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523 records – page 1 of 53.

[14th Congress European Association of Urology, Stockholm, Sweden. Therapy of advanced cancer of the bladder]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20778
Source
Urologe A. 1999 Sep;38(5 Suppl):1-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Sep-1999

[Abbreviated surgical stay programs--a professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195039
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk sektion 435 Gastroenheden H:S Hvidovre Hospital DK-2650 Hvidovre.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Date
Mar-10-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multicenter studies.
PubMed ID
11301705 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic aneurysms: should they all be resected?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249460
Source
Br J Surg. 1977 Nov;64(11):767-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1977
Author
J. Christenson
B. Eklöf
I. Gustafson
Source
Br J Surg. 1977 Nov;64(11):767-72
Date
Nov-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aorta, Abdominal - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - surgery
Critical Care
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Male
Postoperative Care
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
A retrospective study has been carried out on 124 consecutive patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms admitted during the period 1960-74. The mortality rate after emergency operation was 56 per cent and after elective operation 15 per cent. As in other vascular centres during these years the mortality rate has decreased among electively operated patients. We have tried to answer two questions: which patients without signs of rupture should undergo operation and which patients with a ruptured aneurysm should not be operated upon?
PubMed ID
588967 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated course in hip arthroplasty]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61715
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2001
Author
S. Rasmussen
M U Kramhøft
K P Sperling
J H Pedersen
I B Falck
E M Pedersen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Privathospitalet Hamlet, Frederiksberg. sten.rasmussen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Date
Dec-3-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - nursing - rehabilitation
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Patient Discharge
Physical Therapy Modalities
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the results of a well-defined rehabilitation programme after hip arthroplasty. METHODS: The effects of a revised, optimised, perioperative care programme with continuous epidural analgesia, oral nutrition, and physiotherapy were assessed in 60 patients before intervention and 60 patients after intervention. RESULTS: The hospital stay was reduced from nine to six days (p
PubMed ID
11766505 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated recovery program after hip fracture surgery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61643
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 30;165(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2002
Author
Sten Rasmussen
Billy B Kristensen
Susanne Foldager
Lis Myhrmann
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Vejle Sygehus, DK-7300 Vejle. sten.rasmussen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Dec 30;165(1):29-33
Date
Dec-30-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - methods - rehabilitation
Comparative Study
Denmark
Early Ambulation - methods
English Abstract
Female
Hip Fractures - rehabilitation - surgery
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: A multimodal approach to minimise the effect of the surgical stress response can reduce complications and hospital stay after abdominal surgery and hip arthroplasty. The aim of the study was to assess the results of a well-defined rehabilitation programme after hip fracture. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In an open intervention study, we entered 200 consecutive patients with hip fracture allowing full weight-bearing after operative treatment. The effect of a revised, optimised perioperative care programme with continuous epidural analgesia, early oral nutrition, oxygen supplementation, restricted volume and transfusion therapy, and intensive physiotherapy and mobilisation was assessed (n = 100) and compared with the conventional perioperative treatment programme before the intervention (n = 100). The median age was 82 (56-96) years in the control group and 82 (63-101) years in the accelerated multimodal perioperative treatment group. RESULTS: The median hospital stay was reduced from 21 (range 1-162, mean 32) to 11 (range 1-100, mean 17) days. The total use of days in hospital was reduced from 3211 to 1667. There were fewer complications, whereas the need for home care after discharge was unchanged. CONCLUSION: An accelerated clinical pathway with focus on pain relief, oral nutrition, and rehabilitation may reduce hospital stay and improve recovery after hip fracture.
PubMed ID
12529945 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated surgical stay programs. A professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195646
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, gastroenheden, kirurgisk afsnit.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Date
Jan-22-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Denmark
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multi-center studies.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):41511218774
PubMed ID
11218776 View in PubMed
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Achilles tendon elongation after rupture repair: a randomized comparison of 2 postoperative regimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80659
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Kangas Jarmo
Pajala Ari
Ohtonen Pasi
Leppilahti Juhana
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 2007 Jan;35(1):59-64
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries - surgery
Adult
Athletic Injuries - rehabilitation - surgery
Casts, Surgical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care
Rupture
Tendon Injuries - rehabilitation - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A few prospective controlled trials comparing early functional rehabilitation after Achilles tendon repair and non-operative immobilization have been reported. HYPOTHESES: There is no difference in Achilles tendon elongation between early motion and immobilization after Achilles tendon repair. Tendon elongation does not correlate with the clinical outcome. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: Fifty patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were randomized postoperatively to receive either early movement of the ankle between neutral and plantar flexion in a brace for 6 weeks or immobilization in tension using a below-knee cast with the ankle in a neutral position for 6 weeks. Full weightbearing was allowed after 3 weeks in both groups. Standardized radiographs to measure previously placed radiographic markers were taken on the first day postoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 weeks postoperatively, with the final radiograph a mean of 60 (SD, 6.4) weeks postoperatively. The outcome was assessed at the 3-month and final checkups by the clinical scoring method described by Leppilahti et al and included subjective factors and objective factors. RESULTS: Tendon elongation occurred in both groups but was somewhat less in the early motion group (median 2 mm in the early motion group vs median 5 mm in the cast group a mean of 60 weeks postoperatively, P = .054). The elongation curves first rose and then slowly fell in both groups. The patients who had less elongation achieved a better clinical outcome (rho = -.42, P = .017). Tendon elongation did not correlate significantly with age, body mass index, or isokinetic peak torques. CONCLUSION: Achilles tendon elongation was somewhat less in the early motion group and correlated with the clinical outcome scores. We recommend early functional postoperative treatment after Achilles rupture repair.
PubMed ID
16973901 View in PubMed
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[Active climatotherapy of patients operated on for osteoarticular tuberculosis under central Ural conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45025
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1966;44(11):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

[Adherence to Therapy as a Factor Determining Prognosis of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269009
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(5):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S A Pomeshkina
I V Borovik
I N Zavyrylina
E S Kagan
O L Barbarash
Source
Kardiologiia. 2015;55(5):48-53
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Postoperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Siberia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
to study the influence of the patients adherence to the recommended therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on prognosis of postoperative period.
We examined 197 consecutive patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone CABG. Age of patients was 38-75 years.
Assessment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors showed that about half of patients had smoked before CABG and only a few gave up smoking after surgery. Number of patients with abdominal obesity increased by 8% after surgery. Number of patients involved in physical trainings remained unchanged. Adherence to drug therapy before CABG was low. Less than half of the patients took antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, only 25% took statins. One year after CABG number of patients taking appropriate medications significantly increased. However, only half of patients managed to achieve the main objectives of secondary prevention.
PubMed ID
26615624 View in PubMed
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523 records – page 1 of 53.