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Abnormal bleeding associated with preeclampsia: a population study of 315,085 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90728
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eskild Anne
Vatten Lars J
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Uterine Hemorrhage - complications
Abstract
ObjeCTIVE: To study the association of preeclampsia with abnormal bleeding in the first trimester and after delivery. DESIGN: Register-based population study. Setting. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Population. A total of 315,085 women in Norway with singleton deliveries after 21 weeks of gestation (1999-2004). METHODS: We compared frequencies of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester between women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and women without preeclampsia development, and made similar comparisons for postpartum bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women with bleeding. RESULTS: In the first trimester, vaginal bleeding occurred in 1.6% (215/13,166) of subsequent preeclampsia cases, compared to 2.0% (6,112/301,919) of normotensives (p1,500 mL) occurred in 3.0% (399/13,166) of preeclampsia cases and in 1.4% (4,223/301,919) of normotensives (p500 mL) was also more common in preeclampsia cases (22.9% versus 13.9%, p
PubMed ID
19093234 View in PubMed
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Arterial embolization and prophylactic catheterization for the treatment for severe obstetric hemorrhage*.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63147
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Nov;84(11):1075-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Kati Ojala
Jukka Perälä
Juho Kariniemi
Pirjo Ranta
Tytti Raudaskoski
Aydin Tekay
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland. kati.ojala@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Nov;84(11):1075-80
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arteries
Balloon Dilatation - methods
Balloon Occlusion - methods
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation - complications
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Placenta Accreta
Placenta Previa - diagnosis
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology - prevention & control - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Uterine Inertia
Abstract
BACKGROUND. To evaluate indications, efficacy, and complications associated with arterial embolization and prophylactic balloon catheterization in the management of obstetric hemorrhage at a university hospital. METHODS. Twenty-two women underwent arterial embolization between February 2001 and November 2003 for the treatment for primary postpartum hemorrhage resulting from abnormal placentation (n=11), uterine atony (n=7), paravaginal laceration (n=3), and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (n=1). Blood loss was between 3.2 and 15 l. In seven patients, abnormal placentation was diagnosed prenatally and in these patients balloon catheterization was performed prophylactically before elective cesarean section. RESULTS. Of the seven patients, who underwent prophylactic catheterization, embolization was successful in five resulting in adequate hemostasis. Hysterectomy was performed in three, in two patients for uncontrolled hemorrhage and in one patient for placental invasion to bladder. There were no complications associated with prophylactic catheterization and embolization. The other 15 patients were treated in an emergency setting. In eight patients, embolization was performed as a primary surgery, and it was successful in six. In the other seven patients, hysterectomy was performed as an emergency surgery, but bleeding continued. Of these, in six patients, hemostasis was achieved with embolization. Complications associated with emergency embolization were observed in three patients. These were thrombosis of left popliteal artery, vaginal necrosis, and paresthesia of the right leg. CONCLUSIONS. Arterial embolization is of significant value in treating obstetric hemorrhage. Prophylactic insertion of balloon catheters before cesarean section seems to be a safe and effective method in controlling anticipated bleeding. In patients with persistent bleeding following cesarean section and hysterectomy, embolization could be a primary procedure before re-surgery.
PubMed ID
16232175 View in PubMed
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Blood transfusion at delivery and risk of subsequent malignant lymphoma in the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21413
Source
Vox Sang. 1998;75(2):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
H. Anderson
L. Brandt
A. Ericson
H. Olsson
T. Möller
Author Affiliation
Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Harald.Anderson@onk.lu.se
Source
Vox Sang. 1998;75(2):145-8
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Blood transfusion has been shown to be a risk factor for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a cohort of 77,928 women with bleeding complications at delivery in the period of 1973-1986, subsequent NHL cases were identified and the number was compared with the number expected from national incidence rates. In a case-control study the proportion of transfused NHL cases was compared with the proportion of transfused controls. RESULTS: The observed number of NHL in the cohort was 18 versus 22.0 expected. Information on transfusion was obtained for 15 of the NHL cases and none (0%) was transfused versus 32 out of 136 controls (23%). CONCLUSIONS: Blood transfusion at delivery is not a risk factor for NHL. The immune tolerance induced by pregnancy may reduce the risk of NHL associated with the transfusion of allogeneic blood cells.
PubMed ID
9784669 View in PubMed
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[Complications of cesarean deliveries]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98362
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Jan;96(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Heiddis Valgeirsdottir
Hildur Hardardottir
Ragnheidur I Bjarnadottir
Author Affiliation
Laeknadeild Hi, kvennasvioi Landspitala, Simi.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Jan;96(1):37-42
Date
Jan-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Transfusion
Cesarean Section - adverse effects
Extraction, Obstetrical - adverse effects
Female
Fever - etiology
Humans
Iceland
Labor Stage, First
Middle Aged
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology - therapy
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the rate of complications which accompany cesarean sections at Landspitali University Hospital (LSH). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All deliveries by cesarean section from July 1st 2001 to December 31st 2002 were examined in a retrospective manner. Information was collected from maternity records regarding the operation and its complications if they occurred, during or following the operation. RESULTS: During this period 761 women delivered by cesarean section at LSH. The overall complication rate was 35,5%. The most common complications were; blood loss > or =1000 ml (16.5%), post operative fever (12.2%), extension from the uterine incision (7.2%) and need for blood transfusion (4.3%). Blood transfusion was most common in women undergoing cesarean section after attempted instrumental vaginal delivery (20%). Fever and extension from the uterine incision were most common in women undergoing cesarean section after full cervical dilation without attempt of instrumental delivery (19,4%). These complications were least likely to occur if the patient underwent an elective cesarean section. CONCLUSION: Complications following cesarean section are common, especially if labor is advanced. Each indication for an operative delivery should be carefully weighed and the patient informed accordingly.
PubMed ID
20075444 View in PubMed
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Contraindications in planned home birth in Iceland: A retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294539
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Mar; 15:10-17
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Berglind Halfdansdottir
Ingegerd Hildingsson
Alexander Kr Smarason
Herdis Sveinsdottir
Olof A Olafsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirberg, Eiriksgata 34, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: beh6@hi.is.
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2018 Mar; 15:10-17
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Contraindications
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Home Childbirth
Hospitals
Humans
Iceland
Infant health
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric
Maternal health
Midwifery
Parturition
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Icelandic national guidelines on place of birth list contraindications for home birth. Few studies have examined the effect of contraindication on home birth, and none have done so in Iceland. The aim of this study was to examine whether contraindications affect the outcome of planned home birth or have a different effect at home than in hospital.
The study is a retrospective cohort study on the effect of contraindications for home birth on the outcome of planned home (n?=?307) and hospital (n?=?921) birth in 2005-2009. Outcomes were described for four different groups of women, by exposure to contraindications (unexposed vs. exposed) and planned place of birth (hospital vs. home). Linear and logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of the contraindications under study and to detect interactions between contraindications and planned place of birth.
The key findings of the study were that contraindications were related to higher rates of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, regardless of place of birth; women exposed to contraindications had higher rates of adverse outcomes in planned home birth; and healthy, unexposed women had higher rates of adverse outcomes in planned hospital birth. Contraindications significantly increased the risk of transfer in labour and postpartum haemorrhage in planned home births.
The defined contraindications for home birth had a negative effect on maternal and neonatal outcomes in Iceland, regardless of place of birth. The study results do not contradict the current national guidelines on place of birth.
PubMed ID
29389494 View in PubMed
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Elective cesarean section or not? Maternal age and risk of adverse outcomes at term: a population-based registry study of low-risk primiparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287351
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 08 17;16:230
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-17-2016
Author
Lina Herstad
Kari Klungsøyr
Rolv Skjærven
Tom Tanbo
Lisa Forsén
Thomas Åbyholm
Siri Vangen
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 08 17;16:230
Date
08-17-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cesarean Section - adverse effects
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Elective Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Emergency Treatment - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Norway
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Risk factors
Term Birth
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal age at delivery and cesarean section rates are increasing. In older women, the decision on delivery mode may be influenced by a reported increased risk of surgical interventions during labor and complications with increasing maternal age. We examined the association between maternal age and adverse outcomes in low-risk primiparous women, and the risk of adverse outcomes by delivery modes, both planned and performed (elective and emergency cesarean section, operative vaginal delivery, and unassisted vaginal delivery) in women aged?=?35 years.
A population-based registry study was conducted using data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway including 169,583 low-risk primiparas with singleton, cephalic labors at?=?37 weeks during 1999?-?2009. Outcomes studied were obstetric blood loss, maternal transfer to intensive care units, 5-min Apgar score, and neonatal complications. We adjusted for potential confounders using relative risk models and multinomial logistic regression.
Most adverse outcomes increased with increasing maternal age. However, the increase in absolute risks was low, except for moderate obstetric blood loss and transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Operative deliveries increased with increasing maternal age and in women aged?=?35 years, the risk of maternal complications in operative delivery increased. Neonatal adverse outcomes increased mainly in emergency operative deliveries. Moderate blood loss was three times more likely in elective and emergency cesarean section than in unassisted vaginal delivery, and twice as likely in operative vaginal delivery. Low Apgar score and neonatal complications occurred two to three times more often in emergency operative deliveries than in unassisted vaginal delivery. However, comparing outcomes after elective cesarean section and planned vaginal delivery, only moderate blood loss (higher in elective cesarean section), neonatal transfer to NICU and neonatal infections (both higher in planned vaginal delivery) differed significantly.
Most studied adverse outcomes increased with increasing maternal age, as did operative delivery. Although emergency operative procedures were associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes, the absolute risk difference in complications between the modes of delivery was low for the majority of outcomes studied.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27535233 View in PubMed
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[Emergency embolization in gynaecological bleeding. Two case reports]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16688
Source
Tunis Med. 2005 Aug;83(8):492-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Rajhi Hatremi
Amous Sameh
Salem Azza
Mnif Najla
Ben Hmid Rym
Mahjoub Sami
Zouari Faouzia
Hamza Radhi
Author Affiliation
Service d'Imagerie Médicale Hôpital Charles Nicolle, Tunis.
Source
Tunis Med. 2005 Aug;83(8):492-4
Date
Aug-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiography
Embolization, Therapeutic - methods
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Metrorrhagia - etiology - therapy
Obstetrical Forceps
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology - therapy
Pregnancy
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - complications - radiotherapy
Uterine Rupture - complications
Uterus - blood supply
Vagina - blood supply
Abstract
Two patients with gynaecological hemorrhage underwent successfully trans-arterial embolization. The first womanhad an uncontrollable perineal hemorrhage following a delivery with forceps. Angiography showed extravasation of contrast from right and left vaginal artery. Hyperselective embolisation stopped the vaginal bleeding. The second woman had massive hemorrhage following radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Angiography demonstrated extravasation of contrast from both uterine arteries. The bleeding was controlled after hyperselective embolisation. Emergency arterial embolisation is a safe and effective means of control of irrepressible genital hemorrhage.
PubMed ID
16238279 View in PubMed
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Emergency peripartum hysterectomy and risk factors by mode of delivery and obstetric history: a 10-year review from Helsinki University Central Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275635
Source
J Perinat Med. 2015 Nov;43(6):721-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Georg Macharey
Veli-Matti Ulander
Karel Kostev
Mervi Väisänen-Tommiska
Volker Ziller
Source
J Perinat Med. 2015 Nov;43(6):721-8
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Emergencies
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Multivariate Analysis
Peripartum Period
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology - surgery
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
This study aims to estimate the occurrence of emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) and to quantify its risk factors in connection with the mode of delivery and the obstetric history of patients at the Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
In a retrospective, matched case-control study we identified 124 cases of EPH from 2000 to 2010 at our hospital. These were matched with 248 control patients.
The incidence rate of EPH was 9.9/10,000. Patients whose current delivery was vaginal, and had a cesarean section (CS) in their history had a six-fold risk for EPH. Women who underwent their first CS had a nine times higher risk, while patients who currently underwent CS and had a history of previous CS, had a 22 times higher risk. Those who experienced prostaglandin-E1 induction had a five-fold risk. Maternal age >35 years, previous curettage, and twin pregnancy were identified as significant risk factors. In 41 cases, interventions to reduce bleeding were performed.
Obstetric emergency training and guidelines for massive hemorrhage should be established in any delivery department. Moreover, all possible precautions should be taken to avoid the first CS if it is obstetrically unnecessary. Induction with prostaglandin-E1, maternal age >35 years, previous curettage, twin pregnancies, and early gestation were identified as risk factors for EPH.
PubMed ID
24756039 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.