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[A databank on Russian families with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201190
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1999;99(7):52-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
I N Lunga
S S Shishkin
N I Shakhovskaia
N L Gerasimova
D I Zelinskaia
A A Khodunova
V A Shakhovskii
M A Tarksh
I N Krakhmaleva
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1999;99(7):52-4
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commonwealth of Independent States - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Neuromuscular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Postal Service
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The information about 5 thousands Russian families with hereditary neuromuscular disorders (HNMD) was collected by means of both different genetic epidemiological methods and authors' own observations. On the basis of this material a computer database MYODYS in Excel 5.0 format was created, which included information about 30 different signs concerning 1920 families from 70 regions of Russia. The study of the data, included in MYODYS, revealed several problems in practical diagnosis of HNMD in Russia. It is necessary to resolve these important problems for correct genetic consulting and treatment. MYODYS database may serve as a basis for elaboration of a special complex programme for long-term support of the families with NNMD in Russia.
PubMed ID
10441854 View in PubMed
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ADCS Prevention Instrument Project: quality of life assessment (QOL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79595
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patterson Marian B
Whitehouse Peter J
Edland Steven D
Sami Susie A
Sano Mary
Smyth Kathleen
Weiner Myron F
Author Affiliation
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. marian.patterson@case.edu
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Oct-Dec;20(4 Suppl 3):S179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Postal Service
Primary Prevention
Proxy
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Assessment (Psychology)
United States
Abstract
Information about quality of life (QOL) is valuable in evaluating pharmaceutical agents but it is not adequately assessed in many dementia drug trials. In prevention trials, following participants to conversion to AD requires QOL scales appropriate for both normal and cognitively impaired individuals. Our objective was to evaluate the utility of several scales for subject or informant QOL assessment: Quality of Life-AD; Quality of Life Activity Inventory; SF-36; SF-12 (a shortened version of the SF-36); and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Measurements were collected from 644 subject-study partner pairs, half of whom completed the instruments at the clinic and half at home. Three-month test-retest data were collected. Scales administered at home or in clinic did not differ significantly. Subject self-ratings showed a wide range for all scales. Test-retest intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.67 to 0.77. Moderately high interscale associations suggest that the scales are measuring common aspects of QOL but are not equivalent. Furthermore, they differed with respect to associations with demographic variables and QOL determinants. We conclude that the QOL scores at baseline show sufficient range and reliability to suggest they will have utility in tracking QOL through conversion to dementia.
PubMed ID
17135811 View in PubMed
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Advent of mail-order pharmacy causes concern among some pharmacists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215208
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1485-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1995
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1485-6
Date
May-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Pharmacies - utilization
Pharmacists
Postal Service
Professional-Patient Relations
Quebec
Societies, Pharmaceutical
Abstract
MEDITrust, a major mail-order pharmacy, promises low drug prices and dispensing fees for people who order drugs via mail. Its arrival has created some strong opposition in Quebec. The Canadian Pharmaceutical Association says the arrival of mail-order companies may give community pharmacists an opportunity to promote the benefits of face-to-face contact with pharmacists. The CMA's Dr. Anne Carter says there will always be a need for community pharmacists, who can provide drugs on short notice and provide personal counselling for patients.
PubMed ID
7728698 View in PubMed
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Age and sex as determinants of the relative aerobic strain of nonmotorized mail delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249370
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1977 Dec;3(4):225-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1977
Author
P. Oja
V. Louhevaara
O. Korhonen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1977 Dec;3(4):225-33
Date
Dec-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Female
Finland
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Postal Service
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Work
Abstract
The relative aerobic strain (RAS) of nonmotorized mail delivery was assessed in 54 Finnish mail carriers who represented both sexes, the entire workage range and both downtown and suburban delivery districts. The mean RAS of the entire delivery time was 55% of the maximal oxygen uptake (ml/kg-min). It was higher for women than for men, and higher for suburban than for downtown delivery. The RAS tended to increase systematically with age after the age of 50. The work strain of mail carriers of over 50 years of age, especially of older women carriers in suburban areas, was concluded to be high enough to lead to possible excessive strain on the workers.
PubMed ID
594730 View in PubMed
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Agreement of self-reported estrogen use with prescription data: an analysis of women from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160362
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lorenzo Sandini
Kati Pentti
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Risto Honkanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Lorenzo.Sandini@uku.fi
Source
Menopause. 2008 Mar-Apr;15(2):282-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Data Collection - methods
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Osteoporosis - drug therapy
Postal Service
Reproducibility of Results
Self Administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Self-reported data are usually used for the evaluation of the effects of hormone therapy in population studies. We examined the agreement between self-reported hormone therapy use and nationwide prescription data from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland to evaluate the accuracy of self-reports.
The 10-year questionnaire of the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Study was sent in 1999 to 12,562 women aged 57 to 67 years; 11,377 women who completed questionnaires were eligible for analysis. We asked women whether they had been taking estrogen hormone therapy as a gel, plaster, or tablet for the treatment of climacteric symptoms or osteoporosis and if the answer was yes, to specify the brand and duration of treatment for each year from 1994 to 1999.
Among the 11,377 women, 3,105 (27.3%) reported the use of an estrogen-based preparation in 1996 to 1999, and 97.6% were confirmed by Social Insurance Institution of Finland to have been prescribed hormone therapy during that time. In these women the median duration of use was 32 months (range, 1-41), according to Social Insurance Institution of Finland data. An additional 1,738 women had been prescribed hormone therapy for short periods, but those women did not report it. The duration of self-reported hormone therapy use was compared to the duration of prescriptions. A difference of 3 months or less per year was observed in 63.4% to 77.0% of women during the years 1996-1998.
A postal inquiry is a reliable method of recording long-term hormone therapy use.
PubMed ID
17998884 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is associated with lower self-reported disease activity and better health-related quality of life in female rheumatoid arthritis patients in Sweden: data from BARFOT, a multicenter study on early RA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108516
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Stefan Bergman
Sofia Symeonidou
Maria L Andersson
Maria K Söderlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. stefan.bergman@spenshult.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:218
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Postal Service
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Earlier studies have found a positive effect of alcohol consumption, with a reduced disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to assess alcohol consumption and its association with disease activity and health related quality of life (HRQL) in Swedish RA patients.
Between 1992 and 2005, 2,800 adult patients were included in the BARFOT study of early RA in Sweden. In 2010 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to all 2,102 prevalent patients in the BARFOT study enquiring about disease severity, HRQL, and lifestyle factors. Alcohol consumption was assessed using the validated AUDIT-C questionnaire.
A total of 1,238 out of 1,460 patients answering the questionnaire had data on alcohol consumption: 11% were non-drinkers, 67% had a non-hazardous drinking, and 21% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Women who drank alcohol reported lower disease activity and better HRQL, but there were no association between alcohol consumption and disease activity in men. For current smokers, alcohol use was only associated with fewer patient-reported swollen joints. The outcome was not affected by kind of alcohol consumed.
There was an association between alcohol consumption and both lower self-reported disease activity and higher HRQL in female, but not in male, RA patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23879655 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infection: the importance of diagnostic uncertainty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176330
Source
J Pediatr. 2005 Feb;146(2):222-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sandra R Arnold
Teresa To
Warren J McIsaac
Elaine E L Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2005 Feb;146(2):222-6
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Pediatrics
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Postal Service
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Rural Health Services
Urban Health Services
Abstract
Antibiotic misuse for viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI) in children is a significant problem. We determined the influence on antibiotic prescribing of clinical features that may increase concern about possible bacterial infection (age, appearance, fever) in children with URI.
We created 16 scenarios of children with URI and distributed them by mail survey to 540 pediatricians and family practitioners in Ontario, Canada. The association of patient clinical features, parental pressure, and physician characteristics with antibiotic prescribing was determined through the use of logistic regression analysis.
A total of 257 physicians responded (48%). Poor appearance (OR, 6.50; 95% CI, 5.06 to 3.84), fever above 38.5 degrees C (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.82), and age older than 2 years (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.85 to 2.78) were associated with prescribing, whereas parental pressure was not. Physician characteristics associated with antibiotic use were family practitioner (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.96), increasing number of patients seen per week (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.08 for every 20-patient increase), and increasing physician age (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.24, 5-year increments).
Clinical factors, which may lead physicians to be concerned about possible bacterial infection in children, are associated with antibiotic use for pediatric URI.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2005 Nov;147(5):714; author reply 714-516291373
PubMed ID
15689913 View in PubMed
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Application of hair-mercury analysis to determine the impact of a seafood advisory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70863
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Feb;97(2):200-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Pál Weihe
Philippe Grandjean
Poul J Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Faroese Hospital System, Sigmundargøta 5, P.O. Box 14, FO-110 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.
Source
Environ Res. 2005 Feb;97(2):200-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Dolphins
Female
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Postal Service
Public Health
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Management
Abstract
Following an official recommendation in the Faroe Islands that women should abstain from eating mercury-contaminated pilot whale meat, a survey was carried out to obtain information on dietary habits and hair samples for mercury analysis. A letter was sent to all 1180 women aged 26-30 years who resided within the Faroes, and the women were contacted again 1 year later. A total of 415 women responded to the first letter; the second letter resulted in 145 repeat hair samples and 125 new responses. Questionnaire results showed that Faroese women, on average, consumed whale meat for dinner only once every second month, but the frequency and meal size depended on the availability of whale in the community. The geometric mean hair-mercury concentration at the first survey was higher in districts with available whale than in those without (3.03 vs. 1.88 microg/g; P=0.001). The mercury concentration also depended on the frequency of whale meat dinners and on the consumption of dried whale meat. The 36 women who did not eat whale meat at all had a geometric mean hair-mercury concentration of 1.28 microg/g. At the time of the second survey, the geometric mean had decreased to 1.77 microg/g (P
PubMed ID
15533336 View in PubMed
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Application of novel communication technologies to the study of farm families: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159943
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):364-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Lesley Day
James Dosman
Louise Hagel
Suzanne Dostaler
Phyllis Snodgrass
Jeremy Thiessen
Robert J Brison
H Jay Biem
Barbara L Marlenga
Niels Koehncke
Trever Crowe
Punam Pahwa
William Pickett
Author Affiliation
Monash University Accident Research Centre, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, 3800, Australia. lesley.day@muarc.monash.edu.au
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):364-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture
Communication
Communications Media
Electronic Mail
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance - methods
Postal Service
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Telephone
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of three different communication technologies for collection of health outcomes from farm households.
A randomized controlled trial was conducted in central Saskatchewan, Canada in 2006. The 94 farms completing the baseline questionnaire were randomly assigned to follow-up by regular mail (n=30), computer telephony (n=32), or their choice of regular mail, computer telephony, or e-mail follow-up (n=32). The primary endpoints were absolute differences in the proportions of farms using the assigned method to provide follow-up data, 2 months post-recruitment.
Of the total study population, 51 (54.3%) provided follow-up information. Farms in the regular mail arm were more likely to submit follow-up data than farms in the other arms (27/30 regular mail vs. 23/32 choice vs. 2/32 computer telephony). The differences in proportions between the computer telephony and other study arms were highly significant (e.g., absolute difference between regular mail and computer telephony 83.7% [95% CI: 70.1%, 97.3%; p
PubMed ID
18061658 View in PubMed
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Assessment of ePrescription quality: an observational study at three mail-order pharmacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90289
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Astrand Bengt
Montelius Emelie
Petersson Göran
Ekedahl Anders
Author Affiliation
Apoteket AB, and School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden. bengt.astrand@hik.se
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Prescribing - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Observation
Pharmacies - standards
Postal Service
Prescription Drugs
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The introduction of electronic transfer of prescriptions (ETP) or ePrescriptions in ambulatory health care has been suggested to have a positive impact on the prescribing and dispensing processes. Thereby, implying that ePrescribing can improve safety, quality, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness. In December 2007, 68% of all new prescriptions were transferred electronically in Sweden. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of ePrescriptions by comparing the proportions of ePrescriptions and non-electronic prescriptions necessitating a clarification contact (correction, completion or change) with the prescriber at the time of dispensing. METHODS: A direct observational study was performed at three Swedish mail-order pharmacies which were known to dispense a large proportion of ePrescriptions (38-75%). Data were gathered on all ePrescriptions dispensed at these pharmacies over a three week period in February 2006. All clarification contacts with prescribers were included in the study and were classified and assessed in comparison with all drug prescriptions dispensed at the same pharmacies over the specified period. RESULTS: Of the 31225 prescriptions dispensed during the study period, clarification contacts were made for 2.0% (147/7532) of new ePrescriptions and 1.2% (79/6833) of new non-electronic prescriptions. This represented a relative risk (RR) of 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.2) for new ePrescriptions compared to new non-electronic prescriptions. The increased RR was mainly due to 'Dosage and directions for use', which had an RR of 7.6 (95% CI 2.8-20.4) when compared to other clarification contacts. In all, 89.5% of the suggested pharmacist interventions were accepted by the prescriber, 77.7% (192/247) as suggested and an additional 11.7% (29/247) after a modification during contact with the prescriber. CONCLUSION: The increased proportion of prescriptions necessitating a clarification contact for new ePrescriptions compared to new non-electronic prescriptions indicates the need for an increased focus on quality aspects in ePrescribing deployment. ETP technology should be developed towards a two-way communication between the prescriber and the pharmacist with automated checks of missing, inaccurate, or ambiguous information. This would enhance safety and quality for the patient and also improve efficiency and cost-effectiveness within the health care system.
PubMed ID
19171038 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.