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Adolescent suicide attempts in Bærum, Norway, 1984-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138824
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gudrun Dieserud
Ragnhild M Gerhardsen
Hanne Van den Weghe
Karina Corbett
Author Affiliation
Department of Suicide Research and Prevention, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. gudi@fhi.no
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Conflict (Psychology)
Family - psychology
Female
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Population Surveillance
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suburban Population - trends
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - trends
Abstract
There are presently few international studies that examine adolescents' own experience of both triggering and the underlying reasons behind their suicide attempts.
To present the rates, triggering factors, and underlying reasons for such behavior.
The 23-year (1984-2006) surveillance study reported includes all general hospital-treated suicide attempters aged between 13 and 19 years (n = 254) living in the municipality of Bærum, a suburb on the outskirts of Oslo, Norway.
Suicide attempt rates for both sexes decreased during the period of study. The female suicide attempt rate was on average 3.5 times higher than the male rate. An average of 8.2% of the suicide attempters made a repeat attempt within the following year. Overall, the most commonly reported trigger was a relational conflict (50.2%), and the most commonly reported underlying reason was a dysfunctional family situation (43.6%), followed by mental health problems (22.8%). The main gender difference for both triggers and underlying reasons was that relational conflicts were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys as triggers (55.0% versus 32.7%), and dysfunctional family issues were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys (47.1% versus 30.8%) as underlying reasons for the attempt. Mental health problems were reported less frequently as an underlying reason by girls than boys (21.2% versus 28.8%).
A family-oriented intervention embracing the extended family system seems warranted in a majority of the cases in our study.
PubMed ID
21134845 View in PubMed
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Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
Japanese cur- rent. North of the Aleutian chain, the entire western coast of the state quickly assumes a Table 3.-General Population Trends in Alaska, 1740-19601'pOl Year Total Native Non-Native 1740-80 74,000 74,000 1839 39,813 39,107 706 1880 33,426 32,996 430 1890 32,052 25,354 6,698 1900
  1 document  
Author
FitzGerald, J.H
Author Affiliation
Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic
Climate
Population trends
Resource development
Topography
Documents

67-10-Alaska the Land and the People.pdf

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An update to 21-hydroxylase deficient congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150534
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2010 Jan;26(1):63-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Eftihios Trakakis
George Basios
Pantelis Trompoukis
George Labos
Ioannis Grammatikakis
Demetrios Kassanos
Author Affiliation
Third Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Athens, Attikon University Hospital, Athens, Greece. trakakis@yahoo.gr
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2010 Jan;26(1):63-71
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Algorithms
Diagnostic Techniques, Endocrine
Genetic Counseling - methods
Genetics, Population - trends
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Steroid 21-Hydroxylase - genetics
Abstract
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to deficiency of the enzyme 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) is distinguished in classical (C-CAH) and non-classical form (NC-CAH), and it is also one of the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorders in humans. The prevalence of C-CAH is between 1:10,000 and 1:15,000 among the live neonates of North America and Europe while the NC-CAH occurs in approximately 0.2% of the general white population. The highest incidence of CAH (1:282 and 1:2141, respectively) has been evaluated in Yupik Eskimos in Alaska and in the populations of the island La Reunion (France), while the lower was detected in New Zealand newborns (0.3%). Nowadays, it has been established that except for the adrenal cortex in CAH cases, the adrenal medulla was also affected. In human 21-OH deficient adrenal gland it has been discovered that not only the chromaffin cells formed extensive neurites, expanding between adrenocortical cells, but also that the adrenal androgens promote outgrowth, whereas glucocorticoids preserve neuroendocrine cells. It seems that normal cortisol secretion by the adrenal cortex is necessary for adrenomedullary organogenesis. The synthesis of 21-OH is controlled by the active CYP21A2 gene located at a distance of 30 kb from a highly homologous pseudogene designated CYP21A1P.
PubMed ID
19499408 View in PubMed
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Are the cause(s) responsible for urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk rooted in families or in individuals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169423
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):971-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2006
Author
Carsten B Pedersen
Preben Bo Mortensen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Register-based Research, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. cbp@ncrr.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):971-8
Date
Jun-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Birth Order
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Rural Population - trends
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Social Environment
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
Many studies have identified urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk. Hypothetical underlying cause(s) may include toxic exposures, diet, infections, and selective migration. The authors investigated whether the underlying cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences were rooted in families or in individuals. Linking data from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, a population-based cohort of 711,897 people aged 15 years or more was established. Overall, 2,720 persons developed schizophrenia during the period 1970-2001. The authors evaluated whether the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect on schizophrenia risk. If the cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences are rooted in individuals only, the nearest older sibling's place of birth should have no independent effect. In this analysis, the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect; among persons who lived in a rural area during their first 15 years of life, the relative risk was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 2.30) if their nearest older sibling had been born in the capital area as compared with a rural area. Some of the cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk are rooted in families, but some might also be rooted in individuals.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):979-8116675534
PubMed ID
16675535 View in PubMed
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Chain of care in chest pain--differences between three hospitals in an urban area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129323
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Jun 20;166(2):440-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2013
Author
A. Ravn-Fischer
T. Karlsson
M. Santos
B. Bergman
P. Johanson
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Jun 20;166(2):440-7
Date
Jun-20-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chest Pain - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Coronary Angiography - trends - utilization
Female
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
To describe differences in treatment and delay times in acute chest pain at the three hospitals in Göteborg, Sweden.
All patients admitted to the three hospitals within Sahlgrenska University (SU) (Sahlgrenska: SU/S, Östra: SU/Ö and Mölndal: SU/M) with acute chest pain during 3 months in 2008 were evaluated for diagnosis, early treatment and outcome.
In all, 2588 visits by 2393 patients were included (visits n=1253 SU/S; n=853 SU/Ö; n=482 SU/M) of which 50%, 63% and 51% were hospitalised (p
PubMed ID
22119114 View in PubMed
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Contribution of drinking patterns to differences in rates of alcohol related problems between three urban populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181507
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
M. Bobak
R. Room
H. Pikhart
R. Kubinova
S. Malyutina
A. Pajak
S. Kurilovitch
R. Topor
Y. Nikitin
M. Marmot
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Health and Society, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. martinb@public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-42
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
To examine, on empirical data, whether drinking patterns, in addition to overall alcohol consumption, contribute to differences in rates of alcohol related problems between populations.
Cross sectional survey.
One Russian, one Polish, and one Czech city.
1118 men and 1125 women randomly selected from population registers.
Problem drinking; negative social consequences of drinking; alcohol consumption and drinking pattern.
Rates of problem drinking and of negative consequences of drinking were much higher in Russian men (35% and 18%, respectively) than in Czechs (19% and 10%) or Poles (14% and 8%). This contrasts with substantially lower mean annual intake of alcohol reported by Russian men (4.6 litres) than by Czech men (8.5 litres), and with low mean drinking frequency in Russia (67 drinking sessions per year, compared with 179 sessions among Czech men). However, Russians consumed the highest dose of alcohol per drinking session (means 71 g in Russians, 46 g in Czechs, and 45 g in Poles), and had the highest prevalence of binge drinking. In women, the levels of alcohol related problems and of drinking were low in all countries. In ecological and individual level analyses, indicators of binge drinking explained a substantial part of differences in rates of problem drinking and negative consequences of drinking between the three countries.
These empirical data confirm high levels of alcohol related problems in Russia despite low volume of drinking. The binge drinking pattern partly explains this paradoxical finding. Overall alcohol consumption does not suffice as an estimate of alcohol related problems at the population level.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14966239 View in PubMed
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Death from liver disease in a cohort of injecting opioid users in a Swedish city in relation to registration for opioid substitution therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290142
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 05; 36(3):424-431
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
Anna Jerkeman
Anders Håkansson
Rebecca Rylance
Philippe Wagner
Marianne Alanko Blomé
Per Björkman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Section for Infectious Diseases, Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 05; 36(3):424-431
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Liver Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Needle-Exchange Programs - trends
Opiate Substitution Treatment - mortality - trends
Opioid-Related Disorders - diagnosis - mortality
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - diagnosis - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Injecting opioid users are at elevated risk of death. Although liver disease (especially hepatitis C) is common, its impact on mortality is low in active injectors. Because opioid substitution therapy (OST) reduces the risk of death from directly drug related causes, we hypothesised that the proportion of liver-related deaths would increase in subjects receiving OST. We investigated liver-related mortality in a cohort of injecting opioid users attending a needle exchange program (NEP) in a Swedish city in relation to OST exposure.
Participants enrolled in the NEP between 1987 and 2011 with available national identity numbers, and registered use of opioids, were included. Linkage based on national identity numbers was performed with national registers for death, emigration and prescription of OST. Participants were categorised as non-OST recipients until the registered date of first OST prescription, and hence as OST recipients. Hazard ratios were calculated by Cox regression for overall and liver-related mortality in relation to OST, with OST as a time-dependent variable.
Among 4494 NEP participants, 1488 opioid users were identified; 711/1488 had been prescribed OST. During a follow-up period of 15?546 person-years 368 deaths occurred. Sixteen deaths were caused by liver disease; 10 of these occurred in OST recipients. The risk of liver-related death was significantly increased in OST receiving participants (hazard ratio 3.08, 95% confidence interval [1.09, 8.68], P?=?0.03).
Liver related mortality among opioid users was significantly elevated in OST recipients, showing the long-term importance of chronic liver disease in this population. [Jerkeman A, Håkansson A, Rylance R, Wagner P, Alanko Blomé M, Björkman P. Death from liver disease in a cohort of injecting opioid users in a Swedish city in relation to registration for opioid substitution therapy. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:424-431].
PubMed ID
27241955 View in PubMed
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Epidemiological, social and psychiatric aspects in self-poisoned patients. A prospective comparative study from Trondheim, Norway between 1978 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12051
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Mar;26(2):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
T. Rygnestad
L. Hauge
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Mar;26(2):53-62
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Overdose - mortality
Poisoning - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population - trends
Suicide - trends
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
A prospective study of an unselected group of patients admitted in a Medical Department in 1978 (n = 257) and 1987 (n = 361) after deliberate self-poisoning is presented. The rate increased significantly over the period of the study (P less than 0.05). Family problems, unemployment, poor social conditions and alcohol and drug abuse had increased. The main psychiatric diagnosis was neurosis. From 1978 to 1987 "abuse" had increased substantially. The 10-year mortality rate was 4.5 and 4.1 times the expected value for female and male patients, respectively. We conclude that social and psychiatric problems are increasing and that the treatment of these patients today is far from satisfactory.
PubMed ID
2047904 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic characteristics and time trend in the prevalence of anotia and microtia in China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277810
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2016 Feb;106(2):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kui Deng
Li Dai
Ling Yi
Changfei Deng
Xiaohong Li
Jun Zhu
Source
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2016 Feb;106(2):88-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
China - epidemiology
Congenital Microtia - epidemiology
Ear - abnormalities
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Urban Population - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have shown an inconsistent time trend on the prevalence of anotia and microtia. Little has been reported on the epidemiologic characteristics of anotia and microtia in the Chinese population.
Data from 1996-2007 were obtained from the Chinese Birth Defects Monitoring Network in China. Birth prevalence of anotia and microtia were assessed according to demographic characteristics and annual time trend. Poisson regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for selected demographic characteristics and subgroups of anotia and microtia.
A total of 1933 cases with anotia/microtia were identified among 6,308,594 live births, stillbirths, and terminations of pregnancy, yielding a rate of 3.06 per 10,000 births. Isolated anotia/microtia had a prevalence of 2.25 per 10,000 births, whereas among nonisolated cases, the prevalence was 0.81 per 10,000 births. The prevalence rates of anotia/microtia increased significantly during 1996-2007 (p?
PubMed ID
26681129 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.