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Dental development, dental age and tooth counts. A prospective longitudinal study of Pakistani children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35041
Source
Swed Dent J. 1996;20(1-2):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M A Saleemi
U. Hägg
F. Jalil
S. Zaman
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Paediatrics, K.E.M.C., Lahore, Pakistan.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1996;20(1-2):61-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dentition, Primary
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Pakistan
Poverty Areas
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden
Tooth Eruption - physiology
Urban Population
Abstract
A sample of 443 Pakistani infants from four different socioeconomic areas was followed longitudinally study the emergence of the primary teeth. The mean ages of emergence of the primary teeth, without regard what kind of tooth and dental ages of the primary teeth were calculated. The subjects showed no sexual dimorphism in the emergence times of the primary teeth. The children from poor areas. were ahead by statistically significant differences from upper middle class, for emergence of the primary teeth 17-20. On comparison with Swedish standards (Hägg & Taranger, 1985) Pakistani children are delayed, by a statistically significant difference, in the emergence of primary teeth 1-16, however, they were at par in the emergence of 17-20 primary teeth.
PubMed ID
8738909 View in PubMed
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Family dissolution, family reconstitution, and children's educational careers: recent evidence for Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34292
Source
Demography. 1997 May;34(2):277-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J O Jonsson
M. Gähler
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University. janne@sofi.su.se
Source
Demography. 1997 May;34(2):277-93
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Welfare
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nuclear Family
Poverty
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Single Parent
Social Mobility
Sweden
Abstract
Both longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses on a large and recent Swedish data set demonstrate that, compared to children in intact families, children who have experienced family dissolution or reconstitution show lower educational attainment at age 16. Time constraints do not seem to be an important mechanism behind the negative effect of separation. Economic deprivation affects children's attainment negatively, but downward social mobility appears to be an even more important causal mechanism: Losing the parent with the higher social position probably reduces social capital and aspirations. When we control for socioeconomic characteristics, a small net effect of separation and reconstitution remains.
PubMed ID
9169283 View in PubMed
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Individuality and community: the contrasting role of the state in family life in the United States and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34881
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Mar;37(1):93-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
S. Scarr
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903, USA.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Mar;37(1):93-102
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Individuality
Infant
Male
Morals
Poverty - prevention & control - psychology
Social Problems - prevention & control - psychology
Social Responsibility
Social Values
Social Welfare
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Underlying moral values of individuality versus community and assumptions about what is a "just society" make public policies toward children vastly different in Sweden and the United States. This article explores the origins, cost, and benefits of welfare policies that permit child poverty in the U.S. as a cost of the high value of autonomy/individuality, and policies that prevent child poverty in Sweden, at the cost of economic competitiveness and individual initiative. I conclude that both extremes of moral values have more social costs than benefits but that children should be protected in any nation as the future of the society.
PubMed ID
8900822 View in PubMed
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[Living in poverty undermined health of the graphic artist David Tägström from Falun]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69472
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 May 12;96(19):2387
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-1999
Author
A S Malmborg
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 May 12;96(19):2387
Date
May-12-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Medicine in Art
Paintings - history
Poverty
Sweden
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - history
PubMed ID
10377691 View in PubMed
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Lone mothers in Sweden: trends in health and socioeconomic circumstances, 1979-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72237
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Dec;53(12):750-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
B. Burström
F. Diderichsen
S. Shouls
M. Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Dec;53(12):750-6
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - trends
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Mothers
Poverty - trends
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Single Parent
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To study trends in the health and socioeconomic circumstances of lone mothers in Sweden over the years 1979-1995, and to make comparisons with couple mothers over the same period. DESIGN: Analysis of data from the annual Survey of Living Conditions (ULF), conducted by Statistics Sweden from 1979-1995. Comparison of demographic, socioeconomic and health status of lone and couple mothers and how these have varied over the 17 years of the study. Main outcome measures include prevalence of self perceived general health and limiting longstanding illness. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: All lone mothers (n = 2776) and couple mothers (n = 16,935) aged 16 to 64 years in a random sample of the Swedish population in a series of cross sectional surveys carried out each year between 1979 and 1995. MAIN RESULTS: The socioeconomic conditions of lone mothers deteriorated during the period 1979-1995, with increasing unemployment and poverty rates. Lone mothers had worse health status than couple mothers throughout the period. In comparison with the first two periods, the prevalence of less than good health increased among both lone and couple mothers from the late 1980s onwards. For lone and couple mothers who were poor, their rates of less than good health were similar in the early 1980s, but in 1992-95 poor lone mothers were significantly more likely to report less than good health than poor couple mothers. Unemployed lone mothers had particularly high rates of ill health throughout the study period. CONCLUSIONS: As in other European countries, lone mothers are emerging as a vulnerable group in society in Sweden, especially in the economic climate of the 1990's. While they had very low rates of poverty and high employment rates in the 1980s, their situation has deteriorated with the economic recession of the 1990's. The health status of lone mothers, particularly those who are unemployed or poor, appears worse than that of couple mothers and in some circumstances may be deteriorating. Further study is needed to elucidate the mechanisms mediating their health disadvantage compared with couple mothers.
Notes
Comment In: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Dec;53(12):74910656082
PubMed ID
10656083 View in PubMed
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Patient charges--a hindrance to financially and psychosocially disadvantage groups seeking care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72535
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 May;46(10):1375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
S. Elofsson
A L Undén
I. Krakau
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 May;46(10):1375-80
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medically Uninsured
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty
Primary Health Care - economics - utilization
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
This study examines the extent to which people forego seeking primary health care due to the cost and to investigate the associated demographic, physical, psychological and social factors. In 1995, questionnaires were sent to a random sample of the population in two healthcare regions in the Stockholm area in Sweden covering a total of about 400,000 inhabitants. Among the sample of 8200 people over the age of 17 yr, 69% replied to the questionnaire. About 22% stated that on one or more occasions during the past year they had foregone seeking care due to the cost. About 30% stated that they had foregone or hesitated seeking medical help due to the cost during the past year. This applied to women to a greater extent than men. Not seeking medical care was strongly correlated to a self-assessment of personal finances. Among those who described their financial situation as poor, more than half stated that, on at least one occasion, they had foregone seeking medical care due to the cost. As a consequence, weaker groups in society such as the unemployed, students, foreign nationals and single mothers were overrepresented in this group. Those who had foregone care perceive their health as worse and they had a greater degree of general pains and a higher occurrence of chronic disease/disability compared to those who had not foregone care. Between 1970 and 1995, patient charges for consulting a general practitioner within Stockholm County have increased more than three times faster than the consumer price index. The results suggest that the rapidly increasing patient charges particularly affect the weaker social groups and thus pose a threat to the aim of Swedish healthcare legislation--that good care should be available to everyone on equal terms.
PubMed ID
9665568 View in PubMed
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Perception and acceptance of technological and environmental risks: why are poor countries less concerned?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213786
Source
Risk Anal. 1995 Dec;15(6):733-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
J. Sokolowska
T. Tyszka
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
Source
Risk Anal. 1995 Dec;15(6):733-43
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Attitude
Automobiles
Chemical Industry
Coal
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Economics
Environment
Environmental pollution
Humans
Perception
Poland
Poverty
Power Plants
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk-Taking
Sweden
Technology
Waste management
Waste Products
Abstract
The research has been aimed at answering two questions: (1) What factors impact perception and acceptance of technological and environmental hazards? (2) Why are rich societies involved more in protecting their environment and health than poor societies? Data has been collected from representative samples of two countries--Poland and Sweden. The results indicate that (1) contrary to earlier findings, the inverse relations between perceived benefits and dangers of hazards has not been observed, (2) acceptance of a risk has been mostly influenced by perceived benefits, (3) rejection of a risk has been mostly influenced by its perceived harmful consequences. Concerning the second question, it has been found that: (1) perceived hazard's danger and benefit is not the only factor that impacts its acceptance, and (2) a broader economic context can impact acceptance (tolerance) of hazards. It has been found that being aware of high dangers and not very high benefits of hazardous activities, Poles still have accepted them. Thus, Poles seem to follow an old proverb: "When one does not have what one likes, one has to like what one has."
PubMed ID
8559983 View in PubMed
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Poverty among single elderly women under different systems of old-age security: a comparative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213184
Source
Soc Secur Bull. 1996;59(3):31-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J K Siegenthaler
Source
Soc Secur Bull. 1996;59(3):31-44
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Developed Countries
Female
France
Germany
Humans
Income
Netherlands
Poverty
Single Person
Social Security - economics
Sweden
Switzerland
United States
Women
Abstract
This study takes stock of available comparative research on the economic status of elderly single women in six industrialized countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. A systematic comparison of income has become easier due to such standardized data bases as the Luxembourg Income Study. But an explanation for different poverty rates among older women who are on their own requires a further, differentiated assessment of the countries' retirement benefit structures. This article attempts such a review. It makes use of a variety of single-country sources and takes into account the institutional heterogeneity of old-age security systems. The study concludes with a view of the effectiveness of different old-age security systems in preventing poverty among older single women.
PubMed ID
8994292 View in PubMed
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[Price of the welfare and physicians' role in the debate on sterilization. Strong reactions in the USA to our treatment of "the weak ones in the society"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207040
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Oct 29;94(44):3921-3, 3927-8, 3932
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-29-1997

Resource allocation to health authorities: the quest for an equitable formula in Britain and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207399
Source
BMJ. 1997 Oct 4;315(7112):875-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1997
Author
F. Diderichsen
E. Varde
M. Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1997 Oct 4;315(7112):875-8
Date
Oct-4-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Great Britain
Health Care Costs
Health Care Rationing - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Economic
Poverty
Social Justice
State Medicine - economics - standards
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 1998 Mar 21;316(7135):939-409569405
Comment In: BMJ. 1998 Mar 21;316(7135):9409583913
PubMed ID
9353512 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.