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587 records – page 1 of 59.

A 12-year comparison of common therapeutic interventions in the burn unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153001
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christopher Whitehead
Michael Serghiou
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Services, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas, USA.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;30(2):281-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burn Units - statistics & numerical data
Burns - rehabilitation
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Physical Therapy Modalities
Posture
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular
Skin Transplantation
Splints
United States
Abstract
Although most occupational and physical therapists in an acute burn care setting use similar therapy practices, the time frames at which these therapeutic interventions are carried out vary according to the burn centers' practices. The purpose of this survey was to investigate current trends in burn rehabilitation and compare the results with a similar survey performed in 1994. The survey was designed in a similar fashion to the 1994 survey to ascertain common trends in burn rehabilitation. The survey was sent to 100 randomly selected burn care facilities throughout the United States and Canada. Content included rehabilitation interventions, including evaluation, positioning, splinting, active range of motion, passive range of motion, ambulation, as well as the cross-training of therapists. Significant increases in the percentages of burn centers initiating common therapy practices were found. Positioning (41% increase), active range of motion (48% increase), passive range of motion (52% increase), and ambulation (29% increase) were all found to have increases in the number of burn centers employing these practices in the same time frame. Overall comparison from 1994 to 2006 shows that common therapy techniques are being initiated earlier in the patient's acute burn stay. These results are consistent with recent medical trends of earlier acute discharges and more focus on outpatient rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19165113 View in PubMed
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The ability to reproduce the neutral zero position of the head.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50943
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H W Christensen
N. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic & Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chiropractic - instrumentation
Female
Head
Humans
Male
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rotation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine how precisely asymptomatic subjects can reproduce a neutral zero position of the head. STUDY DESIGN: Repeated measures of the active cervical neutral zero position. SETTING: Institute of Medical Biology (Center of Biomechanics) at Odense University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight asymptomatic students from the University of Odense, male/female ratio 20:18 and mean age 24.3 years (range, 20 to 30 years). INTERVENTION: Measurements of the location of the neutral zero head position by use of the electrogoniometer CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer. Each subject's neutral zero position with eyes closed was measured 3 times. The device gives the localization of the neutral zero as coordinates in 3 dimensions (x, v, z) corresponding to the 3 motion planes. RESULTS: The mean difference from neutral zero in 3 motion planes was found to be 2.7 degrees in the sagittal plane, 1.0 degree in the horizontal plane, and 0.65 degree in the frontal plane. CONCLUSION: We found that young adult asymptomatic subjects are very good at reproducing the neutral zero position of the head. This suggests the existence of some advanced neurologic control mechanisms.
PubMed ID
10029946 View in PubMed
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Accidental falls and related fractures in 65-74 year olds: a retrospective study of 332 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198241
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
E. Nordell
G B Jarnlo
C. Jetsén
L. Nordström
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. eva.nordell@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Documentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Postural Balance
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated, by studying medical records, background factors and consequences of accidental falls of patients 65-74 years who attended the Department of Orthopedics' emergency clinic in Lund. We also assessed possible prevention measures. Fractures occurred in three quarters of the registered falls. Women were more prone to sustain fractures than men. Forearm fractures were commonest among women while hip fractures were commonest among men. One third of the patients were admitted to an orthopedic ward because of the fall. The patients who were less healthy had sustained fractures oftener and also needed more hospital care. Information regarding risk factors for falls and fractures were often missing in the patients' medical records. Impaired walking and balance, and medication increased the risk of falls. Such patients constitute a high risk group for future falls and fractures. A newly developed instrument is suggested as a routine in the emergency department to increase the awareness of risk factors for falls in the elderly. Satisfactory documentation is a prerequisite for further treatment and referrals to prevent falls and fractures.
PubMed ID
10852324 View in PubMed
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[Achieving the optimal functional state in younger schoolchildren by alternating their posture in the classroom]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38363
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Nov;(11):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

Acute biomechanical responses to a prolonged standing exposure in a simulated occupational setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141293
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Erika Nelson-Wong
Samuel J Howarth
Jack P Callaghan
Author Affiliation
Regis University, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomechanical Phenomena - physiology
Electromyography - instrumentation - methods
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - etiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Ontario
Postural Balance - physiology
Posture - physiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prolonged occupational standing has previously been associated with low back pain (LBP) development. The immediate effects of a bout of prolonged standing on subsequent functional movement performance have not been investigated. It is possible that including a period of prolonged standing may have acute, detrimental effects. The purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of a prolonged standing exposure on biomechanical profiles (trunk muscle activation, joint stiffness and kinematics) during three functional movements. A total of 23 volunteers without history of LBP performed lumbar flexion, single-leg stance and unloaded squat movements pre- and post 2 h of standing exposure. It was found that 40% of the participants developed LBP during the standing exposure. There was a decrease in vertebral joint rotation stiffness in lateral bending and increased centre of pressure excursion during unilateral stance following standing exposure. There may be adverse effects to prolonged standing if followed by activities requiring precise balance or resistance of side loads. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Prolonged standing may result in decreases in balance reactions during narrow base conditions as well as in the capacity to effectively resist side-loads at the trunk. Consideration should be given when prolonged standing is included in the workplace.
PubMed ID
20737337 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a seated postural control measure for adult wheelchair users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173363
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2005
Author
Brigitte Gagnon
Claude Vincent
Luc Noreau
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. claude.vincent@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Date
Aug-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Mechanics
Posture - physiology
Quality of Life
Quebec
Wheelchairs - standards
Abstract
Clinical measures of seated postural control in adults are not standardized and most are derived from in-house tools. The purpose of this study is to adapt a pediatric instrument to evaluate seated postural control in adult wheelchair users.
The new instrument is called the Seated Postural Control Measure for Adults (SPCMA) 1.0. Five preliminary versions were pretested with some 20 adults by two raters and a group of experts.
This instrument comprises three sections: Section 1, level of sitting scale for adults (1 item, 7-point ordinal scale); Section 2, static postural alignment (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale); and Section 3, postural alignment after a dynamic activity, propulsion of the wheelchair on flat terrain and an incline (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale).
The SPCMA for Adults 1.0 improves the quality and uniformity of evaluations done by different raters, which facilitates more rigorous follow-up of clients over time, communication between professionals, and objective verification of the attainment of intervention objectives.
PubMed ID
16096248 View in PubMed
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The adolescent back. A field survey of 370 Finnish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241274
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1984;315:1-122
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J J Salminen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1984;315:1-122
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Back - anatomy & histology - physiology
Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Muscles - anatomy & histology - physiology
Neck Muscles - physiology
Physical Examination
Posture
School Health Services
Spine - anatomy & histology - physiology
Abstract
In this study, dealing with the early diagnosis and prevention of back pains, adolescent postural faults especially in the sagittal plane were examined with a standardized physical examination technique suitable for use in schools; the strength and flexibility of muscles affecting the back were investigated; neck and/or back symptoms were screened; and the association of background factors and the findings of the physical examination with symptoms was evaluated. The material consisted of a total of 370 11, 13, 15 and 17-year-old comprehensive and senior secondary school pupils from a small suburban municipality, selected by random sampling. The subjects were quite evenly distributed in terms of different age and sex groups. The physical examination of the back, with evaluation of symptoms, took place in the autumn of 1981 in the premises of school health care, and 58 of the examined subjects were referred on the basis of symptoms and/or findings to an X-ray examination of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine. The X-rays were taken in the spring of 1982. 1 Back pain history. Relation between present neck and/or back symptoms, background variables and findings in physical examination. 7.6% of the subjects reported previous neck and/or back symptoms that had interfered with their school work or leisure activities. Present, mainly mild neck and/or back symptoms were reported by 19.7%. Girls reported symptoms more often than boys (p less than 0.05), and the occurrence of symptoms increased with age (p less than 0.001). Roughly one third of the subjects had frequent symptoms. Pains were most often localized in the low back (p less than 0.001) and were most frequently associated with sitting or physical activities. Most subjects who had suffered from previous symptoms also reported symptoms at the time of the study. These more chronically symptomatic subjects accounted for 6.2% of the total material. 2.9% of siblings under 11 years, 8.0% of siblings 11-17 years, and 13.7% of siblings over 17 years of age had at some time prior to the study complained of recurrent neck and/or back symptoms. Of mothers, 19.0% and of fathers, 15.4% reported neck and/or back symptoms that were continual and/or reduced working ability. The mother (p less than 0.01) and/or the father (p less than 0.05) of a subject reporting frequent symptoms, also reported neck and/or back symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6241979 View in PubMed
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[Age and constitutional features in the forming of posture in children 7 to 14 years of age].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186324
Source
Morfologiia. 2000;118(4):87-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
R V Tambovtseva
T V Panasiuk
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Muscular Activity Physiology, Institute of Age Physiology, RAS, Department of Anatomy and Sport Morphology, Russian State Academy of Physical Culture, Moscow.
Source
Morfologiia. 2000;118(4):87-90
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Humans
Kyphosis - pathology
Longitudinal Studies
Lordosis - pathology
Male
Moscow
Posture
Sex Factors
Somatotypes
Urban Population
Abstract
Longitudinal study of forming of the posture was performed in 138 healthy pupils of Moscow school No. 710 aged from 6.5 to 14 of both sexes. Simultaneously children were examined anthropometrically and their constitution was determined after Schtefko. The posture was examined visually. It was established that posture forms within observation terms depending on sex, age and somatotype. Peak age for the risk of posture disturbance is 9-11 for girls and 10-12 for boys. Digestive and muscular somatotypes provide favourable prognosis respective to posture (in girls), while astenoid somatotype is the worst. Special type of posture defect is characteristic for each somatotype. In children with digestive and muscular somatotype primary posture defects disappear by 12-14. In children with astenoid and thoracal somatotype their number, in contrary, grows.
PubMed ID
12629816 View in PubMed
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[Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117718
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu G Solonin
E R Boiko
A L Markov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - analysis
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Heart Function Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Population Dynamics
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Russia - epidemiology
Testosterone - analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years.
PubMed ID
24738254 View in PubMed
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587 records – page 1 of 59.