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362 records – page 1 of 37.

[10-year survival after lung resection for lung cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23455
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 5;156(49):7357-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1994
Author
M. Krasnik
K. Høier-Madsen
J. Sparup
Author Affiliation
Thoraxkirurgisk afdeling R, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 5;156(49):7357-60
Date
Dec-5-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Bronchogenic - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the prognosis for patients treated for lung cancer by operative resection in the Copenhagen area. Ninety-four consecutively operated patients were followed prospectively for ten years. Seventy-one percent of the patients had been operated radically. The five- and ten-year survival for this group was respectively 46 and 27%. All non-radically operated patients were dead after four years. The postoperative mortality and long-term survival correspond to international results. Type of cancer and mode of operation did not affect survival in the radically operated patients.
PubMed ID
7801397 View in PubMed
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30-day mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery has greatly improved over the last decade, but the 1-year mortality remains constant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269410
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laura Sommer Hansen
Vibeke Elisabeth Hjortdal
Jan Jesper Andreasen
Poul Erik Mortensen
Carl-Johan Jakobsen
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Valves - surgery
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a valuable tool in control of the quality of cardiac surgery. However, the validity of the risk score for the individual patient may be questioned. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the continued fall in short-term mortality reflects an actual improvement in late mortality, and subsequently, to investigate EuroSCORE as predictor of 1-year mortality.
A population-based cohort study of 25,602 patients from a 12-year period from three public university hospitals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Analysis was carried out based on EuroSCORE, age and co-morbidity factors (residual EuroSCORE).
During the period the average age increased from 65.1 ± 10.0 years to 68.9 ± 10.7 years (P
Notes
Comment In: Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):143-425849680
PubMed ID
25849679 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1986 Jun 10;106(16):1379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1986

[Abdominal aortic aneurysm at a county hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218599
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Mar 10;114(7):790-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1994
Author
H. Espelid
O. Vennesland
H J Rossebø
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling, Fylkessjukehuset i Haugesund.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Mar 10;114(7):790-2
Date
Mar-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Emergencies
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, County - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Prognosis
Abstract
During the period January 1985 to May 1993, 129 patients were hospitalized for abdominal aortic aneurysms at the hospital in Haugesund. Of these patients, 93 underwent surgery at our hospital. Acute operations were performed in 33 patients with a perioperative (30 days) mortality of 45%. 60 patients underwent elective surgery with no perioperative (30 days) mortality. 14 patients were sent to a regional/university hospital. For various reasons, 22 patients were not operated on.
PubMed ID
8009496 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm--results of treatment in nonspecialized units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242434
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1983;149(7):695-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
L. Lundell
B. Norbäck
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1983;149(7):695-702
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm - complications - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - complications - mortality - surgery
Female
Hospitals, District
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
A retrospective study was made of the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms in eight district general hospitals in Sweden in the period 1971-1980. The numbers of admitted cases rose steadily during these ten years, as did the numbers of operations. Most of the patients had ruptured aneurysm, though there was a manifold rise in the number of operations for asymptomatic aneurysm. The postoperative mortality increased with the level of emergency presented by the aneurysm symptoms, and was about 80% in patients with clinical shock. The results of operative treatment were essentially stable during the study period and they appeared to be similar to those obtained in patients referred to units specializing in vascular surgery. Patient age, preoperative recognition of the diagnosis, concomitance of complicating disease and magnitude of peroperative blood loss seemed to influence the results of surgery. Postoperative deaths tended to occur in the first few days and to be independent of the volume of transfused blood, although severe bleeding was a significant and often fatal postoperative complication.
PubMed ID
6650086 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal aortic aneurysms--results of 15 years' work in Lund].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249904
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 May 18;74(20):2015-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-1977

[Acute appendicitis: disputable problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191192
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2002;(1):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
S A Sovtsov
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2002;(1):59-61
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Appendicitis - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Latest Russian publications about pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, surgical policy and new approaches to its treatment are discussed. Based on many-year experience of surgical treatment of abdominal diseases and literature data, the author gives his opinion about inexpedience of appendectomy for cataral and unchanged appendix. Unfounded proposals towards changed diagnosis formulation in various forms of destructive appendicitis are subjected to criticism. It is concluded that it is necessary to use traditional approaches to diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.
PubMed ID
11875953 View in PubMed
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[A database with facts about large versus small hospitals. No significant differences in surgical mortality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218183
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 May 4;91(18):1853-4, 1859
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-1994

Age-dependent trends in postoperative mortality and preoperative comorbidity in isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277099
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):391-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kristinn Thorsteinsson
Kirsten Fonager
Charlotte Mérie
Gunnar Gislason
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Rikke N Mortensen
Jan J Andreasen
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):391-7
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Elective Surgical Procedures - mortality
Emergency Treatment - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
An increasing number of octogenarians are being subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The purpose of this study was to examine age-dependent trends in postoperative mortality and preoperative comorbidity over time following CABG.
All patients who underwent isolated CABG surgery between January 1996 and December 2012 in Denmark were included. Patients were identified through nationwide administrative registers. Age was categorized into five different groups and time into three periods to see if mortality and preoperative comorbidity had changed over time. Predictors of 30-day mortality were analysed in a multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models and survival at 1 and 5 years was estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves.
A total of 38 830 patients were included; the median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years, increasing over time to 66.6 ± 9.5 years. Males comprised 80%. The number of octogenarians was 1488 (4%). The median survival was 14.7 years (60-69 years), 10.7 years (70-74 years), 8.9 years (75-79 years) and 7.2 years (=80 years). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%, increasing with age (1% in patients 80 years), respectively. The proportion of patients >75 years increased from 10 to 20% during the study period as well as the proportion of patients undergoing urgent or emergency surgery. The burden of comorbidities increased over time, e.g. congestive heart failure 13-17%, diabetes 12-21%, stroke 9-11%, in all age groups. Age and emergency surgery were the main predictors of 30-day mortality: age >80 years [hazard ratio (HR): 5.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.41-7.50], emergency surgery (HR: 5.23, 95% CI: 4.38-6.25).
Patients are getting older at the time of surgery and have a heavier burden of comorbidities than before. The proportion of patients undergoing urgent or emergency surgery increased with age and over time. Despite this, the 30-day mortality decreased over time and long-term survival increased, except in octogenarians where it was stable. Octogenarians had substantially higher 30-day mortality compared with younger patients but surgery can be performed with acceptable risks and good long-term outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):397-826242898
PubMed ID
25698155 View in PubMed
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362 records – page 1 of 37.