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Acarbose treatment and the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: the STOP-NIDDM trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47380
Source
JAMA. 2003 Jul 23;290(4):486-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2003
Author
Jean-Louis Chiasson
Robert G Josse
Ramon Gomis
Markolf Hanefeld
Avraham Karasik
Markku Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu and Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
JAMA. 2003 Jul 23;290(4):486-94
Date
Jul-23-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
alpha-Glucosidases - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
CONTEXT: The worldwide explosive increase in type 2 diabetes mellitus and its cardiovascular morbidity are becoming major health concerns. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia with acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, on the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: International, multicenter double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, undertaken in hospitals in Canada, Germany, Austria, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Israel, and Spain from July 1998 through August 2001. A total of 1429 patients with IGT were randomized with 61 patients (4%) excluded because they did not have IGT or had no postrandomization data, leaving 1368 patients for a modified intent-to-treat analysis. Both men (49%) and women (51%) participated with a mean (SD) age of 54.5 (7.9) years and body mass index of 30.9 (4.2). These patients were followed up for a mean (SD) of 3.3 (1.2) years. INTERVENTION: Patients with IGT were randomized to receive either placebo (n = 715) or 100 mg of acarbose 3 times a day (n = 714). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The development of major cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease, cardiovascular death, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular event, and peripheral vascular disease) and hypertension (> or =140/90 mm Hg). RESULTS: Three hundred forty-one patients (24%) discontinued their participation prematurely, 211 in the acarbose-treated group and 130 in the placebo group; these patients were also followed up for outcome parameters. Decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia with acarbose was associated with a 49% relative risk reduction in the development of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.28-0.95; P =.03) and a 2.5% absolute risk reduction. Among cardiovascular events, the major reduction was in the risk of myocardial infarction (HR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01-0.72; P =.02). Acarbose was also associated with a 34% relative risk reduction in the incidence of new cases of hypertension (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49-0.89; P =.006) and a 5.3% absolute risk reduction. Even after adjusting for major risk factors, the reduction in the risk of cardiovascular events (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24-0.90; P =.02) and hypertension (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.45-0.86; P =.004) associated with acarbose treatment was still statistically significant. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that treating IGT patients with acarbose is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2004 Jan-Feb;140(1):214711273
Comment In: Curr Diab Rep. 2004 Feb;4(1):1114764272
Comment In: JAMA. 2003 Dec 17;290(23):3066-7; author reply 3067-914679261
Comment In: JAMA. 2003 Dec 17;290(23):3066; author reply 3067-914679262
Comment In: JAMA. 2003 Dec 17;290(23):3066; author reply 3067-914679260
Comment In: JAMA. 2003 Dec 17;290(23):3067; author reply 3067-914679263
PubMed ID
12876091 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120287
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
N T Gregersen
A. Belza
M G Jensen
C. Ritz
C. Bitz
O. Hels
E. Frandsen
D J Mela
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appetite Regulation
Armoracia - chemistry
Black Pepper - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Ginger - chemistry
Humans
Hyperphagia - prevention & control
Lunch
Male
Mustard Plant - chemistry
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Spices - adverse effects
Thermogenesis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.
PubMed ID
23021155 View in PubMed
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Altering source or amount of dietary carbohydrate has acute and chronic effects on postprandial glucose and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes: Canadian trial of Carbohydrates in Diabetes (CCD).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126372
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):227-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
T M S Wolever
A L Gibbs
J-L Chiasson
P W Connelly
R G Josse
L A Leiter
P. Maheux
R. Rabasa-Lhoret
N W Rodger
E A Ryan
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. thomas.wolever@utoronto.ca
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Mar;23(3):227-34
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diet therapy
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood
Female
Glycemic Index
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Nutrition recommendations for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are partly guided by the postprandial responses elicited by diets varying in carbohydrate (CHO). We aimed to explore whether long-term changes in postprandial responses on low-glycemic-index (GI) or low-CHO diets were due to acute or chronic effects in T2DM.
Subjects with diet-alone-treated T2DM were randomly assigned to high-CHO/high-GI (H), high-CHO/low-GI (L), or low-CHO/high-monounsaturated-fat (M) diets for 12-months. At week-0 (Baseline) postprandial responses after H-meals (55% CHO, GI = 61) were measured from 0800 h to 1600 h. After 12 mo subjects were randomly assigned to H-meals or study diet meals (L, 57% CHO, GI = 50; M, 44% CHO, GI = 61). This yielded 5 groups: H diet with H-meals (HH, n = 34); L diet with H- (LH, n = 17) or L-meals (LL, n = 16); and M diet with H- (MH, n = 18) or M meals (MM, n = 19). Postprandial glucose fluctuations were lower in LL than all other groups (p
PubMed ID
22397878 View in PubMed
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The apolipoprotein CI content of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins independently predicts early atherosclerosis in healthy middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53177
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Apr 5;45(7):1013-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2005
Author
Anders Hamsten
Angela Silveira
Susanna Boquist
Rong Tang
M Gene Bond
Ulf de Faire
Johan Björkegren
Author Affiliation
Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustaf V Research Institute, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, 171-76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Apr 5;45(7):1013-7
Date
Apr-5-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apolipoproteins - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Carotid Artery, Common - ultrasonography
Carotid Stenosis - blood - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - blood - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Humans
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, VLDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Predictive value of tests
Proinsulin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: In this study, we examined the apolipoprotein (apo) CI content of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) in relation to established coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and early atherosclerosis. BACKGROUND: In Western society, the postprandial state constitutes a nearly constant stress on the vasculature and the metabolism of lipoproteins. Delayed clearance of postprandial TRL remnants has repeatedly been associated with premature CHD and may include the enrichment of these remnants with apoCI. METHODS: We examined 72 healthy 50-year-old men with an apoE3/E3 genotype who had undergone an oral fat load test and B-mode ultrasound examination of the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery. RESULTS: In the fasting state, plasma, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, proinsulin, and apoB100-containing intermediate density lipoprotein levels were related to IMT (p
PubMed ID
15808756 View in PubMed
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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116740
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Bread
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fragaria
Fruit
Humans
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Photinia
Postprandial Period - physiology
Ribes
Secale cereale
Single-Blind Method
Starch - administration & dosage
Triticum
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Vaccinium myrtillus
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Abstract
Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.
PubMed ID
23365108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272480
Source
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2016 Jan 1;310(1):G43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Simon Veedfald
Astrid Plamboeck
Carolyn F Deacon
Bolette Hartmann
Filip K Knop
Tina Vilsbøll
Jens J Holst
Source
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2016 Jan 1;310(1):G43-51
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Denmark
Eating
Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide - blood - secretion
Ghrelin - blood - secretion
Glucagon - blood - secretion
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood - secretion
Glucose Clamp Technique
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Insulin - blood - secretion
Intestinal Secretions - metabolism - secretion
Intestines - innervation - metabolism
Male
Muscarinic Antagonists - pharmacology
Pancreas - metabolism - secretion
Pancreatic Polypeptide - blood - secretion
Postprandial Period
Time Factors
Vagus Nerve - drug effects - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); HbA1c: 5.1 ± 0.1%/31.4 ± 0.5 mmol/mol). Cephalic activation was elicited by modified sham feeding (MSF, aka "chew and spit") with or without atropine (1 mg bolus 45 min before MSF + 80 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 2 h). To mimic incipient prandial glucose excursions, glucose levels were clamped at 6 mmol/l on all days. The meal stimulus for the MSF consisted of an appetizing breakfast. Participants (9/10) also had a 6 mmol/l glucose clamp without MSF. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels rose from 6.3 ± 1.1 to 19.9 ± 6.8 pmol/l (means ± SE) in response to MSF and atropine lowered basal PP levels and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min on the atropine (ATR) + clamp (CLA) + MSF compared with the saline (SAL) + CLA and SAL + CLA + MSF days; baseline-subtracted glucagon levels were -10.7 ± 1.1 vs. -4.0 ± 1.1 and -4.7 ± 1.9 pmol/l (means ± SE), P
PubMed ID
26492921 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in serum lipids and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations after consumption of beverages with beta-glucans from oats or barley: a randomised dose-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173861
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;59(11):1272-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Biörklund
A. van Rees
R P Mensink
G. Onning
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Nutrition, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov;59(11):1272-81
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Avena sativa
Beverages
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Food, Fortified
Hordeum
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - diet therapy
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Phytotherapy - methods
Postprandial Period - drug effects
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
beta-Glucans - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
To investigate side by side the effects on serum lipoproteins and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations of beverages enriched with 5 or 10 g of beta-glucans from oats or barley.
An 8-week single blind, controlled study with five parallel groups carried out at two centres under identical conditions.
A total of 100 free-living hypercholesterolaemic subjects were recruited locally and 89 completed the study.
During a 3-week run-in period all subjects consumed a control beverage. For the following 5-week period four groups received a beverage with 5 or 10 g beta-glucans from oats or barley and one group continued with the control beverage. Blood samples in weeks 0, 2, 3, 7 and 8 were analysed for serum lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin. Postprandial concentrations of glucose and insulin were compared between control and the beverage with 5 g of beta-glucans from oats or barley.
Compared to control, 5 g of beta-glucans from oats significantly lowered total-cholesterol by 7.4% (P
PubMed ID
16015250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of buckwheat modulates the post-prandial response of selected gastrointestinal satiety hormones in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115631
Source
Metabolism. 2013 Jul;62(7):1021-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Danielle M Stringer
Carla G Taylor
Paulyn Appah
Heather Blewett
Peter Zahradka
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Metabolism. 2013 Jul;62(7):1021-31
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Canada
Cross-Over Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - diet therapy
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Fagopyrum - chemistry
Female
Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide - blood - secretion
Gastrointestinal Tract - secretion
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood - secretion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oryza sativa - chemistry
Overweight - complications
Postprandial Period
Satiety Response
Seeds - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
In healthy participants and those with diet-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM), to (1) compare the acute 3-hour post-prandial response of glucose, insulin and other gastrointestinal hormones known to influence food intake and glucose metabolism after consumption of a food product made from whole grain buckwheat flour versus rice flour; (2) determine the effect of daily consumption of a food product made from whole grain buckwheat flour on fasting glucose, lipids and apolipoproteins.
Healthy participants or those with T2DM consumed either buckwheat or rice crackers. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180minutes after consumption. In a second phase of the study, participants consumed one serving of buckwheat crackers daily for 1week; fasting blood samples from day 1 and day 7 were analyzed.
Post-prandial plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and pancreatic polypeptide were altered after consuming buckwheat versus rice crackers. Interestingly, changes in these hormones did not lead to changes in post-prandial glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations. Significant correlations were observed between both fasting concentrations and post-prandial responses of several of the hormones examined. Interestingly, certain correlations were present only in the healthy participant group or the T2DM group. There was no effect of consuming buckwheat for one week on fasting glucose, lipids or apolipoproteins in either the healthy participants or those with T2DM.
Although the buckwheat cracker did not modify acute glycemia or insulinemia, it was sufficient to modulate gastrointestinal satiety hormones.
PubMed ID
23485142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in young, healthy obese subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281239
Source
Clin Obes. 2015 Dec;5(6):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
M A Larsen
R. Goll
S. Lekahl
O S Moen
J. Florholmen
Source
Clin Obes. 2015 Dec;5(6):349-57
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
Chylomicrons - chemistry
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Norway
Obesity - blood - complications - physiopathology
Postprandial Period
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Obesity is associated with the metabolic syndrome. The aims were, first, to study the postprandial triglyceride clearance in young, healthy obese subjects and, second, to investigate if fasting triglycerides can predict delayed postprandial triglyceride clearance. Eighteen apparently healthy, obese subjects with no clinical signs of metabolic disturbances participated. Controls were age- and sex-matched, healthy, normal weight subjects. Subclinical markers of metabolic disturbances were assessed by measuring postprandial triglycerides in serum and in chylomicrons by oral fat tolerance test. Postprandial triglyceride clearance for 8?h was assessed indirectly as removal of the lipid from serum during the oral fat tolerance test. Insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Twelve (66%) of the apparently healthy obese individuals had insulin resistance measured by HOMA-IR. There was a delayed clearance of serum triglycerides and chylomicron triglycerides at 6?h when compared with the control group, while, at 8?h, the differences were only detected for the chylomicron triglyceride clearance. Triglyceride response was significantly greater in the obese subjects. Fasting triglycerides in upper normal level predicted a delayed postprandial triglyceride clearance and insulin resistance. In young, apparently healthy obese subjects early metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance and delayed postprandial triglyceride clearance can be detected. Fasting serum triglyceride in upper normal level predicted delayed postprandial triglyceride clearance and insulin resistance.
Notes
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