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124 records – page 1 of 13.

The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
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Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
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An assessment of oral health needs of the community served by West Central Community Health Centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216082
Source
Univ Tor Dent J. 1995;9(1):21, 23, 25 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Association between living conditions in childhood and myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37776
Source
BMJ. 1990 Feb 24;300(6723):512-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1990
Author
H. Hasle
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Odense, Denmark.
Source
BMJ. 1990 Feb 24;300(6723):512-3
Date
Feb-24-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Poverty
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
PubMed ID
2107930 View in PubMed
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Associations between community income and cancer survival in Ontario, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200250
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1999 Jul;17(7):2244-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
C. Boyd
J Y Zhang-Salomons
P A Groome
W J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
The Radiation Oncology Research Unit and Departments of Oncology and Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Oncol. 1999 Jul;17(7):2244-55
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Income
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Poverty Areas
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Risk
SEER Program - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to compare the magnitude of the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer survival in the Canadian province of Ontario with that in the United States (U.S.), and (2) to compare cancer survival in communities with similar SES in Ontario and in the U.S.
The Ontario Cancer Registry provided information about all cases of invasive cancer diagnosed in Ontario from 1987 to 1992, and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registry (SEER) provided information about all cases diagnosed in the SEER regions of the U.S. during the same time period. Census data provided information about SES at the community level. The product-limit method was used to describe cause-specific survival. Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the association between SES and the risk of death from cancer.
There were significant associations between SES and survival for most cancer sites in both the U.S. and Ontario, but the magnitude of the association was usually larger in the U.S. In the poorest communities, there were significant survival advantages in favor of cancer patients in Ontario for many disease groups, including cancers of the lung, head and neck region, cervix, and uterus. However, in upper- and middle-income communities, there were significant survival advantages in favor of the U.S. for all cases combined and for several individual diseases, including cancers of the breast, colon and rectum, prostate, and bladder.
The association between SES and cancer survival is weaker in Ontario than it is in the U.S. This is due to a combination of better survival among patients in the poorest communities and worse survival among patients in the wealthier communities of Ontario relative to those in the U.S.
PubMed ID
10561282 View in PubMed
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Better Beginnings, Better Futures: a community-based approach to primary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215593
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R D Peters
Author Affiliation
Better Futures Research Coordination Unit, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):183-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Early Intervention (Education) - economics
Female
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Abstract
Better Beginnings, Better Futures is a 25-year primary prevention policy research demonstration project. Its major purpose is to assess the extent to which community-based primary prevention programs can be effective in preventing emotional, behavioural, physical and cognitive problems in children from economically disadvantaged communities. The project grew out of a number of primary prevention initiatives introduced by the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services (MCSS) since the late 1970s. Eleven sites, four of them located on native reserves, received funding in January, 1991 to establish programs in their communities. From the beginning, a qualitative, naturalistic research approach has been utilized to document and understand the ways in which the programs have developed in the various Better Beginnings communities.
PubMed ID
10151074 View in PubMed
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Bias related to the exclusion of the economically inactive in studies on social class differences in mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200013
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Oct;28(5):899-904
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
P. Martikainen
T. Valkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1999 Oct;28(5):899-904
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Bias (epidemiology)
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Population Surveillance
Poverty
Registries
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess how the exclusion of the economically inactive affects levels and trends in social class differences in mortality among men and women at different durations of follow-up.
Records of the 1970, 1975, 1980 and 1985 censuses on Finnish men and women aged 35-64 linked with records of all deaths during 1971-1990.
Exclusion of the economically inactive population underestimates the class differences in the total population by about 25% among men and 60% among women. The bias does not disappear if the first 5 years of follow-up are excluded and the bias can lead to erroneous conclusions about the trends in social class differences in mortality.
Analyses based on the economically active population may lead to significant underestimation of social class differences in mortality, introduce biases in international comparison and may only partially capture the causal mechanisms underlying these mortality differences. Our results further show that although the bias diminishes during the follow-up, it is by no means eliminated after the first 5 years. The underestimation of social class differences in mortality created by the exclusion of the inactive should be more widely recognized and more accurate data on previous occupations should be collected.
PubMed ID
10597989 View in PubMed
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Canada's poorest citizens: looking for solutions for children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217527
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Aug 15;151(4):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1994
Author
D M Avard
G W Chance
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Aug 15;151(4):419-22
Date
Aug-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Health Services
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Poverty
Notes
Cites: Health Rep. 1989;1(2):137-742491131
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Sep 15;137(6):485-903308037
PubMed ID
8055401 View in PubMed
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Canadians pay for harsh economic policies with their health, physicians warn.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213817
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Dec 1;153(11):1647-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1995
Author
M. OReilly
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Dec 1;153(11):1647-9
Date
Dec-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Economics - trends
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Poverty
Public Policy
Unemployment
Abstract
Canada's fiscal policies are damaging the health of Canadians, two physicians told a conference that examined globalization's impact on the country. Near-record unemployment levels and the recent recession have forced 41% of families in which the parents are 30 or younger to live below the poverty level; more than 21% of Canadian children are also considered to live in poverty. The impact tight fiscal policies have on health and well-being are enormous, say the dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario and the chair of the Canadian Institute of Child Health.
PubMed ID
7489558 View in PubMed
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Children, families and the cycle of disadvantage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225936
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):437-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
L B Schorr
Author Affiliation
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;36(6):437-41
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Family - psychology
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Learning Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Patient care team
Personality Development
Poverty - psychology
Psychosocial Deprivation
Social Support
Abstract
It is possible to reduce rates of school dropout, teenage pregnancy, arrests for violent crime, and long term dependence on welfare. Programs that have improved outcomes among children in disadvantaged families provide access to an array of services cross professional and bureaucratic boundaries, emphasize relationships of trust and respect, are deeply rooted in the community, are family focused, and recognize the distinctive needs of those most at risk. If health, mental health, social service and education programs with these attributes are to reach the large numbers who need them, the systems within which these programs operate must be restructured.
PubMed ID
1933748 View in PubMed
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Children with chronic illness: family and parent demographic characteristics and psychosocial adjustment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226233
Source
Pediatrics. 1991 Jun;87(6):884-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
D. Cadman
P. Rosenbaum
M. Boyle
D R Offord
Author Affiliation
Child Epidemiology Unit, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 1991 Jun;87(6):884-9
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Educational Status
Humans
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Poverty
Psychosocial Deprivation
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This paper presents the results of an epidemiologic study that compares and contrasts psychosocial characteristics of parents and family units of children with chronic illness or physical disability (chronic health problems) with those of healthy children. Data were derived from the Ontario Child Health Study of 1869 randomly selected families, with 3294 children aged 4 to 16 years. In the absence of significant differences between parents and families of children with chronic illness alone and those with physical disability, these groups were combined for analysis, for which odds ratios (OR) or t tests were used. Significant positive findings included increased rates of parental treatment for "nerves" (mothers' OR = 2.1, fathers' OR = 1.9) and increased maternal negative affect scores (Bradburn Affect Balance Scale) (P less than .001) among parents of children with chronic health problems. Important negative findings (95% confidence interval of the OR included 1) included no increase in single-parent families (OR = 1.2), social isolation (OR = 1.0), or alcohol problems (OR = 1.2) among parents of children with chronic health problems. Categorically defined family dysfunction did not differ between the two groups (OR = 1.1). These data contrast with several clinic-based studies and suggest that, in a widely generalizable population survey, families of children with chronic health problems including physical disability do not suffer a marked excess of dysfunction, although some indicators of individual parent psychosocial problems were modestly elevated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2034494 View in PubMed
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124 records – page 1 of 13.