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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Alpha-antitrypsin Pi types in postmortem blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252045
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1975 Aug;112(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975
Author
R C Talamo
W M Thurlbeck
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1975 Aug;112(2):201-7
Date
Aug-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Autopsy
Blood Specimen Collection - methods
Blood Transfusion
Canada
Europe
Female
France - ethnology
Gene Frequency
Greece - ethnology
Humans
Italy - ethnology
Lung - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Portugal - ethnology
Pulmonary Emphysema - blood - genetics - pathology
alpha 1-Antitrypsin - analysis
alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
Abstract
It is possible to determine alpha1-antitrypsin Pi types from serum obtained at necropsy. The Pi types were identical in 37 paired antemortem and postmortem samples. Blood transfusion in the 72 hours preceeding death may produce serum that cannot be typed. The frequency of the Pis allele was high in this study (0.074) and may reflect terminal alterations in alpha1-antitrypsin mobility and thus Pi typing, or a higher frequency in the population studied. The Pis allele was particularly frequent among Canadians with French names and Canadians born in Italy, Greece, and Portugal. The prevalence and severity of emphysema were not increased in PiA and Pis heterozygotes, but the groups studied were small and the variable, smoking, could not be adequately controlled. Studies of larger groups are recommended.
PubMed ID
1080379 View in PubMed
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Assessment of two culturally competent diabetes education methods: individual versus individual plus group education in Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164619
Source
Ethn Health. 2007 Apr;12(2):163-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Enza Gucciardi
Margaret Demelo
Ruth N Lee
Sherry L Grace
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, Victoria St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. enza.gucciardi@uhn.on.ca
Source
Ethn Health. 2007 Apr;12(2):163-87
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Counseling
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Humans
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Portugal - ethnology
Self-Help Groups
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the impact of two culturally competent diabetes education methods, individual counselling and individual counselling in conjunction with group education, on nutrition adherence and glycemic control in Portuguese Canadian adults with type 2 diabetes over a three-month period.
The Diabetes Education Centre is located in the urban multicultural city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We used a three-month randomized controlled trial design. Eligible Portuguese-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to receive either diabetes education counselling only (control group) or counselling in conjunction with group education (intervention group). Of the 61 patients who completed the study, 36 were in the counselling only and 25 in the counselling with group education intervention. We used a per-protocol analysis to examine the efficacy of the two educational approaches on nutrition adherence and glycemic control; paired t-tests to compare results within groups and analysis of covariance (ACOVA) to compare outcomes between groups adjusting for baseline measures. The Theory of Planned Behaviour was used to describe the behavioural mechanisms that influenced nutrition adherence.
Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behaviour control, and intentions towards nutrition adherence, self-reported nutrition adherence and glycemic control significantly improved in both groups, over the three-month study period. Yet, those receiving individual counselling with group education showed greater improvement in all measures with the exception of glycemic control, where no significant difference was found between the two groups at three months.
Our study findings provide preliminary evidence that culturally competent group education in conjunction with individual counselling may be more efficacious in shaping eating behaviours than individual counselling alone for Canadian Portuguese adults with type 2 diabetes. However, larger longitudinal studies are needed to determine the most efficacious education method to sustain long-term nutrition adherence and glycemic control.
PubMed ID
17364900 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural perspectives on research participation and informed consent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173688
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jan;62(2):479-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Paula C Barata
Enza Gucciardi
Farah Ahmad
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ont., Canada. Paula.barata@uhn.on.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jan;62(2):479-90
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Biomedical research
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Informed Consent - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Selection
Portugal - ethnology
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Role Playing
Trust
Abstract
This study examined Portuguese Canadian and Caribbean Canadian immigrants' perceptions of health research and informed consent procedures. Six focus groups (three in each cultural group) involving 42 participants and two individual interviews were conducted. The focus groups began with a general question about health research. This was followed by three short role-plays between the moderator and the assistant. The role-plays involved a fictional health research study in which a patient is approached for recruitment, is read a consent form, and is asked to sign. The role-plays stopped at key moments at which time focus group participants were asked questions about their understanding and their perceptions. Focus group transcripts were coded in QSR NUDIST software using open coding and then compared across cultural groups. Six overriding themes emerged: two were common in both the Portuguese and Caribbean transcripts, one emphasized the importance of trust and mistrust, and the other highlighted the need and desire for more information about health research. However, these themes were expressed somewhat differently in the two groups. In addition, there were four overriding themes that were specific to only one cultural group. In the Portuguese groups, there was an overwhelming positive regard for the research process and an emphasis on verbal as opposed to written information. The Caribbean participants qualified their participation in research studies and repeatedly raised images of invasive research.
PubMed ID
16039028 View in PubMed
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Early childhood caries and access to dental care among children of Portuguese-speaking immigrants in the city of Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154318
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Nov;74(9):805
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Renata I Werneck
Herenia P Lawrence
Gajanan V Kulkarni
David Locker
Author Affiliation
Health and Biological Sciences Centre, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Nov;74(9):805
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angola - ethnology
Azores - ethnology
Bottle Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Brazil - ethnology
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Communication Barriers
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Diet, Cariogenic
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Language
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Portugal - ethnology
Abstract
To determine the influence of accessibility of dental services and other factors on the development of early childhood caries (ECC) among Toronto children 48 months of age or younger with at least one Portuguese-speaking immigrant parent.
This population-based case-control study involved 52 ECC cases and 52 controls (i.e., without ECC) identified from community centres, churches and drop-in centres by a process of network sampling. Caries status (dmft/s) was assessed by clinical examination. Access to dental care and risk factors for ECC were determined through a structured interview with the Portuguese-speaking parent.
Forty (77%) of the children with ECC but only 28 (54%) of controls had never visited a dentist. Thirty (58%) mothers of children with ECC but only 13 (25%) mothers of controls had not visited a dentist in the previous year. Bivariate analyses revealed that low family income, no family dentist, no dental insurance, breastfeeding, increased frequency of daily snacks and low parental knowledge about harmful child feeding habits were associated with ECC. Non-European-born parents and parents who had immigrated in their 20s or at an older age were 2 to 4 times more likely to have a child with ECC than European parents and those who had immigrated at a younger age. Lack of insurance, no family dentist and frequency of snacks were factors remaining in the final logistic regression model for ECC.
The strongest predictors of ECC in this immigrant population, after adjustment for frequent snack consumption, were lack of dental care and lack of dental insurance. These findings support targeting resources to the prevention of ECC in children of new immigrants, who appear to experience barriers to accessing private dental care and who are exposed to many of the determinants of oral disease.
PubMed ID
19000463 View in PubMed
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Food choice motives and the importance of family meals among immigrant mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174187
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(2):77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Marie Marquis
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Faculté de médecine, Département de nutrition, QC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(2):77-82
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Choice Behavior
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Portugal - ethnology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
To determine the health and social benefits of the family mealtime, we examined the contribution of immigrant mothers' food motives to the importance placed on family meals, and cultural differences in mothers' food motives and the importance ascribed to family meals. Data were taken from a study on food choice factors among ten- to 12-year-old children from three cultural communities in Montreal. A 24-item, self-administered questionnaire was used to explore food choice motives. Each mother was also asked how important it was for her family to take the time to eat together, and if the child enjoyed sharing meals with his or her family. In all, 209 of the 653 questionnaires distributed were valid; 68 were from Haitian, 75 from Portuguese, and 66 from Vietnamese mothers. Five factors emerging from factor analyses explained 61.67% of the variance. Analysis of variance indicated significant differences between mothers' countries of origin for the importance placed on health, pleasure, familiarity, and ingredient properties (p
PubMed ID
15975196 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Ment Health. 1978 Jun;26(2):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978

The mental health of Portuguese children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221748
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
D J Pepler
I. Lessa
Author Affiliation
York University, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;38(1):46-50
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Child Reactive Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Portugal - ethnology
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the mental health of Portuguese children in Canada. Preliminary work involved a survey of professionals serving the Portuguese community and the translation and assessment of a standardized child behaviour checklist. Forty-five Portuguese children and 45 non Portuguese children referred to a children's mental health centre were compared on demographic and family indicators and their referral source. There were similar proportions of boys and girls in the two groups, similar types of services were requested, and they had similar treatment histories. The Portuguese children were older at the time of referral and were more likely to be referred by educational agencies than the non Portuguese children. Portuguese families appeared to experience different stresses than non Portuguese families. Implications of these findings for the provision of culturally sensitive interventions for Portuguese children and their families are discussed.
PubMed ID
8448721 View in PubMed
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The natural history of Machado-Joseph disease. An analysis of 138 personally examined cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239921
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1984 Nov;11(4 Suppl):510-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1984
Author
A. Barbeau
M. Roy
L. Cunha
A N de Vincente
R N Rosenberg
W L Nyhan
P L MacLeod
G. Chazot
L B Langston
D M Dawson
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1984 Nov;11(4 Suppl):510-25
Date
Nov-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Azores - ethnology
Canada
Cerebellar Ataxia - diagnosis - genetics
Child
Computers
Female
France
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Portugal - ethnology
Syndrome
United States
Abstract
We have examined 138 cases of a disorder previously described in people of Portuguese origin and which has received many names. By computer analysis of 46 different items of a standardized neurological examination carried out in each patient, we have been able to delineate the main components of the clinical presentation, to conclude that the marked variability in clinical expressions does not negate the homogeneity of the disorder, and to describe the natural history of this entity which should be called, for historical reasons, "Machado-Joseph Disease". This hereditary disease has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, presenting as a progressive ataxia with external ophthalmoplegia, and should be classified within the group of "Ataxic multisystem degenerations". When the disease starts before the age of 20, it may present with marked spasticity, of a non progressive nature but often so severe that it can be accompanied by "Gegenhalten" countermovements and dystonic postures but little frank dystonia. There are few true extrapyramidal symptoms except akinesia. When the disease starts after the age of 50, the clinical spectrum is mostly that of an amyotrophic polyneuropathy with fasciculations accompanying the ataxia. For all the other cases the clinical picture is a continuum between these two extremes, the main determinant of the clinical phenotype being the age of onset and a secondary factor, the place of origin of the given kindred. The ataxic and amyotrophic components are clearly progressive with time in contrast to the spasticity component. Although the majority of known cases are of Portuguese origin, this is not obligatory. The next research endeavour should be a search for the chromosomal site of the gene, using molecular biology technology such as those for recombinant DNA.
PubMed ID
6509398 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.