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180 records – page 1 of 18.

Accidental falls and related fractures in 65-74 year olds: a retrospective study of 332 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198241
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
E. Nordell
G B Jarnlo
C. Jetsén
L. Nordström
K G Thorngren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. eva.nordell@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Apr;71(2):175-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Documentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Postural Balance
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated, by studying medical records, background factors and consequences of accidental falls of patients 65-74 years who attended the Department of Orthopedics' emergency clinic in Lund. We also assessed possible prevention measures. Fractures occurred in three quarters of the registered falls. Women were more prone to sustain fractures than men. Forearm fractures were commonest among women while hip fractures were commonest among men. One third of the patients were admitted to an orthopedic ward because of the fall. The patients who were less healthy had sustained fractures oftener and also needed more hospital care. Information regarding risk factors for falls and fractures were often missing in the patients' medical records. Impaired walking and balance, and medication increased the risk of falls. Such patients constitute a high risk group for future falls and fractures. A newly developed instrument is suggested as a routine in the emergency department to increase the awareness of risk factors for falls in the elderly. Satisfactory documentation is a prerequisite for further treatment and referrals to prevent falls and fractures.
PubMed ID
10852324 View in PubMed
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Acute biomechanical responses to a prolonged standing exposure in a simulated occupational setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141293
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Erika Nelson-Wong
Samuel J Howarth
Jack P Callaghan
Author Affiliation
Regis University, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomechanical Phenomena - physiology
Electromyography - instrumentation - methods
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - etiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Ontario
Postural Balance - physiology
Posture - physiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prolonged occupational standing has previously been associated with low back pain (LBP) development. The immediate effects of a bout of prolonged standing on subsequent functional movement performance have not been investigated. It is possible that including a period of prolonged standing may have acute, detrimental effects. The purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of a prolonged standing exposure on biomechanical profiles (trunk muscle activation, joint stiffness and kinematics) during three functional movements. A total of 23 volunteers without history of LBP performed lumbar flexion, single-leg stance and unloaded squat movements pre- and post 2 h of standing exposure. It was found that 40% of the participants developed LBP during the standing exposure. There was a decrease in vertebral joint rotation stiffness in lateral bending and increased centre of pressure excursion during unilateral stance following standing exposure. There may be adverse effects to prolonged standing if followed by activities requiring precise balance or resistance of side loads. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Prolonged standing may result in decreases in balance reactions during narrow base conditions as well as in the capacity to effectively resist side-loads at the trunk. Consideration should be given when prolonged standing is included in the workplace.
PubMed ID
20737337 View in PubMed
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[Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117718
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu G Solonin
E R Boiko
A L Markov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - analysis
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Heart Function Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Population Dynamics
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Russia - epidemiology
Testosterone - analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years.
PubMed ID
24738254 View in PubMed
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Application of a fall screening algorithm stratified fall risk but missed preventive opportunities in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133305
Source
J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2010 Oct-Dec;33(4):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susan W Muir
Katherine Berg
Bert Chesworth
Neil Klar
Mark Speechley
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. susanw.muir@uwo.ca
Source
J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2010 Oct-Dec;33(4):165-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Female
Gait
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Ontario
Postural Balance
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Evaluate the ability of the American and British Geriatrics Society fall prevention guideline's screening algorithm to identify and stratify future fall risk in community-dwelling older adults.
Prospective cohort of community-dwelling older adults (n = 117) aged 65 to 90 years. Fall history, balance, and gait measured during a comprehensive geriatric assessment at baseline. Falls data were collected monthly for 1 year. The outcomes of any fall and any injurious fall were evaluated.
The algorithm stratified participants into 4 hierarchal risk categories. Fall risk was 33% and 68% for the "no intervention" and "comprehensive fall evaluation required" groups respectively. The relative risk estimate for falling comparing participants in the 2 intervention groups was 2.08 (95% CI 1.42-3.05) for any fall and 2.60 (95% Cl 1.53-4.42) for any injurious fall. Prognostic accuracy values were: sensitivity of 0.50 (95% Cl 0.36-0.64) and specificity of 0.82 (95% CI 0.70-0.90) for any fall; and sensitivity of 0.56 (95% CI 0.38-0.72) and specificity of 0.78 (95% Cl 0.67-0.86) for any injurious fall.
The algorithm was able to identify and stratify fall risk for each fall outcome, though the values of prognostic accuracy demonstrate moderate clinical utility. The recommendations of fall evaluation for individuals in the highest risk groups appear supported though the recommendation of no intervention in the lowest risk groups may not address their needs for fall prevention interventions. Further evaluation of the algorithm is recommended to refine the identification of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults.
PubMed ID
21717920 View in PubMed
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Artificial neural networks and center-of-pressure modeling: a practical method for sensorimotor-degradation assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179533
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2004 Jan;12(1):75-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Gongbing Shan
Dayna Daniels
Rongri Gu
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2004 Jan;12(1):75-89
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Alberta
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Computer simulation
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Neural Networks (Computer)
Postural Balance - physiology
Proprioception - physiology
Somatosensory Disorders - ethnology - physiopathology
Tai Ji
Abstract
Numerous methods for studying the prevention of falls and age-related sensorimotor degradation have been proposed and tested. Some approaches are too impractical to use with seniors or too expensive for practitioners. Practitioners desire a simple, reliable technique. The goals of this research were to develop such an approach and to apply it in exploring the effect of Tai Chi on age-related sensorimotor degradation. The method employed artificial-neural-network (ANN) models trained by using individuals' center-of-pressure (COP) measurements and age. Ninety-six White and Chinese adults without Tai Chi training were tested. In contrast, a third group, Chinese seniors with Tai Chi training, was tested to ascertain any influence from Tai Chi on sensorimotor aging. This study supported ANN technology with COP data as a feasible tool in the exploration of sensorimotor degradation and demonstrated that Tai Chi slowed down the effects of sensorimotor aging.
PubMed ID
15211022 View in PubMed
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Association between changes in habitual physical activity and changes in bone density, muscle strength, and functional performance in elderly men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91213
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Daly Robin M
Ahlborg Henrik G
Ringsberg Karin
Gardsell Per
Sernbo Ingemar
Karlsson Magnus K
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Western Hospital, Footscray, Melbourne, Australia. rdaly@unimelb.edu.au
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2252-60
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Gait
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Strength - physiology
Postural Balance
Prospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the long-term effects of habitual physical activity on changes in musculoskeletal health, functional performance, and fracture risk in elderly men and women. DESIGN: Ten-year prospective population-based study. SETTING: Malmö-Sjöbo Prospective Study, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 152 men and 206 women aged 50, 60, 70, and 80 who were followed for 10 years. MEASUREMENTS: Distal radius bone mineral density (BMD) (single photon absorptiometry), upper limb muscle (grip) strength, balance, gait velocity, occupational and leisure-time activity, and fractures (interview-administered questionnaire) were reassessed after 10 years. Annual changes for all measures were compared between participants with varying habitual physical activity histories at baseline and follow-up: inactive-inactive (n=202), active-inactive (n=47), inactive-active (n=49), and active-active (n=60). Data for men and women were pooled, because there were no sex-by-activity group interactions. To detect possible differences in fracture incidence between the varying habitual activity groups, participants were classified into two activity groups based on their activity classification at baseline and follow-up: inactive:less active versus active:more active. RESULTS: The annual rate of bone loss was 0.6% per year less in individuals classified as active at both time points than in those classified as inactive at both time points (P
PubMed ID
19016934 View in PubMed
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Association between functional capacity tests and fractures: an eight-year prospective population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159075
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Aug;19(8):1203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
M. Kärkkäinen
T. Rikkonen
H. Kröger
J. Sirola
M. Tuppurainen
K. Salovaara
J. Arokoski
J. Jurvelin
R. Honkanen
E. Alhava
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, Mediteknia Building, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. Matti.Karkkainen@uku.fi
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Aug;19(8):1203-10
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Hand Strength
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Postmenopause - physiology
Postural Balance
Prognosis
Walking
Abstract
This study of postmenopausal women (n=2,928) with an eight-year follow-up revealed that impairment in functional status associated with the increased fracture risk. The standing-on-one-foot and grip strength tests and a question about self-assessed ability to move can be used to identify women with a high risk of suffering a fracture.
Poor functional status has pointed to associate with injurious falls and consequent fractures. Our aim was to define association between functional capacity and fractures.
This study was based on the Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE). A total of 2,928 postmenopausal women took part in the functional capacity and muscle strength tests. The duration of fracture follow-up varied from 6.43 to 9.86 (mean 8.37) years and the first fracture was the end-point event for the statistical analyses. All analyses were done with Cox-regression.
A total of 261 end-point fractures occurred. In multivariate analysis the inability to stand-on-one-foot for 10 seconds increased the risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio with 95% CI) 9.11-fold (1.98-42.00). Decreased grip strength associated with 1.05-fold (1.01-1.09) increased risk of hip fractures. Low leg extension strength associated with 1.02-fold (1.00-1.03) higher risk for all fractures. The self-assessed ability to walk less than 100 meters at baseline increased the risk of ankle 2.36-fold (1.10-5.08), hip 11.57-fold (2.73-49.15) and clinical vertebral fractures 3.85-fold (1.45-10.22).
According to these results the standing-on-one-foot less than 10 seconds, grip strength and a question about ability to walk less than 100 meters may help to predict postmenopausal fractures.
PubMed ID
18236100 View in PubMed
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Associations of sensory-motor functions with poor mobility in 75- and 80-year-old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205548
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1998 Jun;30(2):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
R. Sakari-Rantala
P. Era
T. Rantanen
E. Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1998 Jun;30(2):121-7
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Sex Factors
Walking
Abstract
This study investigated the associations of sensory-motor functions with mobility in elderly people. All 75- and 80-year-old residents of the city of Jyväskylä, Finland, were invited to take part in the study. A total of 617 (93%) persons were interviewed, and 500 (75%) took part in laboratory examinations. Self-reported mobility was recorded during the interview. Basic mobility functions (maximal walking speed and stair-mounting ability) and sensory-motor functions (maximal isometric muscle strength, standing balance, reaction time and visual acuity) were measured in the laboratory. Multivariate analyses showed that poor sensory-motor functions were significantly associated with poor performance in basic mobility functions and that poor performance in basic mobility functions was associated with self-reported disability in mobility. The associations discovered were consistent with models of the disablement process. Muscle strength, balance, reaction time and vision all have individual significance for mobility, underlining the need for multifactorial approaches in prevention and rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
9606775 View in PubMed
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Baby swimming: exploring the effects of early intervention on subsequent motor abilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148818
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2010 May;36(3):428-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
H. Sigmundsson
B. Hopkins
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. hermundurs@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2010 May;36(3):428-30
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development - physiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Motor Skills - physiology
Postural Balance - physiology
Questionnaires
Swimming - physiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the effects of baby swimming on subsequent motor abilities.
A range of motor abilities was examined in 4-year-old children who had previously participated in a programme of baby swimming (n= 19) and compared with a matched group of coevals who had not had this experience (n= 19).
As predicted from the nature of the exercises that comprise the programme, the effects of baby swimming were restricted to abilities associated with prehension and balance.
Suggestions are made as to how the theme of this hypothesis-generating, demonstration study can be pursued in the future with more rigorous experimental controls and applications to children with disabilities and impairments.
PubMed ID
19719766 View in PubMed
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Balance abilities of different-aged workers in physically demanding jobs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186460
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2003 Mar;13(1):33-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Anne Punakallio
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anne.punakallio@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2003 Mar;13(1):33-43
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Occupations
Physical Exertion - physiology
Postural Balance - physiology
Posture - physiology
Sex Factors
Task Performance and Analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload
Abstract
The postural and functional balance abilities of workers in physically demanding jobs were assessed in relation to age and occupation. Postural balance was tested with a force platform, and functional balance was measured during walking on a wooden plank. The subjects, 23-61 years of age, were fire fighters (men, n = 69), construction workers (men, n = 52), nursing staff (women, n = 51), and home care workers (women, n = 66). In the older (> or = 50 years) groups the time used for the functional balance test was 3-5 s longer and the velocity moment of the postural balance was 16-30 mm2/s higher than in the groups aged
PubMed ID
12611029 View in PubMed
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180 records – page 1 of 18.