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Advanced craniofacial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Description of surgical series, case report, and review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137527
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Mar;153(3):499-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vasily A Cherekaev
Denis A Golbin
Dmitry N Kapitanov
Vitaly V Roginsky
Sergey B Yakovlev
Sergey R Arustamian
Author Affiliation
Department of Skull Base and Craniofacial Surgery, N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute, 4th Tverskaya-Yamskaya str., 16, 125047, Moscow, Russia. tch@nsi.ru
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Mar;153(3):499-508
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Angiofibroma - blood supply - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Angiography
Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea - etiology - surgery
Child
Embolization, Therapeutic
Humans
Male
Moscow
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - blood supply - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Preoperative Care
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor occurring almost exclusively in adolescent and young adult males. The tumor is characterized by slow progression, aggressive growth, high vascularization, and increased rate of persistence and recurrence. The aim of this study was to describe a case of giant JNA from our practice and discuss the controversies of surgical treatment of advanced JNA.
A series of 29 consecutive male patients with JNA Fisch grade III and IV was surgically treated in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute from 2000 until 2008. In the vast majority of cases, endovascular embolization and surgical removal via orbitozygomatic approach were applied.
Gross total resection was achieved in 24 cases (83%). Complications were encountered in eight cases. No mortality was observed. In three patients, the diseases recurred. An illustrative case is described.
Surgical treatment is the basic tactics in management of extensive JNA including endovascular embolization and resection of the tumor. We recommend using orbitozygomatic approach or its modifications in JNA. Radiation therapy may be recommended for patients with small residual tumor.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Oct;153(10):1997-821805285
PubMed ID
21274578 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of reoperations on the middle ear in childhood].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218785
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1994 Mar-Apr;(2):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
M R Bogomil'skii
V R Chistiakova
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1994 Mar-Apr;(2):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Ear Diseases - complications - surgery
Ear, Middle - surgery
Humans
Mycoses - etiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Recurrence
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
According to the data provided by the Moscow ENT hospitals, the number of resurgery on the middle ear in children rose 3-fold. This is due to frequent failure of antrodrain surgery, higher prevalence of mycotic infection and recurrent inflammation in the middle ear. When planning otic surgery in children it is necessary to take into consideration both the involvement of the middle ear and medical personnel ability to provide proper postoperative care. Resurgery is justified in complicated disease course after primary intervention.
PubMed ID
7855998 View in PubMed
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Capsule excision after failed Molteno surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34294
Source
Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 1997 May;28(5):382-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J. Välimäki
A. Tuulonen
P J Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 1997 May;28(5):382-6
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cicatrix - etiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma - surgery
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Male
Middle Aged
Molteno Implants - adverse effects
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Visual acuity
Wound Healing
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of scar tissue formation requiring surgical intervention after single-plate Molteno implantation and the outcome of excision of the encapsulated bleb. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on 95 eyes of 79 consecutive patients who underwent a single-stage Molteno implantation for refractory glaucoma. Fourteen eyes of 12 patients developed an encapsulated bleb. A successful outcome after bleb excision was defined as final intraocular pressure (IOP) between 6 and 22 mm Hg with the same amount of medication as preoperatively or less. RESULTS: At the end of the mean follow-up of 30 months (range 8 to 75), the mean IOP (19.7 +/- 3.8 mm Hg) after bleb excision was significantly lower than the preoperative IOP (35.2 +/- 10.1 mm Hg; P
PubMed ID
9150522 View in PubMed
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Continent urinary tract reconstruction - the Lund experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18284
Source
BJU Int. 2003 Aug;92(3):271-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
W. Månsson
T. Davidsson
J. Könyves
F. Liedberg
A. Månsson
B. Wullt
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, University Hospital and Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
BJU Int. 2003 Aug;92(3):271-6
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bladder Neoplasms - blood - surgery
Colon - surgery
Creatinine - metabolism
Cystectomy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Reoperation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Diversion - methods
Urinary Reservoirs, Continent
Abstract
The Department of Urology in Lund, Sweden, has a long association with innovations in reconstructive urology. The authors from that department describe their experience over a long period with orthotopic bladder substitution and continent cutaneous urinary diversion. They conclude that continent urinary tract reconstruction is associated with a high incidence of early and late complications. They also found that for storage and emptying, their Lundiana pouch was superior to the Goldwasser neobladder. OBJECTIVE: To assess the early and late complications and functional results in patients undergoing continent reconstruction of the urinary tract, i.e. orthotopic bladder substitution (OBS) or continent cutaneous diversion (CCD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The medical records of all patients undergoing OBS (Goldwasser technique) or CCD ('Lundiana' technique) for malignant or benign disease during 1987-1999 and followed to December 2001 were reviewed. There were 67 patients with neobladders, 77 with a Lundiana pouch who had undergone radical cystectomy and 22 with a Lundiana pouch operated for benign disorders. RESULTS: Early complications requiring reoperation occurred in 12% of the cystectomy group, with no difference with type of reconstruction, and in 10% with benign diseases. Four patients (3%) undergoing radical cystectomy died from early cardiovascular complications, two after surgery for intra-abdominal complications. Intestinally related complications and wound dehiscence requiring re-operation occurred in nine and six patients, respectively. The incidence of late complications requiring open surgery was 22% and 23% after cystectomy with OBS and CCD, respectively. The value in patients with benign diseases undergoing CCD was also 23%. Stone formation in the pouch was common, occurring in 12% in patients with OBS and in 10% after CCD. The pouch perforated or ruptured in four patients. The incidence of uretero-intestinal stricture using the Le Duc technique was 2.4% and renal function was well preserved. The incidence of revisional surgery of the Lundiana pouch outlet for incontinence was low and all patients but four were continent. The functional outcome in patients with OBS was less good; some needed pouch augmentation or an artificial urinary sphincter. Most patients used incontinence products and many needed clean intermittent self-catheterization. CONCLUSION: Continent urinary tract reconstruction is associated with a high incidence of early and late complications. For storage and emptying, the CCD Lundiana pouch is superior to the OBS of Goldwasser.
PubMed ID
12887482 View in PubMed
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Cytoreductive surgery plus perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy in pseudomyxoma peritonei: aspects of the learning curve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103003
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2014 Aug;40(8):930-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
H. Andréasson
T. Lorant
L. Påhlman
W. Graf
H. Mahteme
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: hakan.andreasson@surgsci.uu.se.
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2014 Aug;40(8):930-6
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion - methods
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Hyperthermia, Induced
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Learning Curve
Male
Middle Aged
Perioperative Period
Peritoneal Cavity
Peritoneal Neoplasms - drug therapy - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Pseudomyxoma Peritonei - drug therapy - surgery
Reoperation
Surgical Procedures, Operative - education
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) plus perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a highly invasive treatment of peritoneal metastasis and requires many surgical procedures before mastering. The aim of this study was to estimate how many procedures are needed before stabilization can be seen in surgical outcome (R1 surgery, adverse events and bleeding) in patients with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP).
All 128 patients with PMP who were treated with CRS alone or CRS plus perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy between 2003 and 2008 at the Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, were included. The learning curve was calculated using the partial least square (PLS) and cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM) graph. Two groups were formed based on the results of the learning curve. The learning curve plateau was considered the same as the stabilization in the CUSUM graph. Group I consisted of patients included during the learning period (n = 73) and Group II of patients treated after the learning period ended (n = 55). Comparisons between the groups were made on surgical outcome, survival and adverse events.
Stabilization was seen after 220 ± 10 procedures. A higher occurrence of R1 surgery was seen in Group II (80%) compared to Group I (48%; P = 0.0002). Overall survival increased at four years after surgery in Group II compared to Group I (80% vs. 63%; P = 0.02).
CRS plus perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a highly demanding procedure that requires more than 200 procedures before optimisation in surgical outcome is seen.
PubMed ID
24656455 View in PubMed
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Editor's spotlight/Take 5: A review of current fixation usage and registry outcomes in total hip arthroplasty: the uncemented paradox [DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-2941-7]. Interview by Seth S. Leopold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114225
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jul;471(7):2047-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013

First metatarsophalangeal joint replacement with modular three-component press-fit implant. Preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266405
Source
Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech. 2013;80(1):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
L. Kolodziej
A. Bohatyrewicz
P. Zietek
Source
Acta Chir Orthop Traumatol Cech. 2013;80(1):64-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - surgery
Arthroplasty, Replacement - adverse effects - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gout - surgery
Hallux Rigidus - surgery
Humans
Joint Prosthesis
Male
Metatarsophalangeal Joint - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Middle Aged
Osteotomy - adverse effects - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Poland
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis-Related Infections - diagnosis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to assess functional and radiographic results of the first metatarsophalangeal joint replacement with use of unconstrained, modular, three components, porous titanium and hydroxyapatite coated, press-fit METIS® prosthesis. According to author's knowledge, results of that type of prosthesis have never been published before.
25 prosthesis were implanted in 24 patients between February 2009 and May 2011. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hallux Metatarsophalangeal Interphalangeal scoring system (AOFAS-HMI) was used to assess functional results. Patients were also asked if they would undergo procedure again or recommend it to other people. Weight bearing radiographs ware made at final follow up and analyzed for presence of osteolysis and radiolucencies. In 8 patients total joint replacement was introduced as a salvage after failure of previous surgery like Keller resection arthroplasty, failed arthrodesis, avascular necrosis and postoperative arthritis. In 11 patients the reason for prosthetic replacement were hallux rigidus, in 4 cases rheumatoid arthritis and gout in one patient. In two patients additional procedures like Akin phalangeal osteotomy and in one case fifth metatarsal osteotomy, was performed. There were 20 females and 4 males in presented group. The mean age at the operation was 56 years. The average follow up period was 18 months (from 12 to 36 months).
The median postoperative value of AOFAS-HMI scores was 88 points (from 75 to 95 points). First metatarsophalangeal joint motion (dorsiflexion plus plantarflexion) was classified according to AOFAS-HMI ranges as: moderately restricted (between 30 to 70 degrees) in 19 patients 80% (20 prosthesis) and severely restricted (less then 30 degrees) in 5 patients (20%). 15 (64%) patients were completely satisfied, 5 (20%) reported moderate satisfaction and (16%) 4 were totally disappointed and would not undergo this procedure again. A limited hallux dorsiflexion was the main dissatisfaction reason. Partial radiolucent line was seen in one patient (4%). Authors noticed two serious complications. In one patient, with rheumatoid arthritis, deep infection occurred 12 months after prosthesis implantation. In second case phalangeal implant was revised due to misalignment.
METIS® metatarsophalangeal joint replacement allows alleviate of pain relating to hallux rigidus and partial restoration of joint movement, even in patients after failures of primary metatarsophalangeal joint surgery. AOFAS-HMI results are better than previously reported in the literature in assessment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint replacement. Radiographic results imply satisfactory bone ingrowth into the cementless implants.
PubMed ID
23452424 View in PubMed
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Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy in male patients with external rectal prolapse is associated with a high reoperation rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285557
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2016 Oct;20(10):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
T. Rautio
J. Mäkelä-Kaikkonen
M. Vaarala
M. Kairaluoma
J. Kössi
M. Carpelan-Holmström
S. Salmenkylä
P. Ohtonen
J. Mäkelä
Source
Tech Coloproctol. 2016 Oct;20(10):715-20
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Fecal Incontinence - etiology - surgery
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Laparoscopy - adverse effects - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Rectal Prolapse - pathology - surgery
Rectum - surgery
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy has been used to treat male patients with external rectal prolapse, but evidence to support this approach is scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of this new abdominal rectopexy surgical technique in men.
This was a retrospective multicenter study. Adult male patients who were operated on for external rectal prolapse using ventral rectopexy in five tertiary hospitals in Finland between 2006 and 2014 were included in the study. Patient demographics, detailed operative, postoperative and short-term follow-up data were collected from patient registers in participating hospitals. A questionnaire and informed consent form was sent to all patients. The questionnaire included scores for anal incontinence, obstructed defecation syndrome, urinary symptoms and sexual dysfunction. The main outcome measure was the incidence of recurrent rectal prolapse. Surgical morbidity, the need for surgical repair due to recurrent symptoms and functional outcomes were secondary outcome measures.
A total of 52 adult male patients with symptoms caused by external rectal prolapse underwent ventral rectopexy. The questionnaire response rate was 64.4 %. Baseline clinical characteristics and perioperative results were similar in the responder and non-responder groups. A total of 9 (17.3 %) patients faced complications. There were two (3.8 %) serious surgical complications during the 30-day period after surgery that necessitated reoperation. None of the complications were mesh related. Recurrence of the prolapse was noticed in nine patients (17 %), and postoperative mucosal anal prolapse symptoms persisted in 11 patients (21 %). As a result, the reoperation rate was high. Altogether, 17 patients (33 %) underwent reoperation during the follow-up period due to postoperative complications or recurrent rectal or mucosal prolapse. According to the postoperative questionnaire data, patients under 40 had good functional results in terms of anal continence, defecation, urinary functions and sexual activity.
Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is a safe surgical procedure in male patients with external prolapse. However, a high overall reoperation rate was noticed due to recurrent rectal and residual mucosal prolapse. This suggests that the ventral rectopexy technique should be modified or combined with other abdominal or perineal methods when treating male rectal prolapse patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27641548 View in PubMed
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Managing complications associated with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122039
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Oct;55(5):329-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
P S Griffith
Daniel W Birch
Arya M Sharma
Shahzeer Karmali
Author Affiliation
The Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Oct;55(5):329-36
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anastomotic Leak - etiology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Constriction, Pathologic - etiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Gastric Bypass - adverse effects - methods
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - surgery
Humans
Intestinal Fistula - etiology - surgery
Intestinal Obstruction - etiology - surgery
Jejunum - pathology
Laparoscopy
Length of Stay
Male
Malnutrition - etiology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Surgical Stapling - adverse effects
Ulcer - etiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Obesity has become a major health concern in Canada. This has resulted in a steady rise in the number of bariatric surgical procedures being performed nationwide. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is not only the most common bariatric procedure, but also the gold standard to which all others are compared. With this in mind, it is imperative that all gastrointestinal surgeons understand the LRYGB and have a working knowledge of the common postoperative complications and their management. Early postoperative complications following LRYGB that demand immediate recognition include anastomotic or staple line leak, postoperative hemorrhage, bowel obstruction and incorrect Roux limb reconstructions. Later complications may be challenging to differentiate from other gastrointestinal disorders and include anastomotic stricture, marginal ulceration, fistula formation, weight gain and nutritional deficiencies. We discuss the principles involved in the management of each complication and the timing of referral to specialist bariatric centres.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854113 View in PubMed
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Midterm results following endovascular repair of blunt thoracic aortic injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127307
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2012 Feb;46(2):109-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Christos Lioupis
Kent S MacKenzie
Marc-Michel Corriveau
Daniel I Obrand
Cherrie Z Abraham
Oren K Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Division of Vascular Surgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2012 Feb;46(2):109-16
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aorta, Thoracic - injuries - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - mortality
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Quebec
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Vascular System Injuries - mortality - radiography - surgery
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - mortality - radiography - surgery
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have focused on early outcomes of thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) of blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs). Late results remain ill-defined. The purpose of this study is to review the midterm results of our experience with endovascular repair of BTAIs.
A retrospective analysis was performed reviewing all endovascular repairs of BTAIs from 2002 to present. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative variables were recorded. Clinical end points included aortic-related mortality, stroke and paraplegia, hospital length of stay, procedure-related complications, endoleaks, and reinterventions. Computed tomography data sets were postprocessed for assessing integrity of stent grafts and late complications.
A total of 24 cases of BTAIs treated with TEVAR were identified. Thoracic endovascular repair was successful in treating BTAIs in all patients and there were no instances of procedure-related death, stroke, or paraplegia. One access complication occurred, requiring an iliofemoral bypass. Actuarial survival estimates and freedom from reintervention at 5 years were 88.7% and 95.8%, respectively. No late endoleaks, stent fractures, or device migration were identified. One patient required a secondary intervention 1 year following the initial repair to treat a pseudocoarctation syndrome caused by a diaphragm at the distal half of the stented aorta. This was treated successfully with repeated endografting.
Thoracic endovascular repair for BTAIs can be performed safely with low periprocedural mortality and morbidity. Midterm follow-up data presented in this report further support the therapeutic role of endoluminal approach for treating BTAIs in anatomically suitable patients.
PubMed ID
22308206 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.