) using Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating and the Nutrition Recommendations for Canadians.
Diet quality of low-income lone mothers was poor (35.5%) or in need of improvement (64.5%), with no mother having a good diet. The diet quality of children varied by age, with 22.7% of children aged one to three having a good diet or needing improvement (74.6%), 2.1% of children aged four to eight and no child aged nine to 14 having a good diet, while the diets of about 85% of older children in both age categories needed improvement.
Younger children seem to be protected from poor quality diets in households with limited resources to acquire food.
PubMed ID
16515745 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity of low-income lone mothers and their children in Atlantic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187675
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):411-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynn McIntyre
N Theresa Glanville
Suzanne Officer
Bonnie Anderson
Kim D Raine
Jutta B Dayle
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Professions, 5968 College St., 3rd Fl Burbidge Bldg, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5. Lynn.McIntyre@dal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):411-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Records
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mothers
Poverty
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine the occurrence and predictors of hunger and food insecurity over the past year and month among low-income mother-led households in Atlantic Canada.
The Cornell-Radimer Questionnaire to Estimate the Prevalence of Hunger and Food Insecurity was administered weekly for a month, with modifications, to a community sample of 141 lone mothers who took part in a larger dietary intake study. Eligible women included those living alone with at least two children under the age of 14 years in the four Atlantic Provinces and having an annual income less than or equal to Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off.
Food insecurity over the past year occurred in 96.5% of households. Child hunger was similar to maternal hunger over the one-month study period (23%), however, it was lower than maternal hunger over the past year. On multiple logistic regression analysis, maternal hunger over the past year was predicted by maternal age over 35 years (p
PubMed ID
12448861 View in PubMed
Less detail